Corpse Reviver No.2 – Make The Original 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book Recipe

Corpse Reviver No.2 Cocktail
Corpse Reviver No.2 Cocktail

Kina Lillet Substitute: Should You Use Lillet Blanc Or Cocchi Americano?

Unfortunately, the original ingredient Kina Lillet was discontinued by the Lillet company in 1986. What replaced it is Lillet Blanc, but Lillet Blanc is a different wine from what Kina Lillet was. I will clearly say I have personally never tasted the now defunct Kina Lillet. But from other sources and individuals familiar with its taste, most say Cocchi Americano is closer to what Kina Lillet used to taste like than Lillet Blanc. So even though it shares the Lillet name, you may want to substitute Cocchi Americano for the Kina Lillet. For any pre-1980s cocktail that calls for Kina Lillet, use Cocchi Americano.

What Does The Corpse Reviver No.2 Taste Like?

So the corpse reviver no.2 will taste different depending on if you use Lillet Blanc or Cocchi Americano. Again the two aperitifs taste similar, but the corpse reviver no.2 made with Cocchi will have a very slight woody sweet bitterness. The one made with Lillet will not. That woody, sweet bitterness reminds me of tamarind. The corpse reviver no.2 is a beautiful balance of sweet and sour citrus, herbal, and fruit flavors. The Lillet version will be a bit less sweet than the one made with Cocchi, but the Cocchi one has a nice woody-ness the one made with Lillet lacks.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1930, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Corpse Reviver No.2

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

132

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Corpse Reviver No.2.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Absinthe

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Cocchi Americano

  • 2/3 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Dream Cocktail – Make This Fantastic 1934 Savoy Cocktail Recipe

Dream Cocktail
Dream Cocktail

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition ended, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Use A Nice Brandy For This Cocktail.

This isn’t often the case, but a top-shelf base spirit will improve this cocktail. Spirits that are good for sipping are not suitable for mixing. You add so many other intense flavors when mixing a drink, like liqueurs, juice, sweeteners, bitters, etc. A subtle and refined spirit gets overpowered and lost. Don’t get me wrong, you don’t want to use crap spirit, but a less mellow and subtle spirit that does not lend itself to being an easy sipper will make for a better, more balanced cocktail, except in the case of cocktails like this one.

Since this cocktail is almost all brandy with just a few dashes of absinthe and orange liqueur, the better the Brandy, the better the cocktail; this cocktail is like sipping straight brandy, so treat it that way. Treat this and pick a brandy for this cocktail the same way you would whiskey for an old-fashioned and not a rum for a rum and coke.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Dream Cocktail

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

4

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

40%

Total time

0

minutes

Learn how to make the Dream cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Absinthe
  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 2 oz

  • Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Sidecar – Make This Amazing Early 1900s French Cocktail

Sidecar
Sidecar

This is the fancy French version of the Whiskey Sour. It is fancier because it replaces simple syrup with orange liqueur and uses brandy instead of whiskey. It was invented during WWI and most likely came about by American soldiers wanting drinks that resembled Whiskey Sours while in France and the bartenders mixing drinks with their local liquor stock.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Sidecar

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Sidecar.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Bombay No.2 Cocktail – Make The Classic 1930 Savoy Recipe

Bombay No.2 Cocktail
Bombay No.2 Cocktail

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

What Does The Bombay No.2 Taste like

The Bombay No.2 is very herbal forward with an oddly orange taste. There is an orange liqueur, but the orange herbal flavor comes from the sweet and dry vermouth. It’s an excellent cocktail with a beautiful fruity herbal taste that is difficult to describe. So why not just make one and try it yourself.

The Most Important Ingredient

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is absolutely the vermouths. It will still be good with cheaper vermouths, but nicer dry and sweet vermouths will take it to another level. The primary flavors in the Bombay No.2 come from those two ingredients, so make them good and add the best flavors you can.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Bombay #2

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

206

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Bombay No.2 cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash

  • Absinthe
  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Between The Sheets – Make The Classic 1930 Harry Craddock Recipe

Between The Sheets
Between The Sheets

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

What Does The Between The Sheets Taste Like?

