Singapore Sling – Original Recipe & History

Singapore Sling

Singapore Sling

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Singapore
Servings

1

servings
Calories

259

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Singapore Sling.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Kirschwasser

  • 1 oz Benedictine

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into a glass with ice.
  • Top off with soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Singapore Sling.

The Singapore sling was invented in 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon while working at the Long Bar in the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. The Singapore Sling was listed as a simple gin sling on the cocktail menu, but its uniqueness garnered it the nickname of the Singapore Sling. Like Henry Ramos thought of his famous cocktail as standard gin fizz, the rest of the world saw it as a Ramos gin fizz.

Early cocktail history from Singapore is almost non-existent. The earliest documentation of the Singapore Sling comes from the 1939 “The Gentleman’s Companion, An Exotic Drinking Book,” where author Charles Baker jr. recounts his wild drinking adventures in 1920s Southeast Asia. The book’s structure is terrible and reads more like a man stroking his ego than a cocktail book, but It’s incredible a book like this exists. There are some fantastic and unique drinks in it I would like to incorporate when I have the time. In the book, Charles Baker jr. tells a story about him and a friend drinking Singapore Slings at the Hotel Raffles in 1926. The recipe he provides is substantially different from what you will find today. Different from the ones sold at the Ruffles Hotel today. The recipe he gives is more like a traditional sling, whereas most modern recipes are tiki-like. Not quite a traditional sling, but close enough. In the 1800s, Slings were another name for a toddy, and most 19th and early 20th-century cocktail books grouped the two. If you would like a detailed account of sling and toddy history, check out the “The History of Sling Cocktails” section below.

According to Charles Baker, Ngiam Tong Boon’s original recipe was equal parts dry gin, cherry brandy, and benedictine, shaken together and poured into a highball glass with ice. The drink was then topped off with soda water (that’s the weird part. A traditional sling uses standard water) and garnished with a lime peel.

Interestingly, this recipe appears in the 1948 edition of Trader Vic’s Bartenders Guide but is named the Raffles Hotel Sling. The Singapore sling recipe listed in that book looks like the juice and syrup kind we are typically used to seeing today.

What Does The Singapore Sling Taste Like?

The Singapore sling is herbal, boozy, lightly sweet, and refreshing. It’s more similar to a Japanese highball than a sweet tiki cocktail. It’s delicious and something I can easily drink 2 or 3 of. The primary flavor in this is the Benedictine, while the other two spirits add backbone and fortification to the Singapore Sling. I vastly prefer this original Singapore Sling to the contemporary versions of it.

Is The Singapore Sling Tiki?

The original Singapore sling is not a tiki cocktail, but the modern recipes are tiki-like. The original Singapore Sling is mostly sling-like (technically, it should be classified as a highball), and over time it evolved into the juice and syrup-filled cocktail it is today. I have a feeling the Singapore Sling recipes filled with pineapple juice, grenadine, and such that we are used to today were invented in the tiki world.

The History Of Sling Cocktails.

Slings are a very old style of cocktail. Even in Harry Johnson’s 1888 edition of The Bartenders Manual, he comments under the cold whiskey sling that “This is an old-fashioned drink generally called for by old gentlemen.” The oldest cocktail book I could find to have a sling recipe is the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas. He has three recipes for both hot and cold slings. Interestingly enough, he groups both slings with toddies. The only difference is slings have nutmeg grated on top, and toddies do not. Often most early cocktails started as medicinal drinks, and the brandy and gin sling appear in a few medical journals from the 1830s.

In the August 1832 Boston medical and surgical journal, on page 15, the author notes giving a patient 1 to 5 grains of opium with a hot brandy sling to treat spotted fever and malignant cholera. Further linking its history to toddies, I found a September 1845 court case of the Massachusetts Commonwealth vs. Chester R. White. He sold a toddy/sling to a Mr. Edwin T. Rogers without a spirituous liquor license. Mr. White argued that it contained an ingredient that was a spirit, but the mixed drink itself was not a spirit. Mr. White did not win the case, but the court documents’ wording of the drink is essential.

