Eggnog – Make This Amazing And Simple Traditional 1862 Recipe

Egg Nog Cocktail
Egg Nog Cocktail

Some Variations On Eggnog.

There are countless eggnog recipes, and they all range from thick custard-like dairy drinks to non-alcoholic almond milk drinks and from really good store-bought to bad store-bought. A typical grocery store may sell well over a dozen different eggnogs during the holiday season. Although, you can have fun with eggnog when it’s homemade. Common homemade variations of eggnog are:

  1. Traditional no-cook eggnog. Like this recipe, most of your traditional eggnogs are not cooked but either shaken or beaten and drank right there or stored in the fridge for several days to develop more flavor.
  2. Modern cooked eggnog. Eggnogs started to get cooked due to the worry of food poisoning from consuming raw eggs. These tend to be very thick and custard-like and are the majority of most recipes today.
  3. Dairy-free eggnog. Typically made for lactose intolerance, these will replace the dairy with either coconut milk, almond milk, soy milk, oat milk, or other alternative milk. They also usually don’t have eggs, and most are also vegan.
  4. Egg-free eggnog. They are typically made for allergies, dietary, or just because some folks are grossed out by drinking eggs. Egg-free eggnogs exclude the eggs altogether and use heavy cream to provide a thicker texture.
  5. Vegan eggnog. Made for dietary and lifestyle choices, most of your dairy-free egg nogs are also vegan.
  6. Alcohol-free eggnog. Almost all store-bought eggnogs are alcohol-free unless bought at a liquor store. Typically purchased for their convenience, the option of adding alcohol or not, children can join in.

I love eggnog and have drank a ton of everything listed above. That being said, this 1862 Jerry Thomas recipe is the best eggnog I have ever had. THE BEST. This is not a sweet and thick recipe; it tastes like a slightly thicker milk punch. This recipe is ripped right from the 1862 Bartender’s guide. The only change I made was the addition of vanilla extract, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The original recipe did not have those ingredients, but I added them because they make the drink taste better and more in line with what someone expects eggnog to taste. This recipe is outstanding because it tastes exactly like you would expect eggnog to taste, but the texture is thinner and more like a standard cocktail. It may sound gross to crack an egg into your shaker, shake it up and drink it, but you will be blown away once you try this eggnog. Keep in mind that these are the original recipes that made eggnog famous.

Is Eggnog Cooked Or Not?

Most eggnogs are cooked at low heat, refrigerated for a few days, and taste like custard or melted ice cream. This is done to ensure that all the germs are killed that could potentially cause food poisoning and because most people are super grossed out at the idea of drinking a raw egg. Cooking also adds quite a bit of time to making eggnog, and it can be challenging to prevent clumping from the egg whites cooking hence why most buy it these days. Although if you add thickened cornstarch to the eggs before cooking prevents the egg whites from forming large cooked groups. Most recipes say the cornstarch adds thickness, but it prevents the proteins from forming large bonds and making the eggnog chunky.

This is not that kind of recipe. This one is fast and easy to make. No cooking, just a bunch of shaking. Most of the ancient recipes I found are not the cooked custard kinds but recipes like this one. You can let this drink sit in the fridge for a few days to develop more flavor or drink it right away.

As a word of warning, use pasteurized eggs if you can. Pasteurized eggs are still raw like a regular egg but with all the germs killed off. Pasteurized eggs don’t make big foamy egg white heads like non-pasteurized eggs do, but you can be sure they won’t get you sick. The FDA guesstimates that 1 in every 40,000 eggs has salmonella, which is super rare. Pasteurized eggs are hard to find, so you can pasteurize them yourself or roll the dice. If you have one of those fancy sous vide devices. As someone who has had Salmonella poisoning before, without going into detail, I will say it is one of the most painful things I have ever experienced. Again 1 in every 40,000. So rare, and if you get Salmonella, you’re much more likely to get it the same way I did by eating contaminated food prepared by someone who didn’t wash their hands. I’ve eaten countless raw eggs and have never gotten sick from eggs once.

The History Of Eggnog.

