Satan’s Whiskers – Original Recipe

Satan's Whiskers Cocktail

Satan’s Whiskers

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Satan’s Whiskers.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Satan’s Whiskers Taste Like?

This is a very herbal and orange-flavored cocktail. It’s good, but it reminds me of a solid and herbal screwdriver or calvados cocktails. So if that sounds good to you, then the satan’s whiskers is right up your alley.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

Opened in 1893 The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American style cocktails in London to the British upperclass. The American Bar has always been a high end bar but what really set it on the map was when Harry CraddoIn 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book. ck became it’s head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high end hotel bars, but Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the american prohibition was coming to an end the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar and a year later they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934 The Savoy Cocktail Book documents all of the bars best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era, European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there though. A cocktail cost around $250 there and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Manhattan – Original Recipe & History

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Cocktail

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a pre-prohibition style Manhattan cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 10 – 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into a glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed lemon peel

Recipe Video

Notes

Featured Video

The History of The Manhattan.

The Manhattan most people think of when they order a Manhattan today is the post-prohibition style Manhattan. Bourbon, sweet vermouth, and angostura bitters. An excellent pairing of flavors, but had you ordered a Manhattan from the 1880s to 1919, you would have been served this cocktail instead. The oldest printed reference to the manhattan cocktail I can find is from August 31, 1882, Crawford Avalanche newspaper of Michigan and the December 4, 1883, Evening Star newspaper of Washington DC. The bartender interviewed in the Crawford newspaper mentions that he was the first to introduce “Manhattan cocktails” to the area, and he likes to make his with “whiskey, vermouth, and bitters” The bartender in the DC newspaper says he pre-batches them with gin and vermouth. Both newspapers refer to a new Manhattan style of cocktail currently in vogue and talk about it as if it is a style rather than a specific drink. A few years later, both newspaper and cocktail books seem to have settled on the Manhattan as specifically a whiskey cocktail. This Manhattan recipe is pulled from the 1887 Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide. This is the oldest printing I could find from a cocktail recipe book. The Manhattan remained unchanged until 1919, as documented in the Old Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, which reported all their recipes from 1897 to 1919.

The two changes that changed the Manhattan from its pre-prohibition to post-prohibition form are changing from Boker’s bitters to Angostura bitters and no longer adding two dashes of orange liqueur. The recipe changed from using Boker’s bitters because the Boker’s company, which was already struggling financially by the 1910s, completely closed its doors around the start of prohibition. Those who knew the secret recipe took it to their graves. I believe in the mid-2000s, an old unopened bottle of Boker’s was found in a recently deceased man’s attic. The mixture was reverse engineered, and it was discovered to be primarily cardamom, cinnamon, and orange peel bitter. You are now able to find cardamom bitters made in the Boker’s style, but for almost 90 years, the closest anyone could get was using Angostura Bitters. The second change was removing the two dashes of orange liqueur. This change had more to do with the transition from pre-prohibition mixing ideologies to the prohibition era and post-prohibition mixing ideologies. The hallmark of pre-prohibition mixing ideology was to take a decent base spirit and add complexity and flavor with small amounts of bitters and liqueurs, with the base spirit still the most forward element. Prohibition-era and post-prohibition mixing ideology shifted to making flavorful cocktails where the base spirit blended in with the sodas or liqueurs. Not to say these styles were exclusive to any period, but there was a definite shift in what was popular and sold.

I cannot find any specific genesis of the Manhattan or who maybe created it. Often with very old cocktails, the creators were never credited, and many people claim they invented the drink. I can’t find any reference to it before the 1880s, and it was most likely created in New York. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was trendy to name drinks after cities or popular locations in New York. This is what gives us cocktails like the Bronx, the Oyster Bay, Brooklyn, etc. So there is no real reason it’s called a Manhattan other than being a famous New York cocktail naming convention of its time.

What Does The Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Taste Like?

Bourbon and Sweet Vermouth are a match made in heaven. The two ingredients’ flavor profiles pair perfectly. The sweet vermouth adds just enough sweetness to soften the bourbon, and the bourbon adds just enough sharp toasted oak volume and flavor to bring down the vermouth’s solid herbal notes. A few dashes of orange liqueur and cardamon bitters add a nice gentle citrus and spice complexity to the cocktail that Angostura bitters do not provide. These are all wonderful ingredients, and combined; they make a wonderfully sweet and spicy cocktail. I like the modern Angostura bitters Manhattan better, but this one is also tasty. If I were to equate the two to sipping spirits, I would say the original pre-prohibition one is like sipping rye whiskey, and the current one everyone knows it is like sipping bourbon.