This is hard to describe, but The Between the Sheets tastes like a boozier, sweeter, almost all alcohol version of a sidecar. The rum, brandy, and orange liqueur balance out well for a sweet while still potent cocktail, and the small amount of lemon juice provides citrus flavor without the acidity. If you like the taste of the sidecar and enjoy drinking Manhattans or an old fashioned, you should give this one a try too.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Between the Sheets

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

220

kcal
ABV

37%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing between the sheets cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp

  • Lemon Juice
  • 1 oz

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Gold Rum
  • 1 oz

  • Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Whiskey Crusta – Make The Original 1860s Jerry Thomas Recipe

Whiskey Crusta Cocktail
Whiskey Crusta Cocktail

The History Of the Crusta Style Cocktail.

First printed in the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas, the Brandy Crusta is old as it is delicious. The Crusta is considered one of the oldest fancy sours and is named for its decorative sugar-crusted rim. It was invented in the 1850s by Joseph Santini in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, and was made to try and improve the taste of the standard sour cocktail. You can spot a crusta by its oversized decorative lemon peel that imparts that this is a special elevated sour cocktail.

How Do Crustas Taste Like?

These fantastic cocktails taste light and delicate while not being overly sour or overly sweet. While the standard sour is more flavorful and benefits from sharper, more intense spirits, this one is different. In my experience, a top-shelf spirit works better. This is because you are not overwhelming the base spirit with a whole ounce of sweetener and citrus, and the more subtle finer qualities of a better base spirit can still come through. Make this with the perspective that you are not making a solid, flavorful cocktail but adding subtle flavor and complexity to an already delicious spirit.

Balancing This Delicious and Subtle Cocktail.

There isn’t any single essential ingredient in this cocktail; instead, all the elements come together in the proper balance. But if I tried to narrow it down, I would say the brandy, orange liqueur, and gum syrup are the most essential parts of this cocktail. You want to use a good base spirit for this cocktail as none of the other ingredients are made to mask the flavor of a lower-quality spirit. So whatever the quality of the base spirit will make a meaningful difference in the final product. The orange liqueur matters, too, because cheap orange liqueurs are typically not very good. I love buying on value, but I’ve never found a cheaper orange liqueur that also tasted good, and with how this drink is structured, you will notice a cheap orange liqueur—lastly, the gum syrup. You can use a standard simple syrup if you prefer and what that will change is the cocktail’s texture. Gum Syrup has gum arabic and gives the cocktail a velvety consistency similar to what egg whites provide. A smooth, meringue-y, velvet, dessert-like texture. Standard simple syrup will not add this texture and make for a thinner liquid texture cocktail, but you may prefer that. If you like your sours without egg whites, then opt for using standard simple syrup but if you like sours with egg whites, buy a bottle of gum syrup and give it a go.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Whiskey Crusta

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

211

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Whiskey Crusta Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Gum Syrup

  • 1 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 dases Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Moisten a cocktail glass rim with a cut lemon slice and rub the end in granulated sugar to create a sugar crust.
  • Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir for about 10 seconds to dilute and combine the ingredients.
  • Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a whole lemon peel that circles the glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Avenue Cocktail – Delicious Classic 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail

Avenue Cocktail
Avenue Cocktail

The History Of The Avenue Cocktail.

The Avenue Cocktail was first written in London’s 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. The Author, William Tarling, is credited for creating this fantastic cocktail and many other more famous ones. The first written recipe for the margarita is from the Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. Whether he is the actual creator of the margarita is up for debate, but he is recognized as the creator of the Avenue cocktail.

What Does The Avenue Taste Like?

The Avenue is a beautiful cocktail that is both strong and balanced. The gentler mix of brandy and scotch blends well with the Passion fruit, pomegranate, and orange flavors and creates an almost European tropical cocktail. William Tarling used lesser-known and exotic ingredients, and the Avenue Cocktail displays that. At 60 mLs of the European spirit and 40 mLs of exotic tropical flavors, the Avenue has one foot in Europe and one foot in the exotic. Unfortunately, this isn’t something you can order at any bar. Most bars, even high-end ones, have probably never made this before, and passion fruit juice is not a commonly held ingredient. If you want to order this out, you will first need to ask if the bar has passion fruit juice, and if they do,eed to you will also n give them the recipe. This will most likely be one you make for yourself and friends at home.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