“It was sold in the form of gin and brandy, mixed with sugar and water so as to make what is called a toddy or sling.”

The court documents recognize toddies and slings as analogous to each other. In a case about the exact definition of a spirituous beverage, the court referred to the same drink as being called both a toddy or sling. Seventeen years later, Jerry Thomas would see toddies and slings as the same thing, and so did this court. This makes sense too. If you check out my Hot Toddy article, I describe how in the 18-century, toddies were used to administer medicines. Sling appears to be a later way of describing a toddy as a drink one throws back. I assume that this is perhaps due to how people often quickly drink medicine to avoid undesirable flavors. Etymologically the word sling entered English from the old Norse word “Slyngva,” which means to throw or knockdown, and this is the more common usage, but about the drink, the word sling comes from the German word “Schlingen,” which means to swallow. Webster’s American dictionary dates this usage of the word to have entered the American dialect around 1807.

The more popular Singapore Sling and Straits Sling bear no resemblance to the traditional sling. It seems they were referring to them as slings to be more for fun alliteration than to refer to how the drink should be consumed.

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Holland Cocktail – Original Recipe & History

Holland Cocktail

Holland Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Holland Cocktail from the mid 1800s

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Genever

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

One of the old classics from Jerry Thomas, the Holland Cocktail is one of the few gin cocktails made with Genever before Old Tom Gin, and London Dry became popular. Dating back to the 1800s, this cocktail was first published in Jerry Thomas’s first edition of the Bartender’s Guide in 1862. A modified or improved version of this would be printed two years after Jerry Thomas’s death in the 1887 edition.

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East India Cocktail – Classic Recipe & History

East India Cocktail

East India Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

232

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1882 East India Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

This is cocktail #175 in Harry Johnson’s 1882 print of the Bartenders Manual. Harry Johnson was a German-born (Specifically Prussian-born, A unified Germany didn’t exist yet) bartender and peered at Jerry Thomas. Jerry Thomas does steal a lot of Harry Johnson’s thunder since he was the first one to be published, but both created amazing recipes. Since Harry Johnson was german-born, his books are written in English and German.

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Corpse Reviver No.2 – Original Recipe & History

Corpse Reviver No.2

Corpse Reviver No.2

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

132

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Corpse Reviver No.2.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Absinthe

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Cocchi Americano

  • 2/3 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes

What Does The Corpse Reviver No.2 Taste Like?

So the corpse reviver no.2 will taste different depending on if you use Lillet Blanc or Cocchi Americano. Again the two aperitifs taste similar, but the corpse reviver no.2 made with Cocchi will have a very slight woody sweet bitterness. The one made with Lillet will not. That woody, sweet bitterness reminds me of tamarind. The corpse reviver no.2 is a beautiful balance of sweet and sour citrus, herbal, and fruit flavors. The Lillet version will be a bit less sweet than the one made with Cocchi, but the Cocchi one has a nice woody-ness the one made with Lillet lacks.

Kina Lillet Substitute: Should You Use Lillet Blanc Or Cocchi Americano?

Unfortunately, the original ingredient Kina Lillet was discontinued by the Lillet company in 1986. What replaced it is Lillet Blanc, but Lillet Blanc is a different wine from what Kina Lillet was. I will clearly say I have personally never tasted the now defunct Kina Lillet. But from other sources and individuals familiar with its taste, most say Cocchi Americano is closer to what Kina Lillet used to taste like than Lillet Blanc. So even though it shares the Lillet name, you may want to substitute Cocchi Americano for the Kina Lillet. For any pre-1980s cocktail that calls for Kina Lillet, use Cocchi Americano.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1930, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Dream – Classic Recipe

Dream Cocktail

Dream Cocktail

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

4

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

40%

Total time

0

minutes

Learn how to make the Dream cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Absinthe
  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 2 oz

  • Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

Use A Nice Brandy For This Cocktail.

