Bijou – Make Harry Johnson Fantastic Original 1900 Recipe

Bijou Cocktail
Bijou Cocktail

The History Of The Bijou Cocktail.

This drink was invented by Harry Johnson and was first published in his 1900 edition of The Bartenders Manual. The name Bijou means jewel in French and is intended to represent the three spirits in this cocktail. The sweet vermouth represents a ruby, the chartreuse represents an emerald, and the dry gin represents a diamond. The original Harry Johnson recipe is stirred, but this cocktail can also be done pousse-café. A layered pousse-café Bijou looks very nice but doesn’t go down the easiest. I will say it’s magical to look at the side of a layered bijou and see the color of individual ingredients. If you layer this cocktail, the order to layer in is first:

  1. Sweet Vermouth
  2. Green Chartreuse
  3. Dry Gin

Layering order is pretty easy to figure out for most drinks. The sweetest item goes to the bottom, and the driest thing goes to the top. The sweet vermouth is the sweetest, so it goes on the bottom, followed by the Chartreuse, and obviously, dry gin is the driest of the three, so it goes at the top. Layering is usually determined by an ingredient’s gravity, which measures both sugar content and ABV/ABW. In practical application, though ABV is negligible, sugar content is the main contributor to gravity unless it’s 151 or some other crazy high ABV spirit. You can add grenadine to a tequila sunrise, and it drops to the bottom, but 151 will float on top of a zombie cocktail.

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Bijou

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

37%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Bijou cocktail first printed in the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual. 

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 1 oz Green Chartreuse

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Adios Motherfucker – Make The Best AMF You Will Ever Have

Adios Motherfucker Cocktail
Adios Motherfucker Cocktail

Is The AMF a Trashy Drink?

I know the name of this is Vintage American Cocktails and that this is not a vintage cocktail, but who cares. The truth is it’s a pretty good cocktail, and contrary to popular belief, it’s not that boozy. Or, if made correctly, it shouldn’t be. This cocktail has a reputation, similar to the Cosmopolitan, for being a trashy club drink young people like to order so they can say they got an Adios Motherfucker. Unfortunately, because of this connection, it’s suffered the same fate as the Cosmopolitan; A good cocktail that ordinary people are afraid to order to avoid looking trashy. Granted, its name is Adios MotherFucker, so it was destined to end up with that image. Another name is the AMF, but saying Motherfucker is a lot more fun.

The most recipe calls for sweet and sour, but the sweet and sour mix is a poor imitation of orange liqueur, sugar, and lemon juice. This version of the Adios has all the same per proportions as a more standard recipe, but by replacing the sweet and sour mix and sprite with better ingredients, you get something much better. This is an excellent version of the adios.

Adios MotherFucker Vs Long Island Ice Tea.

It’s similar to the Long Island Ice Tea in that it has almost every different kind of spirit in it. Unlike the long island, they are in small quantities, and if you’re going by ABV and structure, it’s actually more similar to a John Collins than the Long Island Ice Tea.

What is the Difference Between Cointreau, Orange Liqueur, and Blue Curacao?

Cointreau and Curacao or blue curaçao are all the same liqueur. The only difference is that Cointreau is a brand name, and Blue curaçao is a general term for an orange liqueur with added blue food dye. They are all orange liqueurs and the difference between them and other orange liqueurs like triple sec all comes down to brand names and marketing gimmicks. Bols was the first to manufacture orange liqueur using the bitter oranges from the island of Curacao, owned in the Caribbean. As orange liqueur grew in popularity in Europe, other manufacturers entered the scene. Cointreau marketed theirs as being made from a triple distilled dry beet sugar spirit base, providing a more bright, clean, orange taste. They called it Cointreau triple sec. They owned the name Cointreau but not triple sec, and soon many cheap orange liqueurs flooded the market as “triple sec” liqueurs. Some branded themselves as a “Curacao” liqueur, and others began adding bright-colored food dyes to make them stand out from the others. Cointreau eventually dropped the headline triple sec from its marketing since the term was now associated with cheaper products, but the term endures. That is a brief history of how the market became flooded with triple secs, curacaos, colored curacaos, Cointreaus, etc., that are ultimately the same ingredient but cause so much confusion for so many people. For a more in-depth history of Orange liqueur, please download my app and navigate to the orange liqueur ingredient description. links at the bottom of this page

What Does The AMF Taste Like?

The Adios Motherfucker is a great cocktail. Its taste is similar to a Collins-style cocktail, and the bright blue color is fun. Even though it has the same spirits as the Long Island Ice Tea, it tastes nothing like a Long Island. The Adios has almost a boozy sparkling lemonade taste. The sweetness and soda water helps cut the drink to a more manageable alcohol level and make it (I think) a refreshing cocktail that will still give you a slight buzz.

The Most Important ingredient.

There is no ingredient in the Adios that affects the flavor in any meaningful way. There are so many different ingredients in such small amounts that they all get lost. The only advice I have for this cocktail is not to buy Blue orange liqueur but use one drop of blue food dye instead. Unless you plan to make tons of these quickly, your best bet is to buy a normal clear orange liqueur like Cointreau and add blue dye. Because if you buy blue orange liqueur, you will be trapped into only being able to use it for this and maybe a couple of other cocktails. I have a bottle of blue curacao that I bought maybe 4 or 5 years ago, and it’s still half full.

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Adios Motherfucker

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

311

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

The best Adios Motherfucker that actually taste great.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz  Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • If you do not have blue orange liqueur then add 1 drop of blue food dye
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass and gently add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


South Side – Make The Classic 1946 Stock Club Recipe

South Side
South Side

The Origins Of The South Side.

The most popular origin story for the south side is named after Chicago’s Southside and was invented to mask the poor quality of the prohibition-era gin. This history is gripping because it ties the south side to famous prohibition mobster Al Capone who famously supplied Chicago with his “bathtub gin.” Unfortunately, this story is most likely more fun than it is true. Every city has a southside area, and the canon version of this cocktail from the Club 21 is located in lower Manhattan. So is the south side’s name referring to the Southside of Manhattan or Chicago? Who knows. Was it invented in Chicago and then popularized in New York.

To give extra weight that it is from New York, the oldest printed recipe I could find for this cocktail comes from the 1946 Stock Club Bar Book by Lucius Beebe. Their recipe is essentially a gin mojito identical to the Bar La Florida’s Mojito #2 recipe from their 1935 book. Both even serve the drink in a highball glass with ice. Granted, the south side fizz is a regular collins style cocktail, so it’s not unreasonable to think that two people just happened to come up with each drink independently of the other. I did not find this cocktail in any books coming out of Chicago in the 1930s or 1940s. I may not have checked all of them, but I matched some major ones and did not find a South Side cocktail.

Serving A South Side.

The most common way a south side is served in a cocktail glass resembling more of a sour than a highball fizz. I prefer this way, and even though the 1946 Stock Club recipe calls for it being served in a highball glass with ice. I’m going to go with the more daisy-like serving because I want to make it different from the older Cuban gin mojito mentioned above. I don’t see a point in having the same cocktail with different names so I will give that honor to the older recipe. The other reason is it’s just delicious as a daisy, and the mint makes it unique from other daisies. However, it is right and depends on whether you want a nice cool sipping cocktail or a short, strong sour.

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Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

South Side

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

219

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Classic South Side Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 3 Mint leaves

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Muddle mint leaves and simple syrup together in shaker.
  • Add the other ingredients and ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously Shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain using double strainer to remove mint bits

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.