Lemon Drop Martini – Make The Amazing Classic 1970s Recipe

Lemon Drop Cocktail
Lemon Drop Cocktail

Invented in the 1970s in San Francisco by Norman Jay Hobday, this drink is essentially a fancy Vodka Sour. It replaces the simple syrup with orange liqueur and has a fun, catchy name. I intentionally leave the word martini off because there is nothing martini about this. This is a sour through and through and has more familiarity with the Sidecar than a Dry Martini. Bars like putting this drink in a Martini glass for some reason, thus the confusion.

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Lemon Drop Martini

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

235

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Lemon Drop Martini.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Vodka

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


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Oyster Bay – Make This Classic Pre-Prohibition Cocktail

Oyster Bay
Oyster Bay

This drink is most likely named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, whose home is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During the earlier days of mixing, there was a trend on the east coast to name drinks after regions of New York. If the oyster was a crayon color, one could also say it had an oyster color. Don’t be put off by the strange color of this drink because it’s pretty good.

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Oyster Bay

2 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

194

kcal
ABV

35%

Total time

3

minutes

While not the prettiest cocktail its actually pretty good.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 2 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 tsp Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


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Brandy Daisy – Make The Original 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Brandy Daisy Cocktail
Brandy Daisy Cocktail

The History Of The Daisy Style Cocktail.

The daisy was another early cocktail style emerging around the same time as the crusta and many other early standard sour cocktails. The Daisy is essentially a crusta with an ounce of soda water to cut the intensity and make the cocktail more refreshing. First appearing in the 1862 edition of the bartender’s guide by Jerry Thomas, The daisy is a beautiful cocktail if you find the standard sour is a bit too strong.

What Does The Brandy Daisy Taste Like?

The Brandy Daisy is a beautiful little cocktail that adds a bit of refreshing soda water to a delicious sour cocktail. The small amount of Orange Liqueur adds a pleasant orange flavor on top of the citrus. The primary flavor is still brandy, and the subtle flavors of the brandy shine through in this cocktail.

A Nice Brandy Taste Better In This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is the brandy you use. I don’t often use fine sipping spirits for cocktails. Still, the proportion of the other ingredients is so small that a nicer, more mellow brandy makes for a better-balanced drink where you can still appreciate the subtleties of a nicer brandy. The brandy daisy is a beautiful drink, but it’s not for everyone. If you love brandy and find the sidecar cocktail too sweet, this is the cocktail for you.

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Brandy Daisy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Brandy Daisy.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 3 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 tsp Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Brandy Daisy

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and add the soda water.

Notes


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Old Tom Cocktail – Make This Amazing Classic 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Old Tom Cocktail
Old Tom Cocktail

The Old Tom Cocktail is another classic 1800s cocktail from Jerry Thomas’s 1862 bartending guide. Whether it’s the Old Tom Cocktail, Whiskey Cocktail, Brandy Cocktail, Gin Cocktail, etc., they all are the same except for a different base spirit. If you’re a fan of the Old Fashion but curious to vary it up a little with a different spirit, give it a try.

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Old Tom Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

267

kcal
ABV

37%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Old Tom cocktail from the 1862 edition of the bartenders guide by Jerry Thomas. 

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 2 oz Old Tom Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Long Beach Ice Tea – Make This Refreshing Twist On A Long Island Ice Tea

Long Beach Ice Tea Cocktail
Long Beach Ice Tea Cocktail

Long Beach, CA, is the hometown of the great Snoop Dogg and this refreshing variation of the Long Island Ice Tea. Just like the original Long Island Ice Tea, this cocktail is a one-and-done drink, which is powerful. The Long Beach Ice Tea is precisely the same as the long island but replaces the coke with cranberry juice and turns it into a fruity and slightly tart cocktail. So it will still floor you, but you will be refreshed as you get smashed. As far as where and who created this cocktail, I don’t have the slightest idea. Long Beach, California, maybe…

Bob Butt created the original Long Island Ice Tea in 1972; this drink was an entry into an orange liqueur mixing contest, even though there is hardly any orange liqueur in that cocktail. I hope you enjoy this fantastic west coast variation of the Long Island.

