Daiquiri – Classic Recipe & History

Daiquiri Cocktail

Daiquiri

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

241

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does the Daiquiri Taste Like?

The Daiquiri is a fantastic cocktail that can be either sweet or tart, depending on the amount of simple syrup added. Rum can be pretty sweet, to begin with, so edging on the side of tart balances the rum nicely. Many topical cocktail enthusiasts cite the daiquiri as the foundation of tiki or exotic cocktails, but it’s a traditional sour with spirit, citrus, and sweetener. It’s still a fantastic drink with endless variations.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

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Rum Rickey – Recipe & History

Rum Rickey

Rum Rickey

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

123

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Rum Rickey.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz White Rum

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Fill your serving glass with ice. Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the glass.
  • Stir and combine the ingredients and at the same time chilling the glass. Top off with more ice if you need to.
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation and give a couple gentle stirs to mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Rickey.

Invented in the Late 19th century by D.C. lobbyist Joe Rickey (At least that’s who is credited with having invented it), the rickey is a refreshing and slightly tart cocktail. This recipe is a brandy variation of the original whiskey-based rickey. More than just a recipe, the rickey became an archetype for many popular cocktails, even if you don’t realize they are structurally a rickey. The rickey cocktail structure is simple: 1/2 ounce (15 mls) citrus, 2 oz (60 mls) base spirit, and 5 oz (150 mls) carbonated beverage. For example, the rum and coke with a lime is a rickey, Dark ‘N’ Stormy, gin, and tonic; are all based on rickey structures.

What Does A Rum Rickey Taste Like?

This is my favorite version of the rickey. Something about rum and lime just goes together so well. The rum rickey has notes of molasses, toasted caramel, and lime is refreshing and delicious cocktail.

Properly Adding Soda Water.

The essential ingredient in a rickey, I feel, is the soda water and how the cocktail is prepared. Of course, the spirit and citrus are the flavors you taste, but the soda water is what provides all the texture. If you prepare it to stay as bubbly as possible, you will have an outstanding cocktail. Still, if you don’t cool the ingredients or glass properly and stir it too violently, you will end up with a flat lame cocktail, similar to drinking a flat soda. Sure the flavor will be there, but it will be flat. So here is what you do. The two things you have control over are 1). the temperature, and 2). how violently you add the soda water. First, add the spirit and citrus to a glass filled with ice. Stir them together so that they get cold and the inside of the glass chills. Even better, you could chill the glass in the freezer first, but that requires forethought. Stirring with ice works well enough on the spot. Next, when you add the soda water, do it gently and only give the drink a couple of turns to mix the soda water with the spirit and citrus. Adding and stirring the soda water like this helps maintain as much carbonation as possible, and the bubblier it is, the more refreshing it will be.

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Long Beach Iced Tea – Original Recipe & History

Long Beach Iced Tea

Long Beach Ice Tea

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

545

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Long Beach Iced Tea.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Sweet and Sour Mix

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Vodka

  • 1 oz White Rum

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1.5 oz Cranberry Juice

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients into a shaker.
  • Add a scoop of crushed ice and shake for 5 seconds.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all and serve.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Long Beach Iced Tea Taste Like?

Using Cranberry juice instead of coca-cola completely changes this cocktail. The flavor is bright and fruity, giving it an almost refreshing taste. It’s hard to say 4.5 oz of alcohol in one drink is refreshing, but cranberry juice softens it. The Long Beach Iced Tea recipe is exactly like the traditional Long Island Iced Tea except for the cranberry juice. The recipe I have provided uses Robert “Rosebud” Butt’s original Long Island recipe but substitutes the Coke for cranberry juice.

The History Of The Long Island Iced Tea

The Long Beach Iced Tea was invented by T.G.I. Fridays in 1980 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of its parent company Carlson. T.G.I. Fridays is often mistaken for inventing the Long Island Iced Tea, and while they didn’t, It is still one of the most popular drinks they sell. Although T.G.I. Fridays did create several popular variations. They made four variations: the Sparkling Iced Tea, the Long Beach Iced Tea, the Caribbean Iced Tea, and the Texas Iced Tea. The Sparkling Iced Tea replaced the Coca-Cola with champagne. The Long Beach Iced Tea replaced Coca-Cola with cranberry juice. The Caribbean Iced Tea used blue-orange liqueur instead of clear to give the drink a light green color and left out the Coke. And the Texas Ice Tea added an additional ounce of whiskey.

