Picon Punch Strong- Improved Classic Picon Punch

History Of The Picon Punch

If you have not heard of this it’s not surprising. It’s mostly made in the western side of the United States and is popular in parts of California and Nevada with large Basque immigrant populations. If you go to Basque areas in northern Spain they will have no idea what this is. Most of the histories I have found on this credit its creation to the Noriega Hotel in Bakersfield California. Although I think that was more just a cool story used by the hotel and I don’t think that’s the case. The earliest printed reference I can find of the Picon Punch is from the 1900 book “Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. Its the first recipe listed in “miscellaneous and unclassified drinks” and is simply called an Amer Picon. The drink is labeled as already being a popular beverage in France, and that makes a lot more sense to me than it being invented in Bakersfield California during the end of the 19th century. The part I personally find most difficult to imagine was that a small hotel in Bakersfield was using grenadine before 1900.

The most popular red fruit syrup in the US prior to 1900 was raspberry syrup. William Boothby was actually the first American bartender to print recipes using grenadine. Grenadine first started being used in France and England around 1890, and in fact in his 1891 edition of the book, the Amer Picon cocktail does not use grenadine but orgeat instead. The change from orgeat to grenadine makes sense too with grenadines explosive popularity in France during that decade. Check out my grenadine article for its history and use in cocktails.

The hotel was founded in 1893 so that would have given them plenty of time to use Amer Picon before it stopped being imported to the US in 1920, but I don’t buy that it was invented there. The use of grenadine, and references to its recipe many years before its origin story says it was invented point to it being traditionally a French cocktail.

This is not the classic Picon Punch but a strong variation served without ice in a cocktail glass. Both the classic and this version are very good but they have different intents. This strong version transforms the refreshing Picon Punch into a classic style cocktail.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Picon Punch Strong- Improved Classic Picon Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Picon Punch Strong.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Amer Picon

  • 2/3 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients. Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

    u003cliu003eTools Used: u003ca data-eafl-id=u002213289u0022 data-eafl-text=u0022Mixing Glassu0022 href=u0022https://amzn.to/3Dv2Kgfu0022 class=u0022eafl-linku0022u003eMixing Glassu003c/au003e, u003ca data-eafl-id=u002213188u0022 data-eafl-text=u0022Jiggeru0022 href=u0022https://amzn.to/3sAaUhuu0022 class=u0022eafl-linku0022u003eJiggeru003c/au003e, u003ca href=u0022https://amzn.to/3cUnHWcu0022 data-eafl-id=u002213481u0022 data-eafl-text=u0022Straineru0022 class=u0022eafl-linku0022u003eStraineru003c/au003eu003c/liu003eu003cliu003eServing Glass: u003ca data-eafl-id=u002213191u0022 data-eafl-text=u0022Coupe Glassu0022 href=u0022https://amzn.to/3wVnBXNu0022 class=u0022eafl-linku0022u003eCoupe Glassu003c/au003eu003c/liu003e

Fog Cutter – Classic Victor Bergeron Tiki Cocktail Recipe

Fog Cutter Taste & History

This is defiantly more on the tart side of tiki drinks and is closer in taste to a sour than most juice filled tiki cocktails. Think of this as kind of a nutty tiki version of a rum sour. Its an wonderful cocktail that is more to the taste of someone who like sours than someone who likes Dark & Stormies or mules.

Nothing too interesting on the history of this cocktail. It was invented by Victor Bergeron for Trader Vic’s and was one of his most popular cocktails second to the Mai Tai. Trader Vic’s Bartending Guide says that after 2 of these you won’t even see straight anymore, but I have had 2 or 3 of them and I was alright. There are countless variations on this guy (that’s true for almost all tiki drinks), but this here is the tried and true recipe from Trader Vic’s book itself.

Floating Sherry On Top

The last ingredient in this cocktail is to do a sherry float on top. Here is the thing though, sherry is very dense and thus can not float. Floating alcohols on top of each other is based on weight. Sugar is heavier than water, water is heavier than alcohol, and the heaviest ingredient will always sit at the bottom. The sherry is way more sugary than the drink therefore it will want to drop to the bottom. This works out to have a cool effect and makes it look as if the sherry is cutting through the drink. If you want a cool dark float that will sit at the top try using 151, as it is has less sugar than the rest of the drink and is much more alcoholic, so it will stay on top.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Fog Cutter – Classic Victor Bergeron Tiki Cocktail Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

344

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Fog Cutter.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 2 oz White Rum

  • 1 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Sherry

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except the sherry into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all
  • Top with a float of sherry.