There is no definitive answer to where eggnog came from. Many guess it is a descendant of a medieval drink called posset, a milk and beer drink that would sometimes have an egg added for extra creaminess and flavor. The Oxford English Dictionary canonized the word nog in the late 1600s to mean a strong ale. It was probably used by the general population much earlier than that, but that’s when it was officially recorded. The first use of the word Eggnog started popping up in the United States in the late 1700s. England had a similar drink, but it was called an Egg Flip. Over time it became linked to Christmas and is not made much outside of the winter holiday season.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Eggnog

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

584

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Eggnog.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Vanilla Extract

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 6 oz Half u0026 Half

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Simply combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and garnish with ground nutmeg.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Star Cocktail – Make This Delicious 1895 Brandy Cocktail

star
star

First appearing in 1895, this drink initially used gum syrup to sweeten it, but simple syrup works. This is a delicious drink but doesn’t take my word for it, make it yourself.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Star Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

182

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Star Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Sazerac – Make This Quintessential New Orleans Cocktail

Sazerac
Sazerac

This is the quintessential New Orleans cocktail. You can substitute the brandy for Whiskey and the absinthe for anise liqueur, and this drink will still be good. Outside of New Orleans, Whiskey was a popular substitute for brandy.

Once absinthe became illegal in the U.S. in 1912, bartenders began substituting it for anise liqueur. On the other hand, Peychaud’s bitters are what make this drink and cannot be replaced. Invented in the mid-1800s by a guy named Aaron Bird, this drink was unknown outside of New Orleans until the early 1900s.

The Sazerac is essentially the French-influenced New Orleans variation of the Old Fashioned. Aaron named the drink after the brand of brandy/cognac (Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils) being imported by a local merchant that he first used to construct this drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Sazerac

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

226

kcal
ABV

34%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Sazerac.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Absinthe

  • 1 tsp Peychauds Bitters

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Brandy Daisy – Make The Original 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Brandy Daisy Cocktail
Brandy Daisy Cocktail

The History Of The Daisy Style Cocktail.

The daisy was another early cocktail style emerging around the same time as the crusta and many other early standard sour cocktails. The Daisy is essentially a crusta with an ounce of soda water to cut the intensity and make the cocktail more refreshing. First appearing in the 1862 edition of the bartender’s guide by Jerry Thomas, The daisy is a beautiful cocktail if you find the standard sour is a bit too strong.

What Does The Brandy Daisy Taste Like?

The Brandy Daisy is a beautiful little cocktail that adds a bit of refreshing soda water to a delicious sour cocktail. The small amount of Orange Liqueur adds a pleasant orange flavor on top of the citrus. The primary flavor is still brandy, and the subtle flavors of the brandy shine through in this cocktail.

A Nice Brandy Taste Better In This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is the brandy you use. I don’t often use fine sipping spirits for cocktails. Still, the proportion of the other ingredients is so small that a nicer, more mellow brandy makes for a better-balanced drink where you can still appreciate the subtleties of a nicer brandy. The brandy daisy is a beautiful drink, but it’s not for everyone. If you love brandy and find the sidecar cocktail too sweet, this is the cocktail for you.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Brandy Daisy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Brandy Daisy.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 3 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 tsp Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Brandy Daisy

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Mint Julep – Make The Amazing Original 1862 Recipe

Mint Julep
Mint Julep

The History of Julep Cocktails And Their Ancient Origins.

The history of the Julep goes back to ancient Persia (modern-day Iran). Rosewater was thought to have health benefits, and the word for rosewater in old Persian is Gulab (gul=rose, ab=water). Gulab slowly made its way to the surrounding Arabic cultures, and over time, the word Gulab changed to Julāb, and it was used to describe any sweetened medicinal syrup. Julābs eventually traveled to western Europe and England; syrupy medicines are called Julaps or Julapums. By the mid-1700s, there were all kinds of julaps. Rosewater julap was called Julapum Rosatum and was used for treating Heart issues. Julapum tabaci was a tobacco-infused syrup for treating asthma, Julapum sedativum was opium syrup Julapum Stomachicum was a mint-infused syrup used to settle upset tummies. I found many kinds of other Julapums, but this is good enough. Also, most of what I found was written in Latin, and google translate can only do so much. A medical journal I found online from the 1750s calls for a Julapum Stomachicum to be a peppermint-infused sweetener mixed with sherry. What we today consider a mint julep emerges around the early 1800s. The British 1827 home medical book Oxford Night Caps refers to a mint julap as a mint syrup mixed with brandy that a parent can make to ease the upset tummy.