What Is The Difference Between The Manhattan And The Old Fashioned?

Whether it’s the pre-prohibition or post-prohibition style, the Manhattan and old fashion are, for the most part, very similar cocktails. The main difference between the two is since the old-fashioned uses simple syrup/gum syrup to cut the strength of the bourbon; the taste is still a very clean, bourbon forward cocktail. On the other hand, the Manhattan comes across with a more mild bourbon taste that is balanced against a lightly sweet herbal flavor. So the Manhattan is a slightly sweetened bourbon and herbal flavored cocktail, and the old fashion is a somewhat sweeter but clean bourbon tasting cocktail.

Get The Sweet Vermouth Right.

The most essential ingredients in the pre-prohibition style Manhattan are the sweet vermouth and the cardamom bitters. Boker’s Bitters was one of the quintessential tastes of the 1800s cocktail, and you can finally get that flavor again with cardamom bitters. It’s like tasting history. A little bit more than the bitters, though, is the sweet vermouth. Vermouth is the defining flavor of this cocktail, and for not much more, you can buy some fantastic sweet vermouths. There isn’t a “bad” sweet vermouth, the cheap stuff is still pretty good, but for five bucks more, you can buy some fantastic top-shelf vermouths that will elevate this cocktail to new heights.

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Margarita – Original Recipe & History

Margarita

Margarita – Original 1937 Recipe

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Margarita.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes

The History Of The Margarita.

This is the tequila variation of the Sidecar, and while it is heavily associated with Mexico, The oldest known recipe for it is from Britain. The Oldest known recipe is from the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book by William J. Tarling of London. The Cafe Royal has the EXACT recipe for a margarita, but it’s called the Picador and not the Margarita (Margarita is the Spanish word for a daisy flower).

I’ve heard the argument that since it’s not called the margarita, it’s not a margarita, but the recipe is precisely a margarita, and regardless of the name, the actual drink is more important. To William Tarling’s credit, the Cafe Royal was well known as a more experimental high-end bar that used exotic spirits, liqueurs, and juices. Tequila would be seen as exotic in 1930s England, and the book has not 1 but 14 different tequila recipes. I couldn’t find another cocktail book with that many tequila cocktails until the 1970s.

The first use of the name margarita comes from the December 1953 issue of Esquire Magazine. Their drink of the month section on page 76 says, “She’s from Mexico, and her name is the Margarita cocktail — She is lovely to look at, exciting and provocative.” The Esquire recipe is:

  • 1 oz Tequila
  • Dash of triple sec
  • Juice of half a lime or lemon
  • Pour over crushed ice, stir. Rub the rim of a stem glass with rind of lemon or lime, spin on salt, and sip.

Notably, Esquire was the first to add a salted rim to the cocktail, and their proportions are much sourer than the Cafe Royals.

Should I Use Margarita Mix, Sweet And Sour, Or Orange Liqueur And Citrus?

Margarita mix and Sweet and sour are the same things. The name sweet and sour is to sell the same product to people looking to make a drink other than just a margarita. The truth is they are all kind of crap. Some are better than others, but most of those cost between 25-30 USD, and at those prices, you might as well get the real stuff and buy Cointreau. Also, combining equal parts of orange liqueur and lime juice is already so easy that buying pre-mix is not beneficial.

The other consideration is which orange liqueur to buy. The market is over-saturated, and the selection is overwhelming. Cheap orange liqueur is often pretty gross, and if my option were a cheap orange liqueur or margarita mix, I would get the margarita mix. I love a deal, but orange liqueur is one of those items where you get what you pay for. Price-wise, about 20 and up, they taste pretty good. The next thing to consider is whether to get one made with an aged base spirit or not. Grand Marnier is made with an aged brandy, and Cointreau is not. Orange liqueurs made with an aged base spirit tend to be more mellow and easier to sip straight. If you like drinking cordials, then Grand Marnier would be a choice. Un-aged base spirits tend to have more robust, more crisp flavors. The orange flavor in orange liqueurs like Cointreau is rich and clean. It all comes down to your personal preferences. Cointreau mixes better in almost all cocktails and makes a fantastic margarita. It’s also the most expensive, but as I said earlier, you get what you pay for when buying orange liqueur, and the cost is typically proportional to quality.