Notes

Scorpion Cocktail – Trader Vic’s 1972 Single Serve Scorpion Recipe

Scorpion Cocktail History

The original scorpion was not a bowl or an individual cocktail but a punch from Victor Bergeron’s First book from 1947, and was a punch made for 12. The original scorpion recipe was 1.5 bottles of rum, 2 oz gin, 2 oz brandy, 1 pint of lemon juice, 1/2 a pint of orange juice, 1/2 a pint worth of orgeat, 1/2 a bottle or white wine and 2 sprigs of mint. Those are some odd proportions if you ask me, like Trader vic added the gin and mint as a joke. That original scorpion punch is also in the 1972 edition, but the updated edition included his more popular versions of the scorpion.

Trader vic heavily modified the recipe over the years and in his 1972 edition added the scorpion bowl and a single scorpion cocktail. The recipe here is the single serve version and in my opinion the best version of the drink. But I will say those flaming scorpion bowls are a ton of fun. Oddly enough the scorpion bowl which is made to serve 3 is not just 3x the ingredients of the single serve one. The ingredients are the same but the volumes are different.

Scorpion Taste

The scorpion was Trader Vic’s third most popular cocktail and while I think this is the best version of the drink it’s not a top tier tiki cocktail in my book. It’s just kinda juice and booze. Again that is a personal opinion and taste is subjective. Its good but not outstanding. When I think tiki I envision juice, booze and spice, but this cocktail lacks spice. The Orgeat adds a nice nuttiness to the drink but the white rum and orange juice and lemon juice are the most prominent flavors. And if its going to be heavy on the juice then let it be exotic juices like pomegranate, passion fruit, pineapple, papaya, etc, not just orange and lemon. This is a tiki drink I would have loved when I first started drinking tiki drinks, but a decade and half in this comes off bland to me.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Scorpion Cocktail – Original Trader Vic’s Tiki Cocktail Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

296

kcal
ABV

17%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Scorpion.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2 oz Orange Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 1 oz Brandy

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients into a blender with a single scoop of ice cubes.
  • Blend on low for 10 seconds or till the ice is mostly pulverized.
  • Now blend on high for 5-10 seconds to completely crush the ice and turn the drink into a slushy texture.
  • Pour into serving glass.

Notes

English Milk Punch – 1763 Benjamin Franklin Recipe

History Of Clarified Milk Punch

The common origin story to this cocktail is provided in David Wondrich’s book “Punch” is the Clarified Milk Punch was invented by Mary Rockett. This cocktail seems to have been invented as a way of preserving milk punch by curdling and removing the parts that go bad and would turn the drink. The alcohol and milk fats protect the drink with epic stories of it lasting far longer than one would expect it to. Prior to refrigeration that was hard to do. The recipe I have provided here is the classic Benjamin Franklin English milk punch from 1763.

The Clarified or English milk punch starts to fade in the middle of the 1800s, and by the 1900s there isn’t a single book that mentions it. The invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid 1800s meant people could now get their drinks cold even in the middle of summer. Hot cocktails, room temperature cocktails, and preserved cocktails like this, fall out of favor to chilled drinks. Jerry Thomas give one of the last printed recipes for it and his is very similar to Benjamin Franklin’s recipe.

What Does English Milk Punch Taste Like

This taste absolutely nothing like what you would expect and it should not taste as good as it does. English milk punch is refreshing, full body and taste like a fancy sparkling lemonade but without the bubbles. You would never guess this was the byproduct of cheese. I’m usually pretty good at tasting something and guessing what is in it, or reading a list of ingredients and knowing what the final product will taste like, not all the time but enough, but I was completely and totally wrong when guessing what English milk punch would taste like. This is a fantastic drink that blew me away, and one I will make many more times.

