Planters Punch #3 – Trader Vic’s Delicious 1972 Recipe

Planters Punch 3
Planters Punch 3

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Trader Vic’s 1972 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

I include this one because it’s pretty on point. Like the others, it has a citrus, syrup (including grenadine), and rum. But something Victor Bergeron brought back that most other versions lack, but classic punches have water. Also, in his 1972 book, he has a special section for this cocktail where he includes six different recipes and says there is no such thing as a proper Planter’s punch. He mentions people coming into the bar trying to educate him on what makes an authentic Planter’s Punch. Each one is different, and Vic lays out that there is a Planter’s Punch for every island in the Caribbean.

  • 1/2 oz (15 mLs) Lime Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Dark Simple Syrup
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Soda Water

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

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Planter’s Punch – 1972 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

161

kcal
ABV

13%

Total time

3

minutes

Make Trader Vic’s 1970s Planters Punch

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Dark Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Shake the shaker only a little since soda water will be added.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all.
  • Top off with soda water.

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Planters Punch #2 – The Fantastic 1933 Cuban Recipe

Planters Punch 2
Planters Punch 2

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Bar La Florida’s 1933 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

The Cuban versions are the first recipes I can find where grenadine is used, and it more closely resembles the Planter’s punch most people think of. Also, both Bar La Florida and Sloppy Joes have the same ingredients, but the recipe’s proportions vary a bit so I would consider this type the overall Cuban version of the planter’s punch. Bar La Florida’s seems a bit sweeter, and that’s the one I’m printing here.

  • 1/2 oz (15 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Orange Liqueur
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

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Planter’s Punch – 1933 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

154

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a Cuban style planter’s punch

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 barspoon Grenadine

  • 1 barspoon Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

Directions

  • Combine into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all

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Picon Punch – Strong Modern Picon Punch Recipe

Picon Punch Strong
Picon Punch Strong

The History Of The Picon Punch.

If you have not heard of this, it’s not surprising. It’s primarily made in the western side of the United States and is popular in parts of California and Nevada with large Basque immigrant populations. If you go to Basque areas in northern Spain, they will have no idea what this is. Most of the histories I have found on this credit its creation to the Noriega Hotel in Bakersfield, California. Although I think that was more just a story used by the hotel. The earliest printed reference of the Picon Punch is from the 1900 book “Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. It’s the first recipe listed in “miscellaneous and unclassified drinks” and is called an Amer Picon. The drink is labeled as already being a popular beverage in France, and that makes a lot more sense to me than it was invented in Bakersfield, California, during the end of the 19th century. The part I found most difficult to imagine was that a small hotel in Bakersfield was using grenadine before 1900.

The most popular red fruit syrup in the US before 1900 was raspberry syrup. William Boothby was the first American bartender to print recipes using grenadine. Grenadine first started being used in France and England around 1890; in his 1891 edition of the book, the Amer Picon cocktail does not use grenadine but orgeat. The change from orgeat to grenadine makes sense, too, with grenadine’s explosive popularity in France during that decade. Check out my grenadine article for its history and use in cocktails.

The hotel was founded in 1893, so that would have given them plenty of time to use Amer Picon before it stopped being imported to the US in 1920, but I don’t buy that it was invented there. The use of grenadine and references to its recipe many years before its origin story says it was created point to it being traditionally a French cocktail.

This is not the classic Picon Punch, but a strong variation served without ice in a cocktail glass. Both the traditional and this version are delicious, but they have different intents. This strong version transforms the refreshing Picon Punch into a classic-style cocktail.

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Picon Punch (Strong Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Picon Punch Strong.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Amer Picon

  • 2/3 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients. Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly add the soda water.

Notes


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Grenadine – Make This Amazing Traditional Grenadine

Grenadine
Grenadine

What is Grenadine?

Grenadine is a simple pomegranate syrup, and it originated in Persia (modern-day Iran), where it is called Rob-e-anar and is a traditional ingredient in some Persian dishes. In Persian cooking, it is boiled down to a molasses-like thickness, but when used in cocktails, the thinner syrup viscosity mixes easier. The word grenadine comes from the French word for pomegranate, grenade. During the 19th century, pomegranate syrup was mainly unknown in the United States, yet syrups made from raspberries and strawberries were much more common in drinks. Grenadine starts to get popular as a cocktail ingredient in the US around the 20th century. Some of the first grenadine cocktails appear in George Kappeler’s (Of the New York’s Holland House Hotel) 1895 Modern American Drinks and Louis Fouquet’s 1896 Bariana. Grenadine most likely started as a European syrup that quickly made its way to the United States and by the 1910s became a much more common syrup in mixed drinks. It’s around this time that cocktails like the Jack rose and ward 8 come about. Regional variations of some drinks still exist, though; these result from Americans having a long history of using raspberry or strawberry syrups. For example, the rose cocktail in American cocktail books often used raspberry syrup, and English cocktail books used grenadine. Another example is the clover club cocktail, wherein the United States is made with raspberry syrup, but in English books like the savoy, it’s made with grenadine.