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Long Beach Ice Tea

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

545

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Long Beach Ice Tea.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz Vodka

  • 1.5 oz White Rum

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

  • 1.5 oz Reposado Tequila

  • 1.5 oz Cranberry Juice

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Leatherneck Cocktail – Make The Amazing 1950s Original Recipe

Leatherneck
Leatherneck

The Leatherneck Cocktail History

First Published in Ted Saucier’s 1951 book “Bottoms Up”, the author credits the Leatherneck creation to Frank Farrell. Frank was a former WWII Marine and a columnist for the New York World Telegram and Sun and McNaught Syndicate when he came up with the Leatherneck. Above the cocktail, it reads:

“Shake violently on the rocks and serve in cocktail glass… Stop smoking, fasten your seat belts, empty your fountain pens. Because after two gulps, you seriously consider yourself capable of straightening out Chinese fire drills”

Think of this as almost a fatigue green colored variation of a sidecar. It’s a strange-looking cocktail because of its color, but it’s delicious. The leatherneck easily holds its own against other more pretentious drinks. The exact recipe from Bottom’s Up is this:

  • Juice 1/2 Lime
  • 3 parts Four Roses Rye Whisky
  • 1 part Bols Blue Curaçao
  • Ice
  • Shake well. Strain into cocktail glass

1/2 a lime will typically give you around 1/2 an ounce (15 mLs) of lime juice. Unfortunately, the recipe is a mix of quantifiable volumes and ratios. Usually, it’s one or the other, but not both. Technically you could mix three whole bottles of whisky, one bottle of curaçao, and the juice of 1/2 a lime, and the recipe would still be valid, but obviously, that’s not what they were getting at. One way to read it is 3 oz (90 mLs) whisky and 1 oz (30 mLs) orange liqueur, but that mixed with the lime juice and melted ice would result in a drink that is around 6 oz (180 mLs) and that’s massive. Typically a sour like this is always 2 oz (60 mLs) base spirit. That would make this 2 oz (60 mLs) whisky, 2/3 oz (20 mLs) Blue orange liqueur, and 1/2 oz (15 mLs) lime juice. That makes for a good and well-balanced cocktail.

What Is The Difference Between Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, And Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, triple sec, and curaçao are all the same products. They are all orange liqueurs. The reason for the different names is purely a marketing and product differentiation. The Dutch first started producing orange liqueur using laraha oranges from the Caribbean island of curaçao somewhere in the 17th century. Sometime later, several French companies began producing orange liqueur too, and to make their product sound more exotic, bols (the Dutch brand) began marketing theirs as Orange curaçao. In the 1850s, Cointreau came on to the scene and began selling their premium dry orange liqueur. Cointreau advertised that their base spirit (brandy) was filtered three times for clarity and neutrality to give their product a clean, crisp orange flavor. They called their product “Triple Sec,” which translates into English as three times dry. Cheap competitor quickly copied their branding and began calling their orange liqueurs triple sec. Cointreau later deemed the name triple sec had become chavey/tarnished and changed it back to simply orange liqueur. In an already confusing and oversaturated market, dyes were added to make one’s product stand out on the shelf next to other bottles. That is why orange liqueur goes by three different names and comes in every spectrum color.

What If I Don’t Have Blue Curaçao?

Specific to this cocktail, the leatherneck gets its color from blue orange liqueur/blue curaçao. For clarification on the difference, read my history of orange liqueur above. If you do not have blue curaçao, then sub it with clear orange liqueur and half a drop of blue food coloring. That would give you the same results.

The Leather Neck Collar.