Now just for fun I also tried the leftover cheese strained out of the milk punch and that taste EXACTLY like what you would expect. It was awful. A sweet and sour, booze cheese and it was so gross. If you make this, which you should, try both the cheese and the punch and you will be amazed they both came from the same mixture.

How Do You Make Clear Milk

By making cheese of course. Milk is made mostly of 4 things, water, protein (cheese), fat , and lactose (sugar) and by denaturing/cooking the protein you are able to isolate it out. Cooking can be done 2 ways, with heat, or acid. Typically when making cheese you keep the protein part and throw out the whey, but this cocktail reverses that and instead you save is the whey (water, fat, sugar) part. By removing the cloudy white protein, what is left is the clear pale yellow liquid.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

English Milk Punch – 1763 Benjamin Franklin Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

15

servings
Calories

180

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

2

hours 

Learn how to make English Milk Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 Cup Simple Syrup

  • 2 Cups Water

  • 1/2 Teaspoon Nutmeg

  • 3 Cups Brandy

  • 1.5 Cups Milk

Directions

  • Using a knife cut the zest of 5 lemons and juice the lemons to the required volume. Set juice aside. add the shaved zest to the brandy and let it sit for 24 hours. After 24 hours remove and discard the lemon zest.
  • Add the sugar to the brandy and stir till dissolved. Now set brandy aside.
  • In a large pot combine water, nutmeg, and milk and bring to 100f/37c.
  • Once milk has warmed turn off heat and add the lemon juice and brandy. Stir the mixture for 30 seconds then let it sit for 2 hours undisturbed.
  • Line a mesh strainer with a large paper coffee filter and strain out cheese, letting the clear whey run into a large pot. Bottle, refrigerate and serve cold.

Tom & Jerry | Improved 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Tom & Jerry Batter

Tom and Jerry batter is basically an egg yolk and Christmas spice flavored mousse. It’s actually pretty good on its own and doesn’t need to be mixed into a drink. You can make it yourself or Tom and Jerry batter can be bought in stores during the holiday season in the upper midwest, where the drink is still pretty popular. I use to publish the original recipe on this site but I now use an updated one that I feel makes for a considerably better drink while still being very similar flavor wise to the original. Most modern recipe include butter, heavy cream, and as a result are much denser and almost eggnog like. Mine does not. If the recipe is true to the classic and lacks a heavy fat ingredient then the problem they are stuck with is using just warm water or milk as meringue can not be heated so violently and rapidly. These versions taste fine but I personally found this one that uses actually hot water to taste the best. The aroma is better, it sips better, and just has a more cozy feel to it. At its core, the issue Tom and Jerry Batter faces is the same issue all egg based desserts face when heated. The risk of curdling.

Most desserts try to solve this problem by cooking in a water bath so the egg doesn’t get too hot and the original 1862 recipe could only use warm water and not hot or else it too would curdle too. Most modern recipes try to fix this by adding butter or heavy cream since a cooked protein will bond to fat before bonding to another protein, or they just stick with using kinda warm water or milk. While this keeps the drink from curdling it either completely changes the flavor and texture or makes for a weak old tasting drink. The solution I am using is an old bakers technique to add small amount of thickened corn starch similar to American style custard. American custards, cream pies, cream fillings, etc are cooked at rapid high heats like any other dessert and do not curdle. This solution fixes the issue of curdling and lets the drink get heated to a proper hot drinks temperature, while maintaining the drinks original flavor and texture.

Improved Tom & Jerry Batter Recipe

I tried to change as little about the original recipe and its ratios as possible. The only changes I made were adding cornstarch as a stabilizer, and reducing the sugar to a more balanced amount. If you do not add cornstarch then DO NOT use hot water. Only use warmed water or milk as the rapid heat will curdle the egg and make the drink lumpy.

