Monkey Gland – Make This Delicious 1930s Harry MacElhone Recipe

Monkey Gland
Monkey Gland

Invented in the 1920s by Harry MacElhone, this is an iconic Prohibition-era cocktail. Most of the great prohibition cocktails were not created in the United States but other countries. It was hard to stock a bar in the States then, and the booze one did get usually trash. This one comes from Harry’s New York Bar, located in Paris, France. Established by Scottish Bartender Harry MacElhone, Harry’s New York Bar was one of the hot spots in Paris for traveling Americans who wanted to get drunk.

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Monkey Gland

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

195

kcal
ABV

22

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Monkey Gland Cocktail by Harry MacElhone.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp

  • Absinthe
  • 1 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 1.5 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1.5 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Japalac – Make This Tasty 1930s Classic Cocktail

Japalac Cocktail
Japalac Cocktail

This looks kind of like a little tiny tequila sunrise. It tastes like one, too, but just a little stronger. This drink dates back to the 1930s and is named after a super-strong, quick-dry wood stain brand.

The name seems to be a play on words, combining the racial slur for a Japanese person and the word lacquer because that brand of wood stain was made with Japan lacquer. That’s the old days for you.

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Japalac

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

16%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Japalac cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Bourbon
  • 1/2 oz

  • Grenadine

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass except the grenadine.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into serving glass and gently pour in the grenadine so it settles on the bottom.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Singapore Sling – Make Ngiam Tong Boon’s Original 1915 Recipe

Singapore Sling
Singapore Sling

The History Of The Singapore Sling.

The Singapore sling was invented in 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon while working at the Long Bar in the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. The Singapore Sling was listed as a simple gin sling on the cocktail menu, but its uniqueness garnered it the nickname of the Singapore Sling. Like Henry Ramos thought of his famous cocktail as standard gin fizz, the rest of the world saw it as a Ramos gin fizz.

Early cocktail history from Singapore is almost non-existent. The earliest documentation of the Singapore Sling comes from the 1939 “The Gentleman’s Companion, An Exotic Drinking Book,” where author Charles Baker jr. recounts his wild drinking adventures in 1920s Southeast Asia. The book’s structure is terrible and reads more like a man stroking his ego than a cocktail book, but It’s incredible a book like this exists. There are some fantastic and unique drinks in it I would like to incorporate when I have the time. In the book, Charles Baker jr. tells a story about him and a friend drinking Singapore Slings at the Hotel Raffles in 1926. The recipe he provides is substantially different from what you will find today. Different from the ones sold at the Ruffles Hotel today. The recipe he gives is more like a traditional sling, whereas most modern recipes are tiki-like. Not quite a traditional sling, but close enough. In the 1800s, Slings were another name for a toddy, and most 19th and early 20th-century cocktail books grouped the two. If you would like a detailed account of sling and toddy history, check out the “The History of Sling Cocktails” section below.

According to Charles Baker, Ngiam Tong Boon’s original recipe was equal parts dry gin, cherry brandy, and benedictine, shaken together and poured into a highball glass with ice. The drink was then topped off with soda water (that’s the weird part. A traditional sling uses standard water) and garnished with a lime peel.

What Does The Singapore Sling Taste Like?

The Singapore sling is herbal, boozy, lightly sweet, and refreshing. It’s more similar to a Japanese highball than a sweet tiki cocktail. It’s delicious and something I can easily drink 2 or 3 of. The primary flavor in this is the Benedictine, while the other two spirits add backbone and fortification to the Singapore Sling. I vastly prefer this original Singapore Sling to the contemporary versions of it.

Is The Singapore Sling Tiki?

The original Singapore sling is not a tiki cocktail, but the modern recipes are tiki-like. The original Singapore Sling is mostly sling-like (technically, it should be classified as a highball), and over time it evolved into the juice and syrup-filled cocktail it is today. I have a feeling the Singapore Sling recipes filled with pineapple juice, grenadine, and such that we are used to today were invented in the tiki world.

The History Of Sling Cocktails.

