Patricia – Dry Negroni Recipe

Patricia
Patricia

This is a dry variation of a Negroni. I like both equally and can’t say the Boulevardier is better or worse than the Patricia. It just depends on your mood.

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Patricia Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

174

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Patricia Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Campari
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

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Negroni – Classic Recipe

Negroni
Negroni

The History Of The Negroni

The familiar origin story for the Negroni, and the official story by the company that owns Campari, is it was invented in 1910s Florence, Italy, by Count Camillo Negroni. The issue with that is the only person documented to have that name was an Italian American Immigrant named Camillo Negroni, who immigrated to the United States in the 1890s. Camillo Negroni died in 1926, which could work, but it feels like a stretch. The descendants of the Negroni family that have laid claim to being the inventors say after much research that it was not Count Camillo Negroni but Pascal Olivier Count de Negroni who invented the Negroni. The problem with this story is Pascal Olivier de Negroni passed in 1913. The other issue with the family’s evidence to back this up is a newspaper clipping from 1980 saying Pascal Olivier de Negroni invented the negroni in 1914. So who knows? Both of these stories sound a little too good to be true to me, and after looking into this stuff for years, I have found that most of these neat and tight little stories are often made up.

What I find very interesting and maybe more telling about the origins of the negroni is the oldest reference I can find is from the 1951 cocktail book “Bottoms Up” by Ted Saucier. It’s not in Savoy, Cafe Royal, Trader Vic 1947, McElhone never mentions it, Embury never mentions it, Meier never mentions it. No one. There were not really any Italian cocktail books during that time. Still, the French and English bartenders who published were very aware of the cocktail scene in the rest of Europe, and none mentioned a negroni. Even published American bartenders who were aware of new cocktails in Europe never mentioned it. The official 1945 Chicago bartenders union book of standard recipes bartenders should know does not mention it. I went down my list of authors who were good at documenting and preserving cocktail history, and it was not till Ted Saucier in 1951 that I could find any mention of a negroni. For reference, the earliest boulevardier and Old Pal recipes are from the early 1920s. Another telling sign is how Saucier cites the negroni recipe in his book. He lists the recipe without citation for common and well-known cocktails, but for unique and new or less known recipes, he cites who provided him with the recipe.

Saucier provided four different negroni recipes. One from New York, two from Rome, and one from France. Both Italian recipes have soda water and look more like Americanos with a shot of gin added. The French recipe is mostly vermouth and has angostura bitters. The only one that looks like the Negroni recipe we know today is the American recipe. In the 1954 book King Cocktail by Eddie Clark (He took over as head bartender at the Savoy after Craddock), his Negroni recipe resembles the Italian ones in Saucier’s book. In the 1955 UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders’ Guild), They used the negroni recipe that resembles the American one in Saucier’s book. From this point on, every negroni recipe I found is that one.

I’m not saying the Negroni is American or that the Campari company has the history wrong. Personally speaking, though, I always found the Negroni to be an odd Italian cocktail. It doesn’t fit the drinking or eating culture of Italy. It feels more at home as an American or, even more so, as a British Cocktail. The Negroni recipes in Saucier’s Book submitted by Italian restaurants feel Italian to me. I also think they would not be well-liked in Italy, and traveling American or British customers would request Negronis made in the New York style. I also find it interesting that there was not a mention of this cocktail till the 1950s, and the earliest evidence that Mr. Negroni invented it during WWI, comes from the 1980s. Here is my personal take on how the Negroni most likely originated.

In my opinion, the Negroni was most likely invented in Italy during the mid to late 1940s. New cocktail recipes spread fast, so it’s not unreasonable to think this made its way to the rest of Europe and the Americas in just a couple of years. Through an overly alcoholic American filter, the negroni was modified to be just gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari. The soda water was removed, and this became the version most Americans knew and liked. When traveling abroad, this is how Americans requested the cocktail to be made, and in a few years, the American variation became the dominant recipe. This feels more right to me and better resembles how recipes evolve. It’s not as neat a story as “Mr. Negroni walked into a bar and ordered a Negroni,” but the true ones usually are not.

Negroni Variations

Some popular variations of the Negroni are:

Recipe Resources

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Negroni

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Italian
Servings

1

servings
Calories

186

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic and simple Negroni

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass and garnish with an orange slice

Notes

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Boulevardier – Original Recipe & History

Boulevardier Cocktail
Boulevardier Cocktail

The History Of The Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier was invented in Paris in the early 1920s by an American journalist, Erskine Gwynne. We know this because the Boulevardier was first recorded in the 1927 book Barflies and Cocktails by Harry MacElhone. In a section at the back of the book titled “Cocktails Around Town” by Arthur Moss, he states that Erskine Gwynne comes to parties making this cocktail. It’s essentially a bourbon variation of the Negroni. The word boulevardier is a French term for a wealthy, fashionable socialite man. Similar to the English term “man about town,” It is easy to mispronounce the name if you don’t speak French ( I don’t, and I had to look it up the first time I heard of this drink ), but the phonetic way to say it is “bool-ah-vard-ee-a.” If you say this wrong the first few times, you are in good company because everyone struggles with the name of this cocktail at first, so Google it to hear someone say it.