  • 6 Eggs
  • 1.5 cups (360 g) of sugar
  • 1 tbs (15 g) Cornstarch
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) gold rum
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground allspice
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground cinnamon
  1. Combine cornstarch and an ounce of hot water, stir till the cornstarch is dissolved and the mixture is thick, then set aside.
  2. Separate the egg whites and yolks into two bowls.
  3. Add the sugar to the egg whites and using an electric mixer (you would be crazy to do this by hand) beat the eggs into a medium peak meringue.
  4. Once you are done beating, still using the electric mixer, slowly add the thickened wet corn starch. The cornstarch can only be added after you are done beating the meringue. The cornstarch prevents the meringue from cooking when you add hot water and turning into poached eggs.
  5. In the second bowl with the egg yolks add the rum, ground cloves, cinnamon, and allspice. Using the electric mixer again beat the yolks till they become lighter in color and runny.
  6. Add the egg yolk mixture to the meringue and fold to combine.

If you are curious check out and read the full The Improved 1860s Style Tom & Jerry Batter article and learn about the original recipe from the 1862 Bartenders Guide.

Eggnog vs. Tom & Jerry

The Tom and Jerry is often compared to a lighter eggnog but it all depends on which recipe of a Tom and Jerry you are comparing to which recipe of eggnog. If you are comparing a store bought Tom and Jerry to store bough eggnog, then yes, they do taste similar. Most eggnogs today are made with cooked eggs and heavy cream and the result is a thick boozy custard. Its a very heavy drink and a Tom and Jerry with heated milk is much lighter with a similar in flavor.

For the sake of comparing apples to apples, if you compare a mid 1800s eggnog recipe to this classic style Tom and Jerry recipe then they are completely different. This classic style Tom and Jerry is more cappuccino like than egg nog. The top has a nice foam to it similar to a cappuccino but the drink itself is light. An 1800s style, eggnog taste more like a rich milk punch than todays custard like ones. The modern version of both drinks are similar, with the Tom and Jerry being a warm thinner version of eggnog, but the older version of both drinks are very different.

History Of The Tom & Jerry

Jerry Thomas most likely invented the Tom & Jerry since there is no reference to it till Jerry Thomas published his recipe. The cocktail is often credited to being invented by him anyway. The story goes that he named the drink after his two pet mice, Thomas and Jerry, which he named after himself. Even Savoy credits him with inventing it and the Savoy is pretty on point.

While the Tom & Jerry seems to fade a bit in the 1930s its still in the larger cocktail books up through the 1970s (I try to limit this project to only published literature from 1970 and earlier). Victor Bergeron in his 1972 book even gives a single serve recipe if one needs to be made on the spot. The Tom & Jerry is a very preparation and labor intensive drink so I feel this is relegated to be more of a home holiday party cocktail and I have never once seen this at a bar ever.

When I first heard of this cocktail I wondered if the iconic MGM cat and mouse cartoon Tom and Jerry were named after it. Unfortunately no one knows if the cartoon famous Cat and Mouse duo Tom and Jerry were named after the drink, but it would be quite the coincidence. Joseph Barbara, of Hanna Barbara, wrote in his autobiography “My Life in Toons” how they came up with the names Tom and Jerry. “We left the choice of names to chance. We invited studio personnel to write down pairs of names on pieces of paper and toss them into a hat. We shook the hat and drew Tom and Jerry, which had been submitted by an animator named John Carr. He won fifty dollars.” Maybe John Carr knew the drink from a holiday party, who knows, they are all long gone now.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Tom & Jerry – Original 1862 jerry Thomas Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Tom & Jerry Cocktail.

Ingredients

Directions

  • Drop batter into a ceramic or heat resistant mug. Batter recipe is posted above or click here to read it.
  • Add warm water and stir till the batter is completely incorporated into the water.
  • Lastly add the spirit and give a couple last stirs to finish mixing the drink.
  • Garnish with a dusting of nutmeg.

Notes

Brandy Rickey – A Sweet Variation of the Gin Rickey

The History Of The Rickey

Invented in the Late 19th century, by D.C. lobbyist Joe Rickey (At least that’s who is credited with having invented it), the rickey is a refreshing and slightly tart cocktail. This recipe is a brandy variation of the original whiskey based rickey. More than just a recipe the rickey became an archetype for many popular cocktails, even if you don’t realize they are structurally a rickey. The rickey cocktail structure is simple: 1/2 ounce (15 mls) citrus, 2 oz (60 mls) base spirit, and 5 oz (150 mls) carbonated beverage. For example the rum and coke with a lime is a rickey, Dark ‘N’ Stormy, gin and tonic; these are all based on rickey structures.