Slings are a very old style of cocktail. Even in Harry Johnson’s 1888 edition of The Bartenders Manual, he comments under the cold whiskey sling that “This is an old-fashioned drink generally called for by old gentlemen.” The oldest cocktail book I could find to have a sling recipe is the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas. He has three recipes for both hot and cold slings. Interestingly enough, he groups both slings with toddies. The only difference is slings have nutmeg grated on top, and toddies do not. Often most early cocktails started as medicinal drinks, and the brandy and gin sling appear in a few medical journals from the 1830s.

In the August 1832 Boston medical and surgical journal, on page 15, the author notes giving a patient 1 to 5 grains of opium with a hot brandy sling to treat spotted fever and malignant cholera. Further linking its history to toddies, I found a September 1845 court case of the Massachusetts Commonwealth vs. Chester R. White. He sold a toddy/sling to a Mr. Edwin T. Rogers without a spirituous liquor license. Mr. White argued that it contained an ingredient that was a spirit, but the mixed drink itself was not a spirit. Mr. White did not win the case, but the court documents’ wording of the drink is essential.

“It was sold in the form of gin and brandy, mixed with sugar and water so as to make what is called a toddy or sling.”

The court documents recognize toddies and slings as analogous to each other. In a case about the exact definition of a spirituous beverage, the court referred to the same drink as being called both a toddy or sling. Seventeen years later, Jerry Thomas would see toddies and slings as the same thing, and so did this court. This makes sense too. If you check out my Hot Toddy article, I describe how in the 18-century, toddies were used to administer medicines. Sling appears to be a later way of describing a toddy as a drink one throws back. I assume that this is perhaps due to how people often quickly drink medicine to avoid undesirable flavors. Etymologically the word sling entered English from the old Norse word “Slyngva,” which means to throw or knockdown, and this is the more common usage, but about the drink, the word sling comes from the German word “Schlingen,” which means to swallow. Webster’s American dictionary dates this usage of the word to have entered the American dialect around 1807.

The more popular Singapore Sling and Straits Sling bear no resemblance to the traditional sling. It seems they were referring to them as slings to be more for fun alliteration than to refer to how the drink should be consumed.

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Singapore Sling

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Singapore
Servings

1

servings
Calories

259

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Singapore Sling.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Kirschwasser

  • 1 oz Benedictine

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into a glass with ice.
  • Top off with soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Golden Glow – Make A Refreshing Whiskey & Rum Cocktail

Golden Glow Cocktail
Golden Glow Cocktail

How can you go wrong with this drink? It has everything good in it. It kind of toes the line between being an Old Fashion style cocktail and a Tiki drink.

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Golden Glow

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

177

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Golden Glow.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Black Rum

  • 1.5 oz Irish Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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Pink Lady – Make This Beautiful Early 1900s Cocktail

Pink Lady Cocktail
Pink Lady Cocktail

Invented somewhere around the early 1900s, this cocktail was named after a broadway show called The Pink Lady. Oddly enough, this old-time pink cocktail shares a similar history to a more modern pink cocktail, the Cosmopolitan. Both are incredible drinks that became wildly popular during their days but soon fell from favor as they became associated with being girly drinks. However, the Cosmo and Pink Lady are nothing to mess with. Both of these drinks taste amazing and will lay you out if made right. So if drinking a Pink Lady is girly, count me one of the girls.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Pink Lady

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Pink Lady.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg Whites

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Apple Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Ward 8 – Make This Amazing 1892 Locke-Ober Recipe

Ward 8 Cocktail
Ward 8 Cocktail

A variation of the Whiskey Sour, this drink is less sour and more fruity. Dating back to the late 1800s, this drink was invented in Boston at the Locke-Ober, which unfortunately closed its doors in 2012. The story goes that the cocktail was made to celebrate Martin Lomasney’s 1892 political win in Boston’s 8th political ward, but others say it was the favorite drink of Lomasney’s henchmen.

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Ward 8

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

200

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Ward 8 cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Avenue Cocktail – Delicious Classic 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail

Avenue Cocktail
Avenue Cocktail

The History Of The Avenue Cocktail.