The Dream Cocktail is a fantastic drink. When making this cocktail recipe it’s important to use a nice Brandy. This isn’t often the case, but a top-shelf base spirit will improve this cocktail. Spirits that are good for sipping are not suitable for mixing. You add so many other intense flavors when mixing a drink, like liqueurs, juice, sweeteners, bitters, etc. A subtle and refined spirit gets overpowered and lost. Don’t get me wrong, you don’t want to use crap spirit, but a less mellow and subtle spirit that does not lend itself to being an easy sipper will make for a better, more balanced cocktail, except in the case of cocktails like this one.

Since this cocktail is almost all brandy with just a few dashes of absinthe and orange liqueur, the better the Brandy, the better the cocktail; this cocktail is like sipping straight brandy, so treat it that way. Treat this and pick a brandy for this cocktail the same way you would whiskey for an old-fashioned and not a rum for a rum and coke.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition ended, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Side Car – Original Recipe & History

Sidecar

Side Car

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Side Car.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Side Car

The Side Car is often considered a French cocktail, which I believed too for many years, but it is British. Barman Pat MacGarry invented the Side-Car at Buck’s Club sometime between 1919 and 1923. We know this because the earliest printed recipe for the Side Car comes from the 1923 book “Harry of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails” by Harry McElhone. McElhone credits Pat MacGarry for inventing the Side Car while at Buck’s Club. In the 1925 Frech cocktail book “L’Art du Shaker” by Dominique Migliorero. Migliorero also credits the creation of the Side Car to MacGarry of London. Buck’s Club opened in 1919. Therefore Pat MacGarry had to have invented it between 1919 and 1923.

The History Of Buck’s Club London

The Buck Club was founded in 1919 by Herbert Buckmaster of the Royal Horse Guard. Herbert Buckmaster intended Buck’s Club to be an upper-class club with less of the stuffiness of other elite London clubs. One of Buckmaster’s requirements for the club was it should have an American-style bar. Not uncommon in hotels that served guests from overseas, but the idea of an American Bar in a prestigious invite-only boys club was unheard of. Buckmaster hired Pat MacGarry to head his American Bar. MacGarry never published his own cocktail book, but he is credited with having invented the Buck’s Fizz and the side-car. To this day, Buck’s Club is still an all-boys, invitation-only club.

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Hemingway Daiquiri – Classic Recipe & History

Hemingway Daiquiri

Hemingway Daiquiri

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Hemingway Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

History Of The Hemingway Daiquiri

The Hemingway Daiquiri is not the Papa Doble. The two are often considered the same, and the Hemingway daiquiri is also called a Papa Doble. The Papa Doble was a very different cocktail that most people would not like. The Hemingway Daiquiri as we know it today started to appear around the 1960s. One of its earliest references is from the publication ” Cuba, Paloma de Vuelo Popular” by Nestor Teran. Teran refers to the cocktail as the Hemingway Special at Bar Floridita. If Hemingway had this cocktail, it was probably much later in his life (he passed in 1961), and residents knew this was not the Papa Doble but a different cocktail entirely. The 1972 Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide calls this drink the Floridita Special. Victor Bergeron’s cocktail information is often very much on point. He didn’t just know tiki but traditional cocktails and Caribbean cocktails too. As a bartender from the 1930s to 1970s, his knowledge of cocktails is trustworthy. The earliest Hemingway Daiquiri recipes are shaken with crushed ice and dirty poured into a glass like the Papa Doble, but the Trader Vic recipe is blended into a slushy cocktail. Thus taking on its current form.

By the 1990s, every publication I found simultaneously calls the Papa Doble the Hemingway Daiquiri. The list is too numerous to cite, so the example I will mention is the 1998 book “The Hemingway Cookbook” by Craig Boreth. Boreth implies that the Hemingway Daiquiri is also called the Papa Doble, Wild Daiquiri, and Daiquiri Special. A lot of names for one drink.