With its unique drinking culture, the mint julep took on a different identity in the United States. Mint juleps were dressed up and made fancy for saloon patrons looking to get buzzed. The oldest printed recipe for this saloon-style julep comes from Jerry Thomas’s 1862 edition of The Bar Tenders Guide. The formula is one table-spoonful of white pulverized sugar. And 2 1/2 tablespoonfuls of water and mix well with a spoon. 3 or 4 sprigs of fresh mint. 1 1/2 wine glass Cognac brandy, dash with Jamaica rum, and sprinkle white sugar on top. Jerry Thomas also has recipes for a gin julep, whiskey julep, a pineapple julep, pineapple syrup, and gin cocktail.

The mint julep stays a brandy cocktail for a very long time, and most bartenders and recipe books copy Jerry Thomas till around the late 1800s. Books in the late 1880s mention how the once-loved julep had fallen in favor of other more complex cocktails and is typically something only the older men order. Around this time, the mint julep recipe replaces brandy for bourbon. The first instance of this is in the 1888 book Bartender’s Manual by Theodore Proulx, where he has his recipe for a mint julep that uses bourbon instead of brandy. Whether this change is accidental or intentional, it would happen when the cocktail begins to fade from the bartender’s repertoire. As decades passed, the mint julep and whiskey julep merged till it just became standard to make a mint julep with whiskey.

Variations Of The Mint Julep.

This specific version is the whiskey julep variation of the mint julep. Had you ordered a mint julep in the 1800s, you would be given a brandy cocktail instead, but the whiskey variation is the most common one made today. All the other variations of the mint julep are almost entirely forgotten today, and almost everyone only knows of the mint julep. Jerry Thomas had recipes for a gin julep, whiskey Julep, pineapple julep, and a plain brandy julep. Harry Johnson added the Champagne Julep too in his 1882 book Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual. An 1885 book called New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef by Bacchus has nine different Julep recipes. They are not worth listing here as they are all quite lousy.

Getting The Ice Right In A Julep.

I feel the most essential part of any julep is the crushed or shaved ice you will pack the cup with. This cocktail should have the spirit of a snow cone that tastes sweet of mint and booze, and the ice should be rounded over the rim. Otherwise, it comes across as old-fashioned if you don’t pack the cup with ice, and the julep should be more of a refreshing hot daytime summer drink and not a smoky old nighttime bar drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Mint Julep

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

193

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Mint Julep as it was often made before the 1900s. This version is from the 1862 edition of the Bartenders guide but the mint julep similar to this had been used in medicine for hundreds of years.

Ingredients

  • 5 Spearmint Leaves

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

  • 3 dashes Gold Rum

Directions

  • Add the simple syrup and mint to a tumbler glass.
  • Press the mint leaves into the syrup to infuse it with the mint’s flavor.
  • Fill the mixing glass with ice and add the base spirit.
  • Mix the drink for 20 – 30 seconds.
  • Fill your serving glass with crushed ice and strain the drink into the serving glass.
  • Garnish with a bouquet of mint and dust with powdered sugar.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Milk Punch – Make This Delicious Classic 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Milk Punch Cocktail
Milk Punch Cocktail

So you may notice this is a milk punch, but I use half & half and not milk. Mixing with dairy is a pain in the ass, and that’s because alcohol, like acid, causes milk protein to bind together and make cheese. What protects the protein from binding together is fat. Regular milk doesn’t have enough fat, so you will make curds and whey punch every time instead. The trick is to balance the higher ABVs with the correct fat percentage. This one comes in around 15%, and at that abv half & half works well. Something like a white Russian, which is 30%, needs heavy cream because that’s too much booze and would curdle half & half. If you use milk, you would need to add less alcohol and water it down some to hopefully not have it curdle.