The Avenue Cocktail was first written in London’s 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. The Author, William Tarling, is credited for creating this fantastic cocktail and many other more famous ones. The first written recipe for the margarita is from the Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. Whether he is the actual creator of the margarita is up for debate, but he is recognized as the creator of the Avenue cocktail.

What Does The Avenue Taste Like?

The Avenue is a beautiful cocktail that is both strong and balanced. The gentler mix of brandy and scotch blends well with the Passion fruit, pomegranate, and orange flavors and creates an almost European tropical cocktail. William Tarling used lesser-known and exotic ingredients, and the Avenue Cocktail displays that. At 60 mLs of the European spirit and 40 mLs of exotic tropical flavors, the Avenue has one foot in Europe and one foot in the exotic. Unfortunately, this isn’t something you can order at any bar. Most bars, even high-end ones, have probably never made this before, and passion fruit juice is not a commonly held ingredient. If you want to order this out, you will first need to ask if the bar has passion fruit juice, and if they do,eed to you will also n give them the recipe. This will most likely be one you make for yourself and friends at home.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

Balancing The Flavors Of This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in the Avenue is both brandy and scotch. This is a very mellow drink, and a smoother brandy and scotch balance the drink well. The passion fruit, grenadine, and orange liqueur are not overly assertive in this cocktail, and if you use a powerful flavored spirit for the brandy or scotch, it tips the scale too much. Though this isn’t a make or break for the drink, use it if there is brandy or scotch you like. That being said, a smoky scotch will ruin this drink. Smoke, tobacco, or peat moss flavors will not mix with the other flavors.

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Avenue Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

190

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Avenue cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Passion Fruit Juice
  • 1 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 1 tsp

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Scotch
  • 1 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Hurricane – Make This Fantastic Classic New Orleans Cocktail

Hurricane Cocktail
Hurricane Cocktail

The History Of The Hurricane.

The hurricane was invented in the 1940s during World War 2 at Pat O’Brians in New Orleans. The story goes that the folks who controlled the import of European spirits jacked the prices way up and set conditions that for each bottle of European spirits purchased, a certain amount of the more plentiful but less desirable Caribbean rums had to be bought too.

With tons of unused rum about, the owner of Pat O’Brians decided to mix a drink using as much of it as possible. The result is this massive and boozy drink with a lot of juice and sweetener to hide the whopping 120 mLs (4 oz) of rum. This will get you drunk, which is the best way to experience New Orleans.

Why Is It Called A Hurricane?

The name for the hurricane comes from the hurricane lantern, which the traditional serving glass for this drink looks like. Personally speaking, this glass looks like a standard indoor kerosene lamp. The Hurricane lamp is a cold or hot blast lantern that redirects air through tubing along the sides so high winds do not extinguish the flame. Therefore, a standard indoor kerosene lamp doesn’t have to worry about high winds and does not have this tubing. This cocktail instead uses the iconic tapered top design the kerosene lamp uses to prevent air from entering the light from the top. Not that anyone cares about the science or design of dead flame lamps, so I will end it there. I suppose ordering kerosene was not as cool sounding as ordering a hurricane.

What Does The Hurricane Taste Like?

The hurricane is a sweet, fruit juice and booze-filled cocktail that tastes heavily of passion fruit, pomegranate, and orange juice. The amount of alcohol is similar to fortified wine, but the fruit juice and sweetener mask the alcohol’s intensity perfectly. This is often associated with tiki drinks, and while not a tiki drink, it fits in well at most tiki bars. Cocktails that are seen as capital “T” tiki are cocktails invented by either Donn Beach (Don The Beachcomber) or Victor Bergeron (Trader Vic’s), and those tend to emphasize exotic fruit, nuts, and or spice flavors. The hurricane does check off the exotic fruit flavors box but does not have any of the typical spice or nut flavors most tiki cocktails have. Regardless it is an outstanding cocktail that tastes as good as it looks.

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Hurricane

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

405

kcal
ABV

17%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic Hurricane cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 2 oz Black Rum

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a few turns to chill and mix.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.