What Does a Brandy Rickey Taste Like

The Brandy Rickey has a refreshing and slightly tart taste with the taste of brandy clearly coming through. A perfect sipper for a warm day.

THE MOST IMPORTANT INGREDIENT

The most important ingredient in a rickey, I feel, is actually the soda water and how the cocktail is prepared. Of course the spirit and citrus are the flavors you taste but the soda water is what provides all the texture. If you prepare it so it stays as bubbly as possible, you will end up with an outstanding cocktail but if you don’t cool the ingredients or glass properly and stir it too violently you will end up with a flat lame cocktail, similar to drinking a flat soda. Sure the flavor will be there but it will be flat. So here is what you do. The 2 things you have control over are 1). the temperature and 2). how violently you add the soda water. First add the spirit and citrus to a glass filled with ice. Stir them together so that they get cold and the inside of the glass chills too. Even better you could chill the glass in the freezer first but that requires forethought. Stirring with ice works well enough on the spot. Next when you add the soda water do it gently and only give the drink a couple turns to mix the soda water with the spirit and citrus. Adding and stirring the soda water like this helps maintain as much carbonation as possible and the bubblier it is, the more refreshing it will be.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Brandy Rickey – A Sweet Variation of the Gin Rickey

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

135

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Brandy Rickey.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2 oz Brandy

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Fill your serving glass with ice. Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the glass
  • Stir and combine the ingredients and at the same time chilling the glass. Top off with more ice if you need to.
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation and give a couple gentle stirs to mix.

Notes

Jean Collins – A Brandy Variation of a John Collins

John Collins vs. Tom Collins And The History Of All The Different Collins

While probably not invented by Harry Johnson, his 1882 Bartenders Manual is the oldest printed book I could find to mention the Collins cocktail. There are many sources that say it was invented in 1814 at Limmer’s Old House in London but who really knows. There is no documentation of this and all the sources that state this seem to circularly reference each other. The oldest concrete evidence of this cocktail I can find is the Harry Johnson one. It seems both the John Collins and Tom Collins are invented around the same time and the Bartenders Manual gives a pretty definitive recipe for both the John and Tom Collins. His John Collins recipe calls for genever (dry gin doesn’t really start to get mixed into cocktails till the end of the 1800s/early 1900s) and his recipe for the Tom Collins calls for Old Tom gin. Harry Johnson’s collins recipes and names are clearly defined, but unlike Harry Johnson, Jerry Thomas’s 1887 Bartenders Guide does not follow his recipes. The Bartender’s Guide doesn’t even mention the John Collins but instead uses the name Tom Collins for every variation of the collins. It has 3 different recipes for the Tom Collins. A Tom Collins whiskey, a Tom Collins brandy, and a Tom Collins genever. It doesn’t mention the Tom Collins with Old Tom gin at all and call the one made with genever a Tom Collins too.

To Further complicate this in 1885 a British cocktail book called “The New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef” by Bacchus and Cordon Bleu has a recipe for what they call a Fred Collins. Their Fred Collins Recipe is basically a Whiskey Collins with orange liqueur instead of simple syrup. Their Collins section states “I should be glad if our caterers would agree what it is to be perpetually named. One Barkeeper calls it a John Collins – another Tom Collins. There are also Harry and Fred, all members of the same family.” They then go on to say they prefer the Fred Collins name, Thus lends credence to Jerry Thomas’s version of the Collins in that the name is more a style than a specific drink. Hell there was a Harry Collins we have never seen. The Savoy Cocktail Book does the same thing and has both a Dry Gin and Whiskey Tom Collins. Although The Savoy does say that a Tom Collins made with genever is instead called a John Collins.

While The Harry Johnson uses the names as specific cocktails, the Bartenders guide and others seemed to use the collins as a cocktail structure more than a specific recipe. Similar to the Rickey, Daisy, or Fizz, the collins is used to describe a structure of 2 parts base spirit, 1 part citrus, 1 part sweetener, and 4 or 5 parts carbonated beverage. Harry Johnson influence has been permanent and the collins is ultimately both. It is both a specific cocktail like Harry Johnson pushed and a cocktail archetype like others believed. looking at its influence as an archetype there are many popular cocktails which are structurally a collins that you would not think of as a Collins. The Adios Motherfucker, Mojito, French 75, Paloma, etc, are all just fun variation on the Collins form.