On a side note, I experimented with making this with oat milk and almond milk, and it was ok. They tasted fine, but they lacked the creaminess of actual dairy. Kind of like substituting almond milk in coffee. It’s OK but not good. Also, this follows older recipes pretty closely, but I feel this is a superior version. One of the oldest ones I could find was Jerry Thomas’s version.

• 15mls/ tea spoon of sugar
• 60mls/ 2 ounces of brandy
• 30mls/ 1 ounce rum
• remainder of glass filled with milk and ice

I like booze, but it was too boozy and the milk curdled. I took the ingredients of most of the milk punches I found, increased the fat content, and decreased the booze by a 1/4, and that’s what this recipe is. It won’t curdle, and I think the parts are a better balance.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Milk Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Milk Punch.

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Vanilla Extract

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Half u0026 Half

  • 1 oz Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Japanese Cocktail #2- Make This Delicious Prohibition Era Recipe

Japanese Cocktail Post-Prohibition Style
Japanese Cocktail Post-Prohibition Style

Jerry Thomas invented the Japanese Cocktail in the 1860s, but nothing about this cocktail is Japanese. None of the ingredients are from Japan or have any association with Japan. Some sources say it is named this to commemorate the first representative of Japan coming to the United States in the 1860s after the United States forced them to open their borders in 1853, but who the hell knows.

I like to imagine the name came about because the faint almond/cherry flavor the orgeat adds conjures up images of cherry blossom trees, but I am entirely making that up and in no way claim this to be true.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Japanese Cocktail #2

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Post prohibition Japanese Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Angostura Bitters
  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Japanese Cocktail – Make The Original 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Japanese Cocktail Pre-Prohibition
Japanese Cocktail Pre-Prohibition

Jerry Thomas invented the Japanese Cocktail in the 1860s, nothing Japanese about this cocktail. None of the ingredients are from Japan or have any association with Japan. Some sources say it is named this to commemorate the first representative of Japan coming to the United States in the 1860s after the United States forced them to open their borders in 1853, but who the hell knows.

This is the original recipe for this cocktail as it uses Boker’s/Cardamom bitters; once Boker’s went out of business, bartenders started using Angostura bitters which taste entirely different.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Japanese Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Japanese cocktail from the 1862 edition of the Bartenders guide by Jerry Thomas.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 15 oz Orgeat

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Harvard Cocktail – Make The Original 1906 George Kappeler Recipe

Harvard Cocktail
Harvard Cocktail

First popping up in George J. Kappeler’s 1906 cocktail book, Modern American Drinks, this is the sister drink to the Yale and Princeton Cocktails. I have listed the original George J. Kappeler recipe here, but the 1935 Old Waldorf Astoria recipe is probably the more well-known version. The Waldorf Astoria recipe is 1/2 oz brandy, 1 1/2 oz sweet vermouth, two dashes of orange bitters, and 1 oz soda water.

For hard-to-find books like Modern American Drinks, a great resource is http://euvslibrary.com. This website has every old rare cocktail book you could ever imagine. Yes, all of this information is available for free. You can read them in the browser or download them as a pdf. Oh, did I mention that the content on the website is free?

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Harvard Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

117

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1906 Harvard Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 3 dashes Gum Syrup

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Brandy

  • 1/2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir to chill and combine those ingredients.
  • Pour into the serving glass and gently add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


East India Cocktail – Make The Classic 1882 Harry Johnson Recipe

East India Cocktail
East India Cocktail

This is cocktail #175 in Harry Johnson’s 1882 print of the Bartenders Manual. Harry Johnson was a German-born (Specifically Prussian-born, A unified Germany didn’t exist yet) bartender and peered at Jerry Thomas. Jerry Thomas does steal a lot of Harry Johnson’s thunder since he was the first one to be published, but both created amazing recipes. Since Harry Johnson was german-born, his books are written in English and German.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

East India Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

232

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1882 East India Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.