I understand this is supposed to be a vintage cocktail resource, and while T.G.I. Fridays is not seen as a high-end bar today, it once was. The first T.G.I. Fridays was opened in 1965 by Alan Stillman. Stillman lived on 63rd Street between First and York in New York and, while surrounded by single attractive working women, had a hard time meeting any. Alan liked to go out after work, and believe it or not, many bars in the 1960s still had policies that no women could enter unless they were with a man. Hell, women couldn’t have bank accounts until the 1960s, and it wasn’t the Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974 that women could get an account without a father or husband to manage it. But back to cocktails. Obviously, not every bar was like this, and some areas were more progressive than others, but there was still a culture of bars being too rough for single vulnerable women. Some high-end bars excluded single women, fearing their presence would distract business-minded men from making deals. Even though prohibition had helped lessen the stigma of women publicly drinking, it still took activists like Betty Friedan and others to fully break down these barriers. Alan Stillman also helped break down these barriers when he opened T.G.I. Fridays, one of the United States’ first singles bar. The original intent of T.G.I Fridays was to offer a welcoming environment that felt like home where single women and men could meet. Women didn’t need to come with a man to enter. They served high-end drinks and well-made American food. Stillman may have been looking to meet women, but he inadvertently helped bring down some of the social barriers American women faced.

Recipe Resources

Long Beach Iced Tea Article

Original Long Island Iced Tea Recipe

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L.A. Water – Cocktail Recipe

L.A. Water

L.A. Water

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a strong and tasty L.A. Water cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Midori

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange liqueur.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes

Featured Video

A friend of mine suggested I add this cocktail, and while the stuffy pretentious drinker in me turns up its nose to modern cocktails like this, the laid-back, chill me loves drinks like this. I have no idea who first made this, they are most likely still young and still alive, but I will take a wild guess and say it was first mixed somewhere in LA. The joke is that this funky-colored drink is supposed to look like tap water in Los Angeles. I get that the joke is that the water is gross and funky, but if the tap water there tasted like this, I would move to LA and never look back. No, it’s not vintage, but it’s super good.

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Piña Colada – Original Recipe & History

Pina Colada

Piña Colada

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

702

kcal
ABV

7%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Piña Colada.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Cream of Coconut

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker or blender. Add ice.
  • Vigorously shake or blend the ingredients.
  • Pour in a glass.

Notes

Featured Video

The Origins Of The Piña Colada.

The famous origin story for the Piña Colada states it was invented in Puerto Rico in the 1950s or 1960s. Three bartenders claim to have invented it. Ramon Marrero in 1952, Ricardo Garcia a couple of years later, and Ramon Mingot in 1963. Chances are they all made some variation of the same drink. Perhaps just using different amounts of each ingredient. It’s only three ingredients. I’m willing to bet they were not the first to mix rum with coconut and pineapple. The Piña Colada is the official cocktail of Puerto Rico and the national Piña Colada Day is July 10th in the United States.

The oldest reference to the Pina Colada I can find is from a 1964 menu from Senor Pico in Ghirardelli Square in San Francisco. Not every menu has it, though. Some of the earlier Senor Pico Menus do not have the Pina Colada, so it must have been added to the menu around then. Senor Pico was a concept restaurant by Victor Bergeron and part of the trader Vic’s tiki empire. Victor Bergeron wanted to experiment with a Mexican/Southern Californian-themed restaurant. The menu describes the pina colada as a mix of coconut milk, pineapple juice, and rum.