What Is The Difference Between Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, And Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, triple sec, and curaçao are all the same products. They are all orange liqueurs. The reason for the different names is purely a marketing and product differentiation. The Dutch first started producing orange liqueur using Laraha oranges from the Caribbean island of curaçao somewhere in the 17th century. Sometime later, several French companies began producing orange liqueur too, and to make their product sound more exotic, Bols (the Dutch brand) began marketing theirs as Orange curaçao. In the 1850s, Cointreau came on to the scene and began selling their premium dry orange liqueur. Cointreau advertised that their base spirit (brandy) was filtered three times for clarity and neutrality to give their product a clean, crisp orange flavor. They called their product “Triple Sec,” which translates into English as three times dry. Cheap competitor quickly copied their branding and began calling their orange liqueurs triple sec. Cointreau later deemed the name triple sec had become chavey/tarnished and changed it back to simply orange liqueur. In an already confusing and oversaturated market, dyes were added to make one’s product stand out on the shelf next to other bottles. That is why orange liqueur goes by three different names and comes in every spectrum color.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

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Lemon Drop Martini – Original Recipe & History

Lemon Drop Martini

Lemon Drop Martini

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

235

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Lemon Drop Martini.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Vodka

Directions

  • First, garnish the glass with a sugar-crusted rim.
  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes

The Lemon Drop Martini And Henry Africa’s Bar.

The Lemon Drop Martini was invented at Henry Africa’s Bar in the early 1970s. Henry Africa’s Bar first opened in 1969 on Broadway and Polk in San Francisco and two years later moved a block over to Van Ness Avenue and Vallejo. The unusual interior design and styling Norman Hobday used with Henry Africa eventually became known as a Fern Bar. The fern bar style uses a bright open layout. Stained glass windows let in the sun, and Tiffany lamps and chandeliers decorate the space. Lush plants and abundant use of ferns provide vegetation, and patrons sit at their tables on victorian loveseats. Norman Hobday (who, a few years later, legally changed his name to Henry Africa) created the fern bar style with the idea of catering to women.

Most bars, pubs, sports bars, etc., have a male vibe and tend to attract men wanting to go out and have a few drinks with their other male friends. Norman Hobday gave Henry Africa’s Bar a female vibe instead. The decorations, brunch menu, and bright sugary drinks made for a bar women would hopefully choose to meet up at and chat. Hobday even wore his old military uniform around the bar and called himself Corporal Henry Africa. There is a famous photo of him in the 80s wearing a military hat and jacket with little short shorts and sneakers. One of the most popular things to come out of his fern bar was the Lemon Drop Martini. A sweet and tart cocktail that fits the location it was invented. The Lemon Drop is a fantastic cocktail that reminds me of a classic Cuban daiquiri, more sweet than sour but very good.

Hobday sold Henry Africa’s Bar in 1985, and the bar closed in 1986. Hobday went on to open other bars in San Francisco till his passing in 2011 at the age of 77. If you search Henry Africa’s Bars brunch or menus, there are a few old archived articles by the Washington Post and others from the 1970s and 80s that are fun to read.

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Oyster Bay – Classic Recipe

Oyster Bay

Oyster Bay

2 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

194

kcal
ABV

35%

Total time

3

minutes

While not the prettiest cocktail its actually pretty good.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 2 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 tsp Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

This drink is most likely named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, whose home is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During the earlier days of mixing, there was a trend on the east coast to name drinks after regions of New York. If the oyster was a crayon color, one could also say it had an oyster color. Don’t be put off by the strange color of this drink because it’s pretty good.

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Brandy Daisy – Original Recipe & History

Brandy Daisy Cocktail

Brandy Daisy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Brandy Daisy.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 3 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 tsp Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Brandy Daisy

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and add the soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Daisy Style Cocktail.

The daisy was another early cocktail style emerging around the same time as the crusta and many other early standard sour cocktails. The Daisy is essentially a crusta with an ounce of soda water to cut the intensity and make the cocktail more refreshing. First appearing in the 1862 edition of the bartender’s guide by Jerry Thomas, The daisy is a beautiful cocktail if you find the standard sour is a bit too strong.

What Does The Brandy Daisy Taste Like?

The Brandy Daisy is a beautiful little cocktail that adds a bit of refreshing soda water to a delicious sour cocktail. The small amount of Orange Liqueur adds a pleasant orange flavor on top of the citrus. The primary flavor is still brandy, and the subtle flavors of the brandy shine through in this cocktail.

A Nice Brandy Taste Better In This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is the brandy you use. I don’t often use fine sipping spirits for cocktails. Still, the proportion of the other ingredients is so small that a nicer, more mellow brandy makes for a better-balanced drink where you can still appreciate the subtleties of a nicer brandy. The brandy daisy is a beautiful drink, but it’s not for everyone. If you love brandy and find the sidecar cocktail too sweet, this is the cocktail for you.

