Cape Codder – Classic Vodka Cranberry Recipe

Cape Cod Cocktail

Cape Cod

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

215

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Cape Cod cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Vodka

  • 5 oz Cranberry Juice

Directions

  • Add ice to serving glass.
  • Pour Ingredients over the ice and into serving Glass.
  • Give the drink a few turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Cape Codder (Vodka Cranberry)

The earliest record of the Cape Cod (Cape Codder) comes from 1945 in volume 6 of the Cranberry Canners Inc. Newsletter. The article describes a New York restaurant whose owner is also a cranberry grower and the unique ways he incorporates cranberries into his menu.

“In the continental atmosphere of Pierre’s on 52 East 53rd Street, New York, the ultra-American cranberry juice is always on the menu… The restaurateur, Pierre Ferro, is also a cranberry grower and a member of the NCA… With cranberry juice, he adds vodka, a dash of fresh lime and he comes up with a Red Devil cocktail”

The Red Devil name doesn’t stick, and the cocktail only seems to catch on in the late 1950s. I can’t find any cocktail books from the 1940s through 1960s, even ones from New York, that mention it. Any mention of it in the 1950s comes from magazine articles, and it often has different names. A Samovar Vodka ad in Life Magazine calls it a Jubilee Punch. A musical from 1958 called “Say, Darling” calls it vodka and cranberry, and an article in Time Magainze from 1961 mentions how Trader Vic’s calls it a Rangoon Ruby. The June 1961 issue of the Philadelphia Inquirer called it a Jersey Wedding. The list goes on and on. The name Cape Codder, shortened to Cape Cod, started to appear in the 1960s when Ocean Spray began promoting the drink and pushing the juice market hard.

Before Thanksgiving 1959, the Department of Health announced that a few samples of Ocean Spray Cranberries from growers in Washington and Oregon had residual cancer-causing weed killer aminotriazole still on them. All Ocean Spray Cranberries products were pulled from the shelves, and the loss of an entire year’s harvest almost destroyed the company. Realizing the need to expand beyond the holidays Ocean Spray looked for any way to sell its product in new markets. They began heavily promoting Cranberry juice as a healthy alternative to soda for children and adults, dried candies cranberries as a snack, and cranberry juice as an alcoholic mixer for adults. The company took the already-known vodka and cranberry cocktail and began advertising it as a Cape Codder, further tying the name to the Ocean Spray brand. The advertising worked, and by the end of the 1960s, the cocktail was generally called a Cape Codder. Even Trader Vic had renamed his Rangoon Ruby the Cape Codder for the 1972 edition of his Bartenders Guide. The multiple names for this drink persist today, as most refer to this cocktail as simply a Vodka Cran

The Rise Of Vodka Cocktails in the 1940s.

Vodka cocktails were almost nonexistent and not popular till the 1940s. Except for the Bloody Mary, I can’t think of a single cocktail that contained vodka before the 1940s. What happened in the 1940s to change that? The Moscow Mule was invented in 1941, and its overnight success suddenly made vodka a popular spirit. Most classic vodka cocktails can be traced back to this period. Since Vodka had no history of being used as an ingredient, bartenders found it easy to replace gin with vodka and give the drink a fun new name. The screwdriver was just an orange blossom with vodka. The vodka Martini was just a martini with vodka, and a drink called the Russian Bear (most likely the origin of the White Russian) was just an Alexander with vodka instead of gin, and the list goes on.

Recipe Resources

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Adios Motherfucker – Recipe

Adios Motherfucker

Adios Motherfucker

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

311

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

How to make an adios motherfucker.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Sweet and Sour Mix

  • 1/2 oz  Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 2 oz Lemon Lime Soda

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the lemon-lime soda in a shaker with ice.adios
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.adios
  • Dirty pour the whole drink, ice and all, into the serving glass and gently add the lemon-lime soda on top.adios

Recipe Video

Notes

Is The AMF a Trashy Drink?

I know the name of this is Vintage American Cocktails and that this is not a vintage cocktail, but who cares. The truth is it’s a pretty good cocktail, and contrary to popular belief, it’s not that boozy. Or, if made correctly, it shouldn’t be. This cocktail has a reputation, similar to the Cosmopolitan, for being a trashy club drink young people like to order so they can say they got an Adios Motherfucker. Unfortunately, because of this connection, it’s suffered the same fate as the Cosmopolitan; A good cocktail that ordinary people are afraid to order to avoid looking trashy. Granted, its name is Adios MotherFucker, so it was destined to end up with that image. Another name is the AMF, but saying Motherfucker is a lot more fun.