The name leatherneck is a slang term for a US Marine. The leather neck collar dates back to the original Continental Marine uniform used during the American colonial period. It was essentially the same as the royal marine uniform used by the British other than the colors. American colonists were technically British citizens and shared many of the same customs and products. This included their military uniforms. Americans differentiated their uniforms by making them blue instead of the standard British red. One of these British carryovers was the decorative stiff leather collar worn to keep the soldier’s head straight and high. It was primarily decorative despite tales of it being used to protect a soldier from getting stabbed in the neck. It was used to elevate the image of both the Royal Marines and Continental Marines by making the men look more impressive.

Marines began to be referred to as leathernecks around the reformation of the Marines Corps in 1798, as their new uniform clung to tradition and still incorporated the old British leather collar. The leather collar lasted until 1872 when it was finally removed from the uniform. The uniform’s leather collar was so tied to the image of the Marine Corps that it survived the 1833, 1839, and 1859 uniform revisions. Today the leather collar is symbolically represented in the high stiff collar of the Marine formal graduation jacket.

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Leatherneck

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Leatherneck cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2/3 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange Liqueur.
  • Add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


La Water – Make This Strangely Good Green Cocktail

LA Water Cocktail
LA Water Cocktail

A friend of mine suggested I add this cocktail, and while the stuffy pretentious drinker in me turns up its nose to modern cocktails like this, the laid-back, chill me loves drinks like this. I have no idea who first made this, they are most likely still young and still alive, but I will take a wild guess and say it was first mixed somewhere in LA. The joke is that this funky-colored drink is supposed to look like tap water in Los Angeles. I get that the joke is that the water is gross and funky, but if the tap water there tasted like this, I would move to LA and never look back. No, it’s not vintage, but it’s super good.

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La Water

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a strong and tasty LA Water cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Midori

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange liqueur.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Singapore Sling – Make Ngiam Tong Boon’s Original 1915 Recipe

Singapore Sling
Singapore Sling

The History Of The Singapore Sling.

The Singapore sling was invented in 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon while working at the Long Bar in the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. The Singapore Sling was listed as a simple gin sling on the cocktail menu, but its uniqueness garnered it the nickname of the Singapore Sling. Like Henry Ramos thought of his famous cocktail as standard gin fizz, the rest of the world saw it as a Ramos gin fizz.

Early cocktail history from Singapore is almost non-existent. The earliest documentation of the Singapore Sling comes from the 1939 “The Gentleman’s Companion, An Exotic Drinking Book,” where author Charles Baker jr. recounts his wild drinking adventures in 1920s Southeast Asia. The book’s structure is terrible and reads more like a man stroking his ego than a cocktail book, but It’s incredible a book like this exists. There are some fantastic and unique drinks in it I would like to incorporate when I have the time. In the book, Charles Baker jr. tells a story about him and a friend drinking Singapore Slings at the Hotel Raffles in 1926. The recipe he provides is substantially different from what you will find today. Different from the ones sold at the Ruffles Hotel today. The recipe he gives is more like a traditional sling, whereas most modern recipes are tiki-like. Not quite a traditional sling, but close enough. In the 1800s, Slings were another name for a toddy, and most 19th and early 20th-century cocktail books grouped the two. If you would like a detailed account of sling and toddy history, check out the “The History of Sling Cocktails” section below.

According to Charles Baker, Ngiam Tong Boon’s original recipe was equal parts dry gin, cherry brandy, and benedictine, shaken together and poured into a highball glass with ice. The drink was then topped off with soda water (that’s the weird part. A traditional sling uses standard water) and garnished with a lime peel.

What Does The Singapore Sling Taste Like?

The Singapore sling is herbal, boozy, lightly sweet, and refreshing. It’s more similar to a Japanese highball than a sweet tiki cocktail. It’s delicious and something I can easily drink 2 or 3 of. The primary flavor in this is the Benedictine, while the other two spirits add backbone and fortification to the Singapore Sling. I vastly prefer this original Singapore Sling to the contemporary versions of it.