Interestingly the 1972 Trader Vic’s Cocktail Guide has a different pina colada recipe. His 1972 book does not have coconut milk in it, and before this book, I am not able to find a pina colada recipe. His 1947 edition does not have a Piña Colada, and I could not find any 1950s or 1960s reference to it other than his 1964 Senor Pico restaurant menu, but no exact recipe is given. Victor Bergeron’s 1972 recipe is:

  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum
  • 3 oz (90 mLs) Pineapple Juice
  • Blend with shaved ice and pour over ice in a tall glass with a straw.

The word Piña Colada is translated to “strained pineapple.” I always found it a weird name since it’s only referring to the pineapple juice in the cocktail. But That name makes sense for this recipe since it does not have any coconut. In 1978 Warren Zevon released his hit song “Werewolves of London.” One of the lyrics is, “I saw a werewolf drinkin’ a piña colada at Trader Vic’s. His hair was perfect.” The exact piña colada Warren references would have been the pineapple and rum only recipe. A year later, in 1979, the song “Escape” by Rupert Holmes was released. The main chorus from that song is “If you like piña coladas, And gettin’ caught in the rain”. I remember seeing an interview with Rupert Holmes when I was a child where he stated he didn’t like piña colada because he did not like the taste of coconut. So the version Rupert Holmes is referring to is the coconut and pineapple version. The first printed piña colada with coconut I could find is from the 1980 book “Manual Del Bar” by The Barmen Association of Argentina. The recipe from that book is:

  • 50 gramos de ron (1.5 oz rum)
  • 25 gramos de leche de coco (almost 1 oz coconut milk)
  • 75 gramos de jugo de ananá (2.5 oz pineapple juice)

Most cocktail recipes I am familiar with that use cream of coconut are from South America. It is much less common in North American or European cocktails. Also, I found the overwhelming majority of piña colada recipes are from 1980 to 1987. As if that was its spike in popularity after those songs came out. Every one of those 1980s recipes is a combination of rum, pineapple juice, and coconut cream/milk. Trader Vic’s recipe is the only one without coconut.

Perhaps it was invented in Puerto Rico, but the first reference I can find to it is from Trader Vic. His recipe also matches the cocktail’s odd name and makes sense. Victor Bergeron was pretty good about citing a recipe that wasn’t his own. Not for every drink, usually just the popular ones, but the Piña Colada is famous enough. He would mention Donn Beach for any recipes in his book inspired by Donn or if he learned of a cocktail while on some particular island. His Piña Colada recipe does not have a citation, so either he left it out or invented it. This reminds me of the Margarita. Most believe it is a Mexican cocktail, but the first record is from the British 1937 Cafe Royal Cocktail Book, and it is not referred to as a Mexican cocktail until 1953. It could also be that these are two unrelated recipes with the same name. Who knows.

The Best Rum To Use And Substitutions For a Piña Colada.

The best rum to use is either a white unaged rum or a very lightly aged rum. The primary cocktail flavors are pineapple and coconut, so the rum should disappear. An aged rum would muddy up the flavor and take away from the drink’s bright tropical taste. That being said, Vodka makes a great Piña Colada. Vodka is an excellent substitute for rum. Another great substitute is silver tequila. Silver tequila makes a great Piña Colada too. Almost any clear dry spirit makes a good Piña Colada. Pisco, and cachaca all work well. Again, the point is to have the spirit disappear into the drink.

Should You Just Buy Piña Colada Mix, Cream Of Coconut, Or Just Make Them From Scratch?

The Piña Colada is just three ingredeints. Equal parts rum, cream of coconut, and pineapple juice. There is no need to buy a premade mix. Don’t get me wrong, most premade Piña Colada mixes are good, but they taste artificial. Like how grape soda is good, but it doesn’t taste like actual grapes. My advice is to skip the mix and make the drink yourself.

A better question is whether to buy cream of coconut or make it from scratch. Cream of coconut is coconut simple syrup. It is both cost-effective to make your own and makes a much better product with little effort. I have a recipe for it here that I believe is the best, but premade cream of coconuts like Coco Lopez or Coco Real are great. Homemade is preferred, but most store-bought cream of coconuts are still quality products.