Adios MotherFucker Vs Long Island Ice Tea.

It’s similar to the Long Island Ice Tea in that it has almost every different kind of spirit in it. Unlike the long island, they are in smaller quantities, and if you’re going by ABV and structure, it’s actually more similar to a John Collins than the Long Island Ice Tea.

What is the Difference Between Cointreau, Orange Liqueur, and Blue Curacao?

Cointreau and Curacao or blue curaçao are all the same liqueur. The only difference is that Cointreau is a brand name, and Blue curaçao is a general term for an orange liqueur with added blue food dye. They are all orange liqueurs and the difference between them and other orange liqueurs like triple sec all comes down to brand names and marketing gimmicks. Bols was the first to manufacture orange liqueur using the bitter oranges from the island of Curacao, owned in the Caribbean. As orange liqueur grew in popularity in Europe, other manufacturers entered the scene. Cointreau marketed theirs as being made from a triple distilled dry beet sugar spirit base, providing a more bright, clean, orange taste. They called it Cointreau triple sec. They owned the name Cointreau but not triple sec, and soon many cheap orange liqueurs flooded the market as “triple sec” liqueurs. Some branded themselves as a “Curacao” liqueur, and others began adding bright-colored food dyes to make them stand out from the others. Cointreau eventually dropped the headline triple sec from its marketing since the term was now associated with cheaper products, but the term endures. That is a brief history of how the market became flooded with triple secs, curacaos, colored curacaos, Cointreaus, etc., that are ultimately the same ingredient but cause so much confusion for so many people. For a more in-depth history of Orange liqueur, please download my app and navigate to the orange liqueur ingredient description. links at the bottom of this page

What Does The AMF Taste Like?

The Adios Motherfucker is a great cocktail. Its taste is similar to a Collins-style cocktail, and the bright blue color is fun. Even though it has the same spirits as the Long Island Ice Tea, it tastes nothing like a Long Island. The Adios has almost a boozy sparkling lemonade taste. The sweetness and soda water helps cut the drink to a more manageable alcohol level and make it (I think) a refreshing cocktail that will still give you a slight buzz.

The Most Important ingredient.

There is no ingredient in the Adios that affects the flavor in any meaningful way. There are so many different ingredients in such small amounts that they all get lost. The only advice I have for this cocktail is not to buy Blue orange liqueur but use one drop of blue food dye instead. Unless you plan to make tons of these quickly, your best bet is to buy a normal clear orange liqueur like Cointreau and add blue dye. Because if you buy blue orange liqueur, you will be trapped into only being able to use it for this and maybe a couple of other cocktails. I have a bottle of blue curacao that I bought maybe 4 or 5 years ago, and it’s still half full.

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Moss Head Cocktail – Recipe

Moss Head Cocktail

Moss Head Cocktail

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

262

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Improved Midori Sour No. 2 Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Egg Whites

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Elderflower Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Midori

  • 2 oz Vodka

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

Making A Midori Fizz.

The moss head is my attempt to make an improved Midori sour because the Midori sour is not a very well-balanced drink, in my opinion. It has very little alcohol and is painfully sweet. My goal for this cocktail was to make a better Midori sour by reducing the amount of Midori, adding floral flavor to complement the melon taste, and giving the drink a bit more alcohol to level out the sweetness. It’s less one-dimensional and taste more like a regular cocktail. The egg whites also add a nice creamy texture that reminds me of those fun Korean melon milk drinks.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Cosmopolitan – Original Recipe & History

Cosmopolitan Cocktail

Cosmopolitan

5 from 2 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

250

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Cosmopolitan Cocktail. A Classic New York Cocktail that is as delicious as it is beautiful.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Cranberry Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Citrus Favored Vodka

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Recipe Video

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Cosmopolitan.

Like the Margarita, many people claim to have invented the Cosmopolitan cocktail. The oldest known written reference to it comes from the 1934 book Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars. This is a somewhat different drink other than the name and a light pink hue. The 1934 recipe is a Jigger of Gordon’s Gin, two dash Cointreau, Juice of 1 Lemon, and 1 tsp Raspberry Syrup. While many have claimed to invent the Cosmo, the internationally recognized one was created by Toby Cecchini.