Should You Buy Grenadine Or Make It?

Always make your own syrups unless it’s gum syrup, tonic syrup, or orgeat. Gum and orgeat you can make, but it is just a pain in the butt and tonic I would never make from scratch. Grenadine is super easy to make, cheap to make and results in a much better product. The recipe below is a standard grenadine recipe, but an ounce of pomegranate molasses adds richness to the syrup.

If you don’t have orange blossom water, that’s fine, but it adds a fantastic flavor and aroma to the syrup. Its importance shouldn’t be understated, but don’t let not having it keep you from making your own. Pomegranate juice and sugar are good, but it is traditional to add orange blossom water. Remember, grenadine originated from the Middle East as a culinary ingredient, and orange blossom water is also a common ingredient in Persian cooking. If you want to make a grenadine that tastes similar to what early French and English mixologists were using, add a little orange blossom water. If middle eastern markets are not common in your area, order them online. It’s worth it.

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Grenadine – Pomegranate Syrup

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

10

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

A simple easy grenadine recipe for cocktails.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups White Sugar

  • 1 cups Pomegranate Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Blossom Water

Directions

  • Combine sugar and pomegranate juice in a stove top pot and bring to a light simmer.
  • Stir till the sugar is fully dissolved and let the syrup simmer 5 minutes or till it has thickened a little. This give the syrup a more velvety texture and lets the flavors caramelize, giving the syrup a deeper more develop flavor.
  • Remove the grenadine from the heat. Let it cool and then stir in orange blossom water. Bottle and refrigerate.

Recipe Video


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Picon Punch – Make The Classic Early 1900s Recipe

Picon Punch
Picon Punch

The History Of The Picon Punch.

If you have not heard of this, it’s not surprising. It’s primarily made in the western side of the United States and is popular in parts of California and Nevada with large Basque immigrant populations. If you go to Basque areas in northern Spain, they will have no idea what this is. Most of the histories I have found on this credit its creation to the Noriega Hotel in Bakersfield, California. Although I think that was more just a story used by the hotel. The earliest printed reference of the Picon Punch is from the 1900 book “Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. It’s the first recipe listed in “miscellaneous and unclassified drinks” and is called an Amer Picon. The drink is labeled as already being a popular beverage in France, and that makes a lot more sense to me than it was invented in Bakersfield, California, during the end of the 19th century. The part I found most difficult to imagine was that a small hotel in Bakersfield was using grenadine before 1900.

The most popular red fruit syrup in the US before 1900 was raspberry syrup. William Boothby was the first American bartender to print recipes using grenadine. Grenadine first started being used in France and England around 1890; in his 1891 edition of the book, the Amer Picon cocktail does not use grenadine but orgeat. The change from orgeat to grenadine makes sense, too, with grenadine’s explosive popularity in France during that decade. Check out my grenadine article for its history and use in cocktails.

The hotel was founded in 1893, so that would have given them plenty of time to use Amer Picon before it stopped being imported to the US in 1920, but I don’t buy that it was invented there. The use of grenadine and references to its recipe many years before its origin story says it was created point to it being traditionally a French cocktail.

What Does The Picon Punch Taste Like?

This is a refreshing, lightly sweet, fruity, and herbal cocktail. It’s a lot of flavors that don’t sound like they should work together, but they do. It’s like an herbal pomegranate flavored soda, but it’s hard to describe and is one you need to try. While the garnish can be essential in cocktails (Some are purely decorative), it is necessary for this cocktail. The lemon oil on top took this cocktail from being just ok to being good. Also, the Aperitif you use makes a huge difference so get one you like to drink straight. I used Amaro Nonino, which turned out great, but Amaro Nonino is pretty pricey, so if you want another one, give that a try.

A substitute aperitif has to be used because Amer Picon is not imported into the US and has not been since prohibition. Also, Amer Picon isn’t made the same today as during the turn of the century. The alcohol content is different, and so is the flavor. It used to be around 40% abv, and today it’s 18%, and the taste has been updated for modern palates, so it’s an entirely different drink other than the name. You’ll never be able to recreate this drink in its original form completely, so find a bittersweet/orangey aperitif you like.