Balancing The Flavors Of This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in the Avenue is both brandy and scotch. This is a very mellow drink, and a smoother brandy and scotch balance the drink well. The passion fruit, grenadine, and orange liqueur are not overly assertive in this cocktail, and if you use a powerful flavored spirit for the brandy or scotch, it tips the scale too much. Though this isn’t a make or break for the drink, use it if there is brandy or scotch you like. That being said, a smoky scotch will ruin this drink. Smoke, tobacco, or peat moss flavors will not mix with the other flavors.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Avenue Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

190

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Avenue cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Passion Fruit Juice
  • 1 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 1 tsp

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Scotch
  • 1 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Honeymoon – Make This Beautiful 1917 Hugo Ensslin’s Beautiful Recipe

Honeymoon Cocktail
Honeymoon Cocktail

Invented by Hugo Ensslin and first written in his 1916 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks, this is a beautiful little drink. With a name like a honeymoon, you would think it would have honey in it, but it doesn’t. Not much to say about it other than it’s a pre-prohibition cocktail that uses apple brandy and benedictine together in a lovely way.

The Hotel Wallick History

Built in the 1880s as the “Hotel Cadillac” it was eventually sold to the Wallick brothers in 1905. Located on 43rd and Broadway (Times Square), the Hotel Cadillac branded itself as an exciting place for food, drinks, and entertainment. In 1913 the Wallick Brothers changed the name to “Hotel Wallick”, and relaunched the hotel where It became famous for its burlesque and cabaret shows. Unlike other New York hotels with famous bartenders that tended to appeal to older wealthy guest, the Hotel Wallick was a young businessman’s party hotel. It was during this period that many of Hugo’s famous cocktails such as the aviation, honeymoon, and paradise cocktail were invented. In 1919 (beginnings of prohibition) the hotel sold knowing its drunken party business was over and was renamed “The Cadillac” by its new owners. In 1933 prohibition was repealed but the country was already dealing with the Great Depression. While the hotel had managed to survive prohibition it was unable to weather the depression and closed its doors in 1939. The building was demolished in 1940.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Honeymoon

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

34%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Honeymoon Cocktail from Hugo Ensslin 1917 cocktail boob Recipes for Mixed Drinks.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Apple Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Ampersand – Make This Amazing Classic Waldorf Astoria Recipe

Ampersand Cocktail
Ampersand Cocktail

The Ampersand was invented sometime in the early 1930s. The oldest known printed reference to it is the 1935 Waldorf-Astoria bar book. This drink is pretty awesome, but unfortunately, it didn’t last long as Old Tom Gin stopped being produced 15 years later. Old Tom gin wasn’t made again until 2007.

The History Of The Original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

The original Waldorf Hotel was opened in 1893 by William Waldorf Astor of New York. Named after the town of Waldorf, Germany, the Astor Families’ ancestral home, the Waldorf was the apex of luxury New York hotels at its opening. A few years later, in 1897, as a bit of humorous rivalry, William’s cousin, John Jacob Astor IV, would open the Astoria Hotel right across the street. John built the Astoria in the same renaissance revival style and even commissioned the same architect, but made sure to make his hotel a little bit bigger than William’s Waldorf Hotel. Named after the town of Astoria, Oregon, The city founded by John Jacob Astor senior in 1811, the Astoria Hotel was an even more beautiful version of the Waldorf. Fun facts: Astoria, Oregon, is the oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains and the location of the film Kindergartner Cop, starring the great Arnold Schwarzenegger. Also, John Jacob Astor IV helped develop early versions of the turbine engine, wrote sci-fi books, and was one of the most famous Americans to perish with the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

The rivalry was short-lived, though, and the two hotels joined together almost immediately, forming the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1897. Opened on the Waldorf side of the hotel, the Waldorf-Astoria bar was one of the top bars in New York, serving wealthy socialites. From 1897 to 1919, the Waldorf-Astoria bar stood as a testament to the pre-prohibition elite bar scene and helped solidify many of the American classics we know today. With the closing of the bar in 1919 and many of the New York elites moving further north, the hotel’s image became dated, and its current structure and location needed to change too. In 1929 the company sold its hotel on 5th and 34th to Empire State Inc. and began constructing the more modern Waldorf-Astoria on Park Avenue. The original hotel was demolished and replaced by the Empire State Building. Hoping to preserve the legacy of the original hotel’s bar, the company’s publicist, Albert Crockett, managed to collect and publish most of the bar’s classic cocktail recipes in part IV section A of “The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.” He added popular present-day (1934) cocktails in Section B but maintained that section A of the book had all the original recipes from the hotel’s old days.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Ampersand

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

233

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Classic Waldorf Astoria Amersand Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Old Tom Gin

  • 1 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass and garnish with an orange peel.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Adios Motherfucker – Make The Best AMF You Will Ever Have

Adios Motherfucker Cocktail
Adios Motherfucker Cocktail

Is The AMF a Trashy Drink?