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Hemingway Daiquiri – Classic Recipe & History

Hemingway Daiquiri

Hemingway Daiquiri

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Hemingway Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

History Of The Hemingway Daiquiri

The Hemingway Daiquiri is not the Papa Doble. The two are often considered the same, and the Hemingway daiquiri is also called a Papa Doble. The Papa Doble was a very different cocktail that most people would not like. The Hemingway Daiquiri as we know it today started to appear around the 1960s. One of its earliest references is from the publication ” Cuba, Paloma de Vuelo Popular” by Nestor Teran. Teran refers to the cocktail as the Hemingway Special at Bar Floridita. If Hemingway had this cocktail, it was probably much later in his life (he passed in 1961), and residents knew this was not the Papa Doble but a different cocktail entirely. The 1972 Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide calls this drink the Floridita Special. Victor Bergeron’s cocktail information is often very much on point. He didn’t just know tiki but traditional cocktails and Caribbean cocktails too. As a bartender from the 1930s to 1970s, his knowledge of cocktails is trustworthy. The earliest Hemingway Daiquiri recipes are shaken with crushed ice and dirty poured into a glass like the Papa Doble, but the Trader Vic recipe is blended into a slushy cocktail. Thus taking on its current form.

By the 1990s, every publication I found simultaneously calls the Papa Doble the Hemingway Daiquiri. The list is too numerous to cite, so the example I will mention is the 1998 book “The Hemingway Cookbook” by Craig Boreth. Boreth implies that the Hemingway Daiquiri is also called the Papa Doble, Wild Daiquiri, and Daiquiri Special. A lot of names for one drink.

Recipe Resources

Papa Doble References

Hemingway Daiquiri References

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Daiquiri No.4 – The Mistranslated Recipe

Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail

Daiquiri No.4

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

155

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does the Mistranslated Daiquiri #4 Taste Like?

This is the mistranslated Daiquiri #4 recipe from the Bar La Florida cocktail book. Even though the English translation swapped the lime juice for lemon, it’s still a fabulous cocktail and my favorite of the numbered daiquiri variations from Bar La Florida. The lemon and maraschino liqueur combine perfectly and make a fantastic sour cocktail.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

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Daiquiri No. 3 – Classic Grapefruit Daiquiri

Daiquiri No.3 Cocktail

Daiquiri No. 3

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

234

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Daiquiri No.3.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

Featured Video

What Does the Daiquiri #3 Taste Like?

The Bar La Florida has three variations of the daiquiri that are fantastic. This is the grapefruit variation, and it’s beautiful. The Bar La Florida expertly balanced alcohol, tartness, sweetness, and flavor. The Daiquiri #3 still has the qualities of a daiquiri but with an unmistakable grapefruit flavor. If you are a fan of grapefruit, this is a must-try.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

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Mojito – Classic Recipe & History

Mojito Criollo Cocktail

Mojito

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

243

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Mojito Criollo Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 5 Mint Leaves

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz White Rum

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine mint leaves and simple syrup in the serving glass and muddle together.
  • Add spirit and ice to the serving glass and stir for 20 – 30 seconds.
  • Pour soda water into glass and give the drink a couple last turns to mix.

Recipe Video

Notes

Some say the mojito goes back to the mid-1500s, but I doubt that, especially as rum was just being invented about then. No one knows who invented this drink or when. All that is known is that it was created in Cuba. It is structurally a rum collins with mint, and the collins style of cocktails started to become common in the United States around the 1880s. Also, many American-style cocktails quickly made their way to the Caribbean because of trade and tourism, so it’s reasonable to assume this could have been invented as early as the 1880s. The recipe I have here is the Mojito from the 1935 Bar la Florida book. Bar la Florida was one of the most popular and influential bars in Cuba pre-Castro. It is credited with creating countless, now considered canon, Caribbean cocktails and having one of the most significant impacts on Caribbean-style cocktails. Bar La Florida referred to their Mojito as the Mojito Criollo. Like the Daiquiri from that book, this mojito uses lemons instead of lime but, also like the Daiquiri, every other recipe for the mojito I know of uses lime. I was born in the US, but my family is Cuban and every Cuban I know uses limes. Maybe this bar just had a thing with lemons. Who knows. So for the sake of consensus, I’m going to go with lime juice. Also, there is a Mojito Criollo #2 recipe in the book that uses lemon. So this adds a little variety.