Recipe Resources

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Old Tom Cocktail – Classic Recipe & History

Old Tom Cocktail

Old Tom Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

267

kcal
ABV

37%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Old Tom cocktail from the 1862 edition of the bartenders guide by Jerry Thomas. 

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 2 oz Old Tom Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

The Old Tom Cocktail is another classic 1800s cocktail from Jerry Thomas’s 1862 bartending guide. Whether it’s the Old Tom Cocktail, Whiskey Cocktail, Brandy Cocktail, Gin Cocktail, etc., they all are the same except for a different base spirit. If you’re a fan of the Old Fashion but curious to vary it up a little with a different spirit, give it a try.

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Long Beach Iced Tea – Original Recipe & History

Long Beach Iced Tea

Long Beach Ice Tea

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

545

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Long Beach Iced Tea.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Sweet and Sour Mix

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Vodka

  • 1 oz White Rum

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1.5 oz Cranberry Juice

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients into a shaker.
  • Add a scoop of crushed ice and shake for 5 seconds.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all and serve.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Long Beach Iced Tea Taste Like?

Using Cranberry juice instead of coca-cola completely changes this cocktail. The flavor is bright and fruity, giving it an almost refreshing taste. It’s hard to say 4.5 oz of alcohol in one drink is refreshing, but cranberry juice softens it. The Long Beach Iced Tea recipe is exactly like the traditional Long Island Iced Tea except for the cranberry juice. The recipe I have provided uses Robert “Rosebud” Butt’s original Long Island recipe but substitutes the Coke for cranberry juice.

The History Of The Long Island Iced Tea

The Long Beach Iced Tea was invented by T.G.I. Fridays in 1980 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of its parent company Carlson. T.G.I. Fridays is often mistaken for inventing the Long Island Iced Tea, and while they didn’t, It is still one of the most popular drinks they sell. Although T.G.I. Fridays did create several popular variations. They made four variations: the Sparkling Iced Tea, the Long Beach Iced Tea, the Caribbean Iced Tea, and the Texas Iced Tea. The Sparkling Iced Tea replaced the Coca-Cola with champagne. The Long Beach Iced Tea replaced Coca-Cola with cranberry juice. The Caribbean Iced Tea used blue-orange liqueur instead of clear to give the drink a light green color and left out the Coke. And the Texas Ice Tea added an additional ounce of whiskey.

I understand this is supposed to be a vintage cocktail resource, and while T.G.I. Fridays is not seen as a high-end bar today, it once was. The first T.G.I. Fridays was opened in 1965 by Alan Stillman. Stillman lived on 63rd Street between First and York in New York and, while surrounded by single attractive working women, had a hard time meeting any. Alan liked to go out after work, and believe it or not, many bars in the 1960s still had policies that no women could enter unless they were with a man. Hell, women couldn’t have bank accounts until the 1960s, and it wasn’t the Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974 that women could get an account without a father or husband to manage it. But back to cocktails. Obviously, not every bar was like this, and some areas were more progressive than others, but there was still a culture of bars being too rough for single vulnerable women. Some high-end bars excluded single women, fearing their presence would distract business-minded men from making deals. Even though prohibition had helped lessen the stigma of women publicly drinking, it still took activists like Betty Friedan and others to fully break down these barriers. Alan Stillman also helped break down these barriers when he opened T.G.I. Fridays, one of the United States’ first singles bar. The original intent of T.G.I Fridays was to offer a welcoming environment that felt like home where single women and men could meet. Women didn’t need to come with a man to enter. They served high-end drinks and well-made American food. Stillman may have been looking to meet women, but he inadvertently helped bring down some of the social barriers American women faced.

Recipe Resources

Long Beach Iced Tea Article

Original Long Island Iced Tea Recipe

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Leatherneck – Original Recipe & History

Leatherneck

Leatherneck

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Leatherneck cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2/3 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange Liqueur.
  • Add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes

The Leatherneck Cocktail History

First Published in Ted Saucier’s 1951 book “Bottoms Up”, the author credits the Leatherneck creation to Frank Farrell. Frank was a former WWII Marine and a columnist for the New York World Telegram and Sun and McNaught Syndicate when he came up with the Leatherneck. Above the cocktail, it reads:

“Shake violently on the rocks and serve in cocktail glass… Stop smoking, fasten your seat belts, empty your fountain pens. Because after two gulps, you seriously consider yourself capable of straightening out Chinese fire drills”