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Papa Doble References

Hemingway Daiquiri References

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Bombay No.2 – Original Recipe

Bombay No.2 Cocktail

Bombay #2

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

206

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Bombay No.2 cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash

  • Absinthe
  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Bombay No.2 Taste like

The Bombay No.2 is very herbal forward with an oddly orange taste. There is an orange liqueur, but the orange herbal flavor comes from the sweet and dry vermouth. It’s an excellent cocktail with a beautiful fruity herbal taste that is difficult to describe. So why not just make one and try it yourself.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is absolutely the vermouths. It will still be good with cheaper vermouths, but nicer dry and sweet vermouths will take it to another level. The primary flavors in the Bombay No.2 come from those two ingredients, so make them good and add the best flavors you can.

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Between The Sheets – Original Recipe

Between The Sheets

Between the Sheets

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

220

kcal
ABV

37%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing between the sheets cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp

  • Lemon Juice
  • 1 oz

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Gold Rum
  • 1 oz

  • Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Between The Sheets Taste Like?

This is hard to describe, but The Between the Sheets tastes like a boozier, sweeter, almost all alcohol version of a sidecar. The rum, brandy, and orange liqueur balance out well for a sweet while still potent cocktail, and the small amount of lemon juice provides citrus flavor without the acidity. If you like the taste of the sidecar and enjoy drinking Manhattans or an old fashioned, you should give this one a try too.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Whiskey Crusta – Original Recipe & History

Whiskey Crusta Cocktail

Whiskey Crusta

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

211

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Whiskey Crusta Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Gum Syrup

  • 1 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 dases Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Moisten a cocktail glass rim with a cut lemon slice and rub the end in granulated sugar to create a sugar crust.
  • Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir for about 10 seconds to dilute and combine the ingredients.
  • Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a whole lemon peel that circles the glass.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of the Crusta Style Cocktail.

First printed in the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas, the Brandy Crusta is old as it is delicious. The Crusta is considered one of the oldest fancy sours and is named for its decorative sugar-crusted rim. It was invented in the 1850s by Joseph Santini in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, and was made to try and improve the taste of the standard sour cocktail. You can spot a crusta by its oversized decorative lemon peel that imparts that this is a special elevated sour cocktail.

How Do Crustas Taste Like?

These fantastic cocktails taste light and delicate while not being overly sour or overly sweet. While the standard sour is more flavorful and benefits from sharper, more intense spirits, this one is different. In my experience, a top-shelf spirit works better. This is because you are not overwhelming the base spirit with a whole ounce of sweetener and citrus, and the more subtle finer qualities of a better base spirit can still come through. Make this with the perspective that you are not making a solid, flavorful cocktail but adding subtle flavor and complexity to an already delicious spirit.

Balancing This Delicious and Subtle Cocktail.

There isn’t any single essential ingredient in this cocktail; instead, all the elements come together in the proper balance. But if I tried to narrow it down, I would say the brandy, orange liqueur, and gum syrup are the most essential parts of this cocktail. You want to use a good base spirit for this cocktail as none of the other ingredients are made to mask the flavor of a lower-quality spirit. So whatever the quality of the base spirit will make a meaningful difference in the final product. The orange liqueur matters, too, because cheap orange liqueurs are typically not very good. I love buying on value, but I’ve never found a cheaper orange liqueur that also tasted good, and with how this drink is structured, you will notice a cheap orange liqueur—lastly, the gum syrup. You can use a standard simple syrup if you prefer and what that will change is the cocktail’s texture. Gum Syrup has gum arabic and gives the cocktail a velvety consistency similar to what egg whites provide. A smooth, meringue-y, velvet, dessert-like texture. Standard simple syrup will not add this texture and make for a thinner liquid texture cocktail, but you may prefer that. If you like your sours without egg whites, then opt for using standard simple syrup but if you like sours with egg whites, buy a bottle of gum syrup and give it a go.

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