My dad grows mint and limes in his backyard to make sure he is always ready to make a mojito at a moment’s notice. This is the go-to party cocktail for most Cubans I know.

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Adios Motherfucker – Recipe

Adios Motherfucker

Adios Motherfucker

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

311

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

How to make an adios motherfucker.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Sweet and Sour Mix

  • 1/2 oz  Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 2 oz Lemon Lime Soda

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the lemon-lime soda in a shaker with ice.adios
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.adios
  • Dirty pour the whole drink, ice and all, into the serving glass and gently add the lemon-lime soda on top.adios

Recipe Video

Notes

Is The AMF a Trashy Drink?

I know the name of this is Vintage American Cocktails and that this is not a vintage cocktail, but who cares. The truth is it’s a pretty good cocktail, and contrary to popular belief, it’s not that boozy. Or, if made correctly, it shouldn’t be. This cocktail has a reputation, similar to the Cosmopolitan, for being a trashy club drink young people like to order so they can say they got an Adios Motherfucker. Unfortunately, because of this connection, it’s suffered the same fate as the Cosmopolitan; A good cocktail that ordinary people are afraid to order to avoid looking trashy. Granted, its name is Adios MotherFucker, so it was destined to end up with that image. Another name is the AMF, but saying Motherfucker is a lot more fun.

Adios MotherFucker Vs Long Island Ice Tea.

It’s similar to the Long Island Ice Tea in that it has almost every different kind of spirit in it. Unlike the long island, they are in smaller quantities, and if you’re going by ABV and structure, it’s actually more similar to a John Collins than the Long Island Ice Tea.

What is the Difference Between Cointreau, Orange Liqueur, and Blue Curacao?

Cointreau and Curacao or blue curaçao are all the same liqueur. The only difference is that Cointreau is a brand name, and Blue curaçao is a general term for an orange liqueur with added blue food dye. They are all orange liqueurs and the difference between them and other orange liqueurs like triple sec all comes down to brand names and marketing gimmicks. Bols was the first to manufacture orange liqueur using the bitter oranges from the island of Curacao, owned in the Caribbean. As orange liqueur grew in popularity in Europe, other manufacturers entered the scene. Cointreau marketed theirs as being made from a triple distilled dry beet sugar spirit base, providing a more bright, clean, orange taste. They called it Cointreau triple sec. They owned the name Cointreau but not triple sec, and soon many cheap orange liqueurs flooded the market as “triple sec” liqueurs. Some branded themselves as a “Curacao” liqueur, and others began adding bright-colored food dyes to make them stand out from the others. Cointreau eventually dropped the headline triple sec from its marketing since the term was now associated with cheaper products, but the term endures. That is a brief history of how the market became flooded with triple secs, curacaos, colored curacaos, Cointreaus, etc., that are ultimately the same ingredient but cause so much confusion for so many people. For a more in-depth history of Orange liqueur, please download my app and navigate to the orange liqueur ingredient description. links at the bottom of this page

What Does The AMF Taste Like?

The Adios Motherfucker is a great cocktail. Its taste is similar to a Collins-style cocktail, and the bright blue color is fun. Even though it has the same spirits as the Long Island Ice Tea, it tastes nothing like a Long Island. The Adios has almost a boozy sparkling lemonade taste. The sweetness and soda water helps cut the drink to a more manageable alcohol level and make it (I think) a refreshing cocktail that will still give you a slight buzz.

The Most Important ingredient.

There is no ingredient in the Adios that affects the flavor in any meaningful way. There are so many different ingredients in such small amounts that they all get lost. The only advice I have for this cocktail is not to buy Blue orange liqueur but use one drop of blue food dye instead. Unless you plan to make tons of these quickly, your best bet is to buy a normal clear orange liqueur like Cointreau and add blue dye. Because if you buy blue orange liqueur, you will be trapped into only being able to use it for this and maybe a couple of other cocktails. I have a bottle of blue curacao that I bought maybe 4 or 5 years ago, and it’s still half full.

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