I know the name of this is Vintage American Cocktails and that this is not a vintage cocktail, but who cares. The truth is it’s a pretty good cocktail, and contrary to popular belief, it’s not that boozy. Or, if made correctly, it shouldn’t be. This cocktail has a reputation, similar to the Cosmopolitan, for being a trashy club drink young people like to order so they can say they got an Adios Motherfucker. Unfortunately, because of this connection, it’s suffered the same fate as the Cosmopolitan; A good cocktail that ordinary people are afraid to order to avoid looking trashy. Granted, its name is Adios MotherFucker, so it was destined to end up with that image. Another name is the AMF, but saying Motherfucker is a lot more fun.

The most recipe calls for sweet and sour, but the sweet and sour mix is a poor imitation of orange liqueur, sugar, and lemon juice. This version of the Adios has all the same per proportions as a more standard recipe, but by replacing the sweet and sour mix and sprite with better ingredients, you get something much better. This is an excellent version of the adios.

Adios MotherFucker Vs Long Island Ice Tea.

It’s similar to the Long Island Ice Tea in that it has almost every different kind of spirit in it. Unlike the long island, they are in small quantities, and if you’re going by ABV and structure, it’s actually more similar to a John Collins than the Long Island Ice Tea.

What is the Difference Between Cointreau, Orange Liqueur, and Blue Curacao?

Cointreau and Curacao or blue curaçao are all the same liqueur. The only difference is that Cointreau is a brand name, and Blue curaçao is a general term for an orange liqueur with added blue food dye. They are all orange liqueurs and the difference between them and other orange liqueurs like triple sec all comes down to brand names and marketing gimmicks. Bols was the first to manufacture orange liqueur using the bitter oranges from the island of Curacao, owned in the Caribbean. As orange liqueur grew in popularity in Europe, other manufacturers entered the scene. Cointreau marketed theirs as being made from a triple distilled dry beet sugar spirit base, providing a more bright, clean, orange taste. They called it Cointreau triple sec. They owned the name Cointreau but not triple sec, and soon many cheap orange liqueurs flooded the market as “triple sec” liqueurs. Some branded themselves as a “Curacao” liqueur, and others began adding bright-colored food dyes to make them stand out from the others. Cointreau eventually dropped the headline triple sec from its marketing since the term was now associated with cheaper products, but the term endures. That is a brief history of how the market became flooded with triple secs, curacaos, colored curacaos, Cointreaus, etc., that are ultimately the same ingredient but cause so much confusion for so many people. For a more in-depth history of Orange liqueur, please download my app and navigate to the orange liqueur ingredient description. links at the bottom of this page

What Does The AMF Taste Like?

The Adios Motherfucker is a great cocktail. Its taste is similar to a Collins-style cocktail, and the bright blue color is fun. Even though it has the same spirits as the Long Island Ice Tea, it tastes nothing like a Long Island. The Adios has almost a boozy sparkling lemonade taste. The sweetness and soda water helps cut the drink to a more manageable alcohol level and make it (I think) a refreshing cocktail that will still give you a slight buzz.

The Most Important ingredient.

There is no ingredient in the Adios that affects the flavor in any meaningful way. There are so many different ingredients in such small amounts that they all get lost. The only advice I have for this cocktail is not to buy Blue orange liqueur but use one drop of blue food dye instead. Unless you plan to make tons of these quickly, your best bet is to buy a normal clear orange liqueur like Cointreau and add blue dye. Because if you buy blue orange liqueur, you will be trapped into only being able to use it for this and maybe a couple of other cocktails. I have a bottle of blue curacao that I bought maybe 4 or 5 years ago, and it’s still half full.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Adios Motherfucker

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

311

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

The best Adios Motherfucker that actually taste great.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz  Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • If you do not have blue orange liqueur then add 1 drop of blue food dye
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass and gently add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.