The Cosmopolitan is not a very old cocktail; it was invented in New York in 1987 by Toby Cecchini while working at The Odeon. Toby’s Cosmo was a huge hit. It quickly spread across New York and eventually caught national attention once celebrities started getting photographed drinking New York’s fabulous new bright pink cocktail. It gets its distinctive color from the single ounce of cranberry juice added. The Cosmopolitan enjoyed mild fame throughout the mid-90s, but that changed once Sex and the City aired in 1998. The fictional character Carrie Bradshaw’s favorite cocktail turned the Cosmopolitan into an overnight superstar.

Women wanting to imitate Carrie became obsessed with this cocktail. Sadly just as fast as it became the hot new drink, it became associated with trashy rich girls and a social faux pas to order. This is unfortunate because this is a beautiful drink.

What Does The Cosmopolitan Taste Like?

The Cosmopolitan is a delicious cocktail. It is pretty strong (around 25% abv) and not overly sweet. It gets its distinctive bright pink color from the single ounce of cranberry juice added. This adds a slightly sweet and tart red fruit flavor to the cocktail that is structurally a vodka daisy. A Cosmo tastes more like a cranberry margarita than anything else and is just as strong if made correctly. Sadly, it is a bit of a faux pas to order and is seen as a “girly” drink with a promiscuous connotation. Again independent of history, the Cosmopolitan cocktail is anything but that, but it can’t escape the image it’s been given.

There isn’t any best vodka to use with this. The whole idea about mixing with vodka is the spirit should be invisible to the other flavors, and even most cheap to the middle of the road, vodka tastes fine. I wouldn’t use expensive or nice vodka.

Should The Cosmopolitan Be Made With Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, Or Triple Sec?

The essential ingredient in a Cosmopolitan is the orange liqueur. Cointreau, grand mariner, curaçao, and triple sec are the same ingredients. They are all orange liqueurs. All the different names are either due to brand names or marketing gimmicks. However, it is essential to try them all and find one you like, and stick with it. I like Cointreau’s clean, dry, bright orange flavor the best, and I use it in the Cosmopolitan. Also, Grand Mariner’s base spirit is aged brandy, so it has a brown tint, and Cointreau is clear. If you use grand Mariner in this cocktail, it will have a muddy pink color instead of bright pink. For the appearance to look proper, use Cointreau or another clear orange liqueur. Many other orange liqueurs are good, but I have not found one for under $20 that I liked. Any in the sub $10 range are garbage. I love a deal and try not to spend more than is reasonable, but orange liqueur is one ingredient you can not get cheap.

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Blue Lagoon – Recipe

Blue Lagoon

Blue Lagoon

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

291

kcal
ABV

15%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Blue Lagoon cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Vodka

  • 5 oz Lemonade

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass and if you do not have blue orange liqueur then add 1 drop of blue food dye.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes

Featured Video

The History of The Blue Lagoon.

This cocktail is credited to being invented by Andy MacElhone, son of Harry MacElhone, but I don’t buy that. There is no way this is a French cocktail. First off, there is no evidence that I or it seems anyone else has found that he created this. Many people say that they heard from others that heard from someone else who read it online that he made it. Second, it’s made with blue orange liqueur, and I have never heard of a French cocktail that uses blue orange liqueur. They have Grand Marnier and Cointreau in their backyard; why would they use a cheap gimmick liqueur. Third, this is kind of a gimmick drink. Don’t get me wrong, it’s good, but it’s still a gimmick. It’s a flavorless spirit with lemonade and cheap orange liqueur.

A famous bar like Harry’s New York Bar in Paris has a reputation to keep up, and this drink does not measure up to that reputation. It lacks a French complexity that cocktails like the Scofflaw, monkey gland, or even the French 75 have. It also lacks the quality of the Kir or mimosa. Those seem like French cocktails to me, but the Blue Lagoon does not.

Using Blue Orange Liqueur.

Isn’t this drink super pretty? It’s a boozy cool blue lemonade. This blue is a blue orange liqueur, but if you don’t own blue orange liqueur/curacao, add one drop of blue food dye to the drink.

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