Think of this as almost a fatigue green colored variation of a sidecar. It’s a strange-looking cocktail because of its color, but it’s delicious. The leatherneck easily holds its own against other more pretentious drinks. The exact recipe from Bottom’s Up is this:

  • Juice 1/2 Lime
  • 3 parts Four Roses Rye Whisky
  • 1 part Bols Blue Curaçao
  • Ice
  • Shake well. Strain into cocktail glass

1/2 a lime will typically give you around 1/2 an ounce (15 mLs) of lime juice. Unfortunately, the recipe is a mix of quantifiable volumes and ratios. Usually, it’s one or the other, but not both. Technically you could mix three whole bottles of whisky, one bottle of curaçao, and the juice of 1/2 a lime, and the recipe would still be valid, but obviously, that’s not what they were getting at. One way to read it is 3 oz (90 mLs) whisky and 1 oz (30 mLs) orange liqueur, but that mixed with the lime juice and melted ice would result in a drink that is around 6 oz (180 mLs) and that’s massive. Typically a sour like this is always 2 oz (60 mLs) base spirit. That would make this 2 oz (60 mLs) whisky, 2/3 oz (20 mLs) Blue orange liqueur, and 1/2 oz (15 mLs) lime juice. That makes for a good and well-balanced cocktail.

What Is The Difference Between Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, And Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, triple sec, and curaçao are all the same products. They are all orange liqueurs. The reason for the different names is purely a marketing and product differentiation. The Dutch first started producing orange liqueur using laraha oranges from the Caribbean island of curaçao somewhere in the 17th century. Sometime later, several French companies began producing orange liqueur too, and to make their product sound more exotic, bols (the Dutch brand) began marketing theirs as Orange curaçao. In the 1850s, Cointreau came on to the scene and began selling their premium dry orange liqueur. Cointreau advertised that their base spirit (brandy) was filtered three times for clarity and neutrality to give their product a clean, crisp orange flavor. They called their product “Triple Sec,” which translates into English as three times dry. Cheap competitor quickly copied their branding and began calling their orange liqueurs triple sec. Cointreau later deemed the name triple sec had become chavey/tarnished and changed it back to simply orange liqueur. In an already confusing and oversaturated market, dyes were added to make one’s product stand out on the shelf next to other bottles. That is why orange liqueur goes by three different names and comes in every spectrum color.

What If I Don’t Have Blue Curaçao?

Specific to this cocktail, the leatherneck gets its color from blue orange liqueur/blue curaçao. For clarification on the difference, read my history of orange liqueur above. If you do not have blue curaçao, then sub it with clear orange liqueur and half a drop of blue food coloring. That would give you the same results.

The Leather Neck Collar.

The name leatherneck is a slang term for a US Marine. The leather neck collar dates back to the original Continental Marine uniform used during the American colonial period. It was essentially the same as the royal marine uniform used by the British other than the colors. American colonists were technically British citizens and shared many of the same customs and products. This included their military uniforms. Americans differentiated their uniforms by making them blue instead of the standard British red. One of these British carryovers was the decorative stiff leather collar worn to keep the soldier’s head straight and high. It was primarily decorative despite tales of it being used to protect a soldier from getting stabbed in the neck. It was used to elevate the image of both the Royal Marines and Continental Marines by making the men look more impressive.

Marines began to be referred to as leathernecks around the reformation of the Marines Corps in 1798, as their new uniform clung to tradition and still incorporated the old British leather collar. The leather collar lasted until 1872 when it was finally removed from the uniform. The uniform’s leather collar was so tied to the image of the Marine Corps that it survived the 1833, 1839, and 1859 uniform revisions. Today the leather collar is symbolically represented in the high stiff collar of the Marine formal graduation jacket.

Recipe Resources

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L.A. Water – Cocktail Recipe

L.A. Water

L.A. Water

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a strong and tasty L.A. Water cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Midori

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange liqueur.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes

Featured Video

A friend of mine suggested I add this cocktail, and while the stuffy pretentious drinker in me turns up its nose to modern cocktails like this, the laid-back, chill me loves drinks like this. I have no idea who first made this, they are most likely still young and still alive, but I will take a wild guess and say it was first mixed somewhere in LA. The joke is that this funky-colored drink is supposed to look like tap water in Los Angeles. I get that the joke is that the water is gross and funky, but if the tap water there tasted like this, I would move to LA and never look back. No, it’s not vintage, but it’s super good.

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