How To Order A Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier is a very cool drink to order and has tricked people into thinking I am more sophisticated than I am. The Negroni has an old man connotation, but the boulevardier is what young high-class men order. In addition, any bar can make it. Every bar, from your small average corner bar to a high-class craft bar, and you won’t look out of place ordering it either. There are very few cocktails you can say that about. So if the bar has a liquor license, they can make the boulevardier. The bartender will already know what it is, and it will be made pretty well.

What Does The Boulevardier Taste Like?

The boulevardier is a very well-balanced tasting cocktail. The bitter medicinal flavor of the Campari is complimented nicely by the herbal sweet Vermouth, with a nice caramel-y, vanilla-y bourbon base. It’s a fantastic and straightforward drink worthy of all its praise. That being said, it is not for everyone. I like strong drinks and herbal flavors, which are perfect for someone like me. On the other hand, my wife is more a Moscow Mule kind of person, and she would never want a drink like this. If you like Manhattans or Negronis, you will love it, but if you are more of a rum and coke or Moscow mule kind of person, this cocktail, b will not like the boulevardier.

Variations of the Boulevardier.

Four popular varitions of the Boulevardier are:

  • Negroni
  • Americano
  • Man About Town
  • Patricia

The boulevardier is a variation of the Negroni, which predates the boulevardier by about ten years. The Negroni has a drier and more herbal taste than the boulevardier, but they are very similar. Another variation is the Americano which predates the Negroni and is the first cocktail to use Campri. The Americano was invented by Gaspare Campari himself and was initially called the Milano-Torino. It’s a different drink, though, and is a refreshing highball with a similar flavor profile. Very few people have heard of Patricia. It swaps the sweet vermouth for dry vermouth, making it a drier and slightly more herbal version of the Negroni. I like Negronis; then you may like this too.

A Nice Vermouth Makes A World Of Difference.

The most essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and while bourbon provides a nice vanilla and toasted oak base to the drink and does matter, it’s the sweet vermouth that will make the most significant difference. The strong Campari and vermouth flavors overpower the subtle bourbon flavors. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones out there. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it oxidizes after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of them spoil before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for an average 750mLs bottle of sweet vermouth, you will end up wasting half of it anyway, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

Recipe Resources

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Boulevardier

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Boulevardier. The perfect blend of sweet and bitter aperitifs with a nice bourbon base. 

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed orange peel.

Recipe Video

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Americano – Classic Recipe & History

Americano Cocktail
Americano Cocktail

The History Of The Americano.

The Americano cocktail was invented around the mid-1860s in Milan, Italy, by Gaspare Campari. Gaspare ran around Italy trying to sell his bitter aperitif until he met his wife and settled down in Milan. Settling down in Milan, he opened up Gaspare’s Bar, where he sold his aperitif, which he also named after himself, and began mixing up the house cocktail called the Milano-Torino. Milano because that is where he produced Campari and Torino because that is the town that produced Italian sweet vermouth. As time went on, the drink became a huge hit and the drink of choice for many traveling Americans. By the early 1900s, the Milano-Torino became better known as an Americano. It is considered the predecessor to the Negroni since the Negroni was invented as a strong Americano. The difference between the Americano and its more famous younger brother, the Negroni, is the Negroni Swaps the 120ml (4 oz) of soda water for 30 mls (1 oz) of gin. This changes the cocktail from a refreshing and light highball to a boozy and more bitter lowball cocktail.

What Are Some Variations Of The Americano?

Variations of the Americano include The Negroni, The Boulevardier, The Man About Town, and the Patricia. These cocktails have a similar flavor profile to the americano but are very different in style. They are all short, strong drinks, while the Americano is tall, light, and refreshing. There is nothing quite like the americano, but these four are the most similar.

What Does the Americano Taste Like?

The Americano taste is refreshing since the soda water helps cut the bitter and herbal Aperitifs. The flavor is still very medicinal and not for everyone. If you like medicinal or herbal tastes, you may like this, but if you are someone who sticks to rum and cokes, adioses, or mules, then this may not be for you. If you are curious about trying Campari, this would be the drink to start with.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and soda water is all the same, but the sweet vermouth you use will make a big difference. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it doesn’t go well after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of it spoiled before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for a large normal bottle of sweet vermouth that you will end up wasting half off, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

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Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Americano

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

162

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic 1860s Americano. 

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Campari

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in your serving glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients and chill the glass.
  • Gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation.
  • Garnish with an orange slice.

Recipe Video

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Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.