How Does the Jean Collins Taste

The Jean Collins is a brandy variation of the John Collins and really really good. The mellow aged sweetness of the brandy perfectly blends with the orange liqueur and lemon juice into a bubbly refreshing cocktail. Imagine this as a lengthened and more refreshing Side Car.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Jean Collins – A Fun Variation of a John Collins

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

243

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Jean Collins.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Brandy

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker except the soda water. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and lastly gently add the soda water.

Notes

Brandy Crusta – Classic 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

History Of The Brandy Crusta

First printed in the 1862 Bartenders guide by Jerry Thomas, the Brandy Crusta is old as it is delicious. The Crusta is considered one of the oldest fancy sours and is named for decorative sugar crusted rim. It was invented in the 1850s by Joseph Santini in New Orleans Louisiana, USA and was made to try and improve the taste of the standard sour cocktail. You can spot a crusta by its oversized decorative lemon peel that imparts that this is a special elevated sour cocktail.

How Does It Taste

These are fantastic cocktails that taste light and delicate while not being overly sour or overly sweet. While the standard sour is more flavorful and benefits from sharper more intense spirits this one is different a nicer top shelf spirit actually works better. This is because you are not overwhelming the base spirit with a whole ounce of sweetener and citrus and the more subtle finer qualities of a better base spirit can still come through. Make this with the perspective that you are not making a strong flavorful cocktail but rather adding subtle flavor and complexity to an already delicious spirit.

The most Important Ingredient

There isn’t any one important ingredient in this cocktail but instead all the ingredients coming together in the proper balance. but if I tried to narrow it down I would say the brandy, orange liqueur and gum syrup are the most important parts of this cocktail to get right. You want to use a good base spirit for this cocktail as none of the other ingredients are made to mask the flavor of a lower quality spirit. So what ever the quality of the base spirit you use will make a meaningful difference in the final product. The orange liqueur matters too because cheap orange liqueurs are typically not very good. I love buying on value, but I’ve never found a cheaper orange liqueur that also tasted good and with how this drink is structured you will notice a cheap orange liqueur. Lastly the gum syrup. You can use a standard simple syrup if you prefer and what that will change is the texture of the cocktail. Gum Syrup has gum arabic in it and gives the cocktail a velvety texture similar to what egg whites provide. A smooth, meringue-y, velvet, dessert like texture. Standard simple syrup will not add this texture and make for a thinner liquid texture cocktail, but you may prefer that. If you like your sours without egg whites then opt for using standard simple syrup but if you like sours with egg whites then buy a bottle of gum syrup and give it a go.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Brandy Crusta – Classic 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

193

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Brandy Crusta.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Gum Syrup

  • 1 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards. Garnish with a whole lemon peel that circles the glass.

Notes

Vieux Carre | Original 1937 Walter Bergeron – New Orleans Recipe

Any cocktail with Peychaud’s Bitters is almost always from New Orleans. The name Le Vieux Carre translates to “The Old Square”, referring to the New Orleans French Quarter. The drink was invented in 1937 by Walter Bergeron who was the head bartender at the Monte Leone Hotel In New Orleans.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the free and easy to use Vintage American Cocktail app.

Vieux Carre | Original 1937 Walter Bergeron – New Orleans Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

144

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Vieux Carre.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Peychauds Bitters

  • 1 tsp Benedictine

  • 2/3 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2/3 oz Brandy

  • 2/3 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Eggnog | Easy Traditional 1862 Recipe

Eggnog Variations

There are countless eggnog recipes and they all range from thick custard like dairy drinks to non-alcoholic almond milk drinks, and from really good store bought to really bad store bought. During the holiday season a typical grocery store may sell well over a dozen different eggnogs. although, where you can really have fun with eggnog is when its homemade. Common homemade variations of eggnog are:

  1. Traditional no cook eggnog. Like this recipe most of your traditional eggnogs are not cooked but either shaken or beaten and drank right there on the spot or stored in the fridge for several days to develop more flavor.
  2. Modern cooked eggnog. Eggnogs started to get cooked due to the worry of food poisonings from consuming raw eggs. These tend to be very thick and custard like and the majority of most recipes today.
  3. Dairy free eggnog. Typically made for a lactose intolerance, these will replace the dairy with either coconut milk, almond milk, soy milk, oat milk or some other kind of alternative milk. They also usually don’t have eggs and most are also vegan.
  4. Egg free eggnog. Typically made for allergies, dietary or just because some folks are grossed out by drinking eggs. Egg free eggnogs just exclude the eggs altogether and use heavy cream to provide a thicker texture.
  5. Vegan eggnog. Made for dietary and lifestyle choices, most of your dairy free egg nogs are also vegan.
  6. Alcohol free eggnog. Almost all store bough eggnogs are alcohol free, unless they are sold at liquor stores. Typically bought for their convenience, the option of adding alcohol or not, and so children can join in too.

I love eggnog and have drank a ton of the every kind listed above. That being said this 1862 Jerry Thomas recipe is the best eggnog I have ever had. THE BEST. This is not a super sweet and thick recipe, it taste like a slightly thicker milk punch. This recipe is ripped right from the 1862 Bartender’s guide. The only change I made is the addition of vanilla extract, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The original recipe did not have those ingredients, but I added them because they do make the drink taste better and more inline with what someone expects eggnog to taste like. To me what makes this recipe outstanding is it taste exactly like you would expect eggnog to taste but the texture is thinner, and more like a normal cocktail. It may sound gross to just crack an egg into your shaker, shake it up and drink it, but you will be blown away once you try this eggnog. Keep in mind, these are the original recipes that made eggnog famous to begin with.

To Cook Or Not To Cook Eggnog

Most eggnogs are cooked at low heat for a bit, refrigerated for a few days, and taste like custard or melted ice cream. This is done to ensure that all the germs are killed that could potentially cause food poisoning and because most people are super grossed out at the idea of drinking a raw egg. Cooking also adds quite a bit of time to making eggnog, and it can be difficult to prevent clumping from the egg whites cooking. Hence why most just buy it these days. Although if you add thickened cornstarch to the eggs before cooking it prevents the egg whites from forming large cooked groups. Most recipes say the cornstarch is to add thickness but its really to prevent the proteins from forming large bonds and making the eggnog chunky.

This is not that kind of recipe. This one is fast and easy to make. No cooking, just a bunch of shaking. Most of the really old recipes I found are not the cooked custard kinds but recipes like this one. If you want you can let this drink sit in the fridge for a few days to develop more flavor or just drink it right away.

As a word of warning use pasteurized eggs if you can. Pasteurized eggs are still raw like a normal egg but with all the germs killed off. Pasteurized eggs don’t make big foamy egg white heads like non-pasteurized eggs do but you can be sure they won’t get you sick. The FDA guesstimates that 1 in every 40,000 eggs has salmonella. Which is super rare. Pasteurized eggs are kinda hard to find so you can pasteurizing them yourself or just roll the dice. If you have one of those fancy sous vide devices it’s really easy to do. As someone who has had Salmonella poisoning before, without going into detail, I will say it is one of the most painful things I have ever experienced. Again 1 in every 40,000. So super rare, and if you get Salmonella you’re much more likely to get it the same way I did. Eating dirty food prepared by someone who didn’t wash their hands. I’ve eaten countless raw eggs and have never gotten sick from eggs once.

History Of Eggnog

There is no definitive answer to where eggnog came from. Many guess it is a descendant of a medieval drink called posset, which is a milk and beer drink that would sometimes have an egg added for extra creamy-ness and flavor. The Oxford English Dictionary canonized the word nog in the late 1600s to mean a strong ale. It was probably used by the general population much earlier than that but that’s when it was officially recorded. The first use of the word Eggnog started popping up in the United States in the late 1700s. England had a similar drink but it was called an Egg Flip. Over time it became linked to Christmas and is not made much outside of the winter holiday season.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Eggnog | Easy Traditional 1862 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

584

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Eggnog.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Vanilla Extract

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 6 oz Half & Half

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Simply combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and garnish with ground nutmeg.

Notes