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Picon Punch (Classic Recipe)

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

15%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Picon Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Amer Picon

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water into the serving glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients together while also chilling them.
  • Lastly add the soda water.
  • Garnish with an expressed lemon peel.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Planter’s Punch #4 – Planter’s Inn Tasty 1984 Recipe

Planter's Punch Cocktail
Planter’s Punch Cocktail

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Planter’s Hotel 1984 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

The original Planter’s Hotel opened in 1809 and was mostly destroyed during the civil war. It did reopen but not as the elite southern hotel it once was. It eventually closed around the turn of the 20th century. The present-day Planter’s Hotel opened in 1984. Not to say the original hotel didn’t have a version of the planter’s punch, but there is no way they invented what we currently consider a planter’s punch. The issue here is that grenadine (A common ingredient in most planter’s punch recipes) didn’t begin to be used in cocktails until the turn of the 20th century. The earliest printed recipe with grenadine was in George Kappeler’s “Modern American Drinks,” published in 1895. Also, there is no known evidence of the original hotel having a house punch recipe. So this recipe is the present-day Planter’s Inn recipe from the 80s, But not to knock them too much, they have one of my favorite versions of this drink.

  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Orange Juice
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Pineapple Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 1 1/2 oz (45 mLs) Black Rum

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

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Planter’s Punch – Planters Inn 1984 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

147

kcal
ABV

16%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Planter’s Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 1.5 oz Black Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into glass filled with crused ice.

Notes


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Jack Rose – Beautiful Classic Early 1900s Cocktail

Jack Rose
Jack Rose

This drink dates back to the early 1900s, and it is one of those drinks that everyone and their mother claimed they invented. The name for it most likely came from the fact that it was pink and made with apple brandy, the most common brand of apple brandy in the United States being Laird’s AppleJack.

Others, however say it was named after a gangster from that period. Think of this as a slightly sweeter and pink version of a Sidecar.

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Jack Rose

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

181

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Jack Rose.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Apple Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


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Tequila Sunrise – The Classic 1970s Trident Version

Tequila Sunrise Cocktail
Tequila Sunrise Cocktail

The History Of The Tequila Sunrise.

The Original tequila sunrise is commonly believed to be invented by Gene Sulit in the 1930s at the Baltimore Hotel in Pheonix, Arizona. The Original Baltimore Hotel recipe is 2/3 oz lime juice, 2/3 oz creme de Cassis, 1.5 oz silver tequila in a glass with ice and topped off with soda water.

The more common present-day recipe was invented in the early 1970s by Bob Lozoff while working at the Trident restaurant in Sausalito, California. In an ad for Jose Cuervo, bob stated the tequila sunrise was too complicated for them to make, so they made their own variation of tequila, orange juice, and grenadine. They chose to call this new drink the tequila sunrise instead. The Rolling Stones hosted a private party at the Trident and apparently fell in love with the drink. Interest in this version of the tequila sunrise grew out of the Rolling Stones’ popularity, and they’re requesting for a tequila sunrise made this specific way.

What Does The Tequila Sunrise Taste Like?

The Bob Lozoff version of the tequila sunrise taste like a slightly sweeter, fruitier screwdriver. It’s an improvement on the standard screwdriver, a pretty one-dimensional drink. The tequila sunrise makes for a good brunch cocktail. I won’t say it’s a great drink, but it’s not bad. Aesthetically it is better than it tastes.

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Tequila Sunrise

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

405

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the 1970s Trident restaurant version of the Tequila Sunrise.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 6 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Grenadine

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass except the grenadine.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into serving glass and gently pour in the grenadine so it settles on the bottom.

Notes


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Scofflaw – Original 1934 Harry’s New York Bar Recipe

Scofflaw Cocktail
Scofflaw Cocktail

In 1920s Paris, France, the Scofflaw was invented by a man known as Jock at Harry’s New York Bar. During prohibition, a few European and South American bars modeled themselves after the old American bars and turned up cool drinks like this.

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Scofflaw

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

244

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Scofflaw.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Grenadine

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


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Rose – Make This Beautiful Grenadine Rose Cocktail

Rose Cocktail (English Version)
Rose Cocktail (English Version)

The oldest reference to the Rose cocktail I can find is Robert Vermeire’s 1922 English cocktail book Cocktails and How to Mix Them. He credits its invention to Sidney Knight in London at the Alhambra theatre (I have no idea who Sidney Knight is, nor could I find anything about him).

What sets the English version of this cocktail apart from the French (currant) and American (raspberry) grenadine is used as the red fruit sweetener.

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Rose (Grenadine Version)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

156

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Rose cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Kirschwasser

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


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