Is The Singapore Sling Tiki?

The original Singapore sling is not a tiki cocktail, but the modern recipes are tiki-like. The original Singapore Sling is mostly sling-like (technically, it should be classified as a highball), and over time it evolved into the juice and syrup-filled cocktail it is today. I have a feeling the Singapore Sling recipes filled with pineapple juice, grenadine, and such that we are used to today were invented in the tiki world.

The History Of Sling Cocktails.

Slings are a very old style of cocktail. Even in Harry Johnson’s 1888 edition of The Bartenders Manual, he comments under the cold whiskey sling that “This is an old-fashioned drink generally called for by old gentlemen.” The oldest cocktail book I could find to have a sling recipe is the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas. He has three recipes for both hot and cold slings. Interestingly enough, he groups both slings with toddies. The only difference is slings have nutmeg grated on top, and toddies do not. Often most early cocktails started as medicinal drinks, and the brandy and gin sling appear in a few medical journals from the 1830s.

In the August 1832 Boston medical and surgical journal, on page 15, the author notes giving a patient 1 to 5 grains of opium with a hot brandy sling to treat spotted fever and malignant cholera. Further linking its history to toddies, I found a September 1845 court case of the Massachusetts Commonwealth vs. Chester R. White. He sold a toddy/sling to a Mr. Edwin T. Rogers without a spirituous liquor license. Mr. White argued that it contained an ingredient that was a spirit, but the mixed drink itself was not a spirit. Mr. White did not win the case, but the court documents’ wording of the drink is essential.

“It was sold in the form of gin and brandy, mixed with sugar and water so as to make what is called a toddy or sling.”

The court documents recognize toddies and slings as analogous to each other. In a case about the exact definition of a spirituous beverage, the court referred to the same drink as being called both a toddy or sling. Seventeen years later, Jerry Thomas would see toddies and slings as the same thing, and so did this court. This makes sense too. If you check out my Hot Toddy article, I describe how in the 18-century, toddies were used to administer medicines. Sling appears to be a later way of describing a toddy as a drink one throws back. I assume that this is perhaps due to how people often quickly drink medicine to avoid undesirable flavors. Etymologically the word sling entered English from the old Norse word “Slyngva,” which means to throw or knockdown, and this is the more common usage, but about the drink, the word sling comes from the German word “Schlingen,” which means to swallow. Webster’s American dictionary dates this usage of the word to have entered the American dialect around 1807.

The more popular Singapore Sling and Straits Sling bear no resemblance to the traditional sling. It seems they were referring to them as slings to be more for fun alliteration than to refer to how the drink should be consumed.

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Singapore Sling

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Singapore
Servings

1

servings
Calories

259

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Singapore Sling.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Kirschwasser

  • 1 oz Benedictine

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into a glass with ice.
  • Top off with soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Holland Cocktail – Make Original 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Holland Cocktail
Holland Cocktail

One of the old classics from Jerry Thomas, the Holland Cocktail is one of the few gin cocktails made with Genever before Old Tom Gin, and London Dry became popular. Dating back to the 1800s, this cocktail was first published in Jerry Thomas’s first edition of the Bartender’s Guide in 1862. A modified or improved version of this would be printed two years after Jerry Thomas’s death in the 1887 edition.

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Holland Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Holland Cocktail from the mid 1800s

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Genever

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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East India Cocktail – Make The Classic 1882 Harry Johnson Recipe

East India Cocktail
East India Cocktail

This is cocktail #175 in Harry Johnson’s 1882 print of the Bartenders Manual. Harry Johnson was a German-born (Specifically Prussian-born, A unified Germany didn’t exist yet) bartender and peered at Jerry Thomas. Jerry Thomas does steal a lot of Harry Johnson’s thunder since he was the first one to be published, but both created amazing recipes. Since Harry Johnson was german-born, his books are written in English and German.

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East India Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

232

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1882 East India Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.