Mizuwari – Proper Recipe

Mizuwari
Mizuwari

What Does Mizuwari Mean?

The mizuwari is an iconic Japanese cocktail, and it means to cut with water. Cutting whiskey with water is nothing unique to this cocktail, as even in traditional Irish whiskey, drinking the whiskey is cut with a bit of water to open up the flavors. The difference here is how much the whiskey is thinned with water. Many whiskey drinkers will use just the water that melts off the ice, or some will add a single ounce of water, but the mizuwari is massive, a 1-2 or 1-2.5 ratio of whiskey to water.

Why Drink a Mizuwari?

The mizuwari and Japanese highball has a similar soul to them. They have a clean, unmistakable whiskey flavor but are not overpowering like a short, old-fashioned whiskey cocktail. They are refreshing like a collins or rickey, but without any extra flavors the collins or rickey bring. They are clean, easy-to-drink cocktails, with whiskey the only unobstructed flavor. The mizuwari is more accessible to drink than the highball as it does not even have carbonation. But do not be mistaken. This is not just water added to whiskey. If done right, this can be a great cocktail. If done wrong, this can be the flattest and saddest drink.

The Most Important Part To Making a Mizuwari.

The mizuwari is all about technique. It’s just two ingredients (3 including the ice), but those two ingredients can become something delicious if appropriately combined. So the essential part of making a mizuwari is the process of how it is made. It’s similar to making a Japanese highball but just a little bit simpler.

1). Start with a chilled glass. Stemware matters too. A highball, collins, or zombie glass will work too (they are all pretty similar anyway). The drink needs a heavy broad base to hold extra coldness, and the straight sides make stirring easier. Pint glasses are fine, but they taper to a smaller base, meaning less cold surface area to whiskey ratio. Next, add your ice, and since the glass is already chilled, there is no need to use the ice to chill it. Suppose the glass is not chilled. Stir the ice to cool the glass and dump the water that has melted off. Also, the ice is vital. This is the ice served with the drink, so it should be challenging, clear, and freezing ice. This is done to dilute the whiskey as little as possible before adding the water. If you are adding water, you are diluting it. Still, it is preferable to cut it as little as possible before adding water because it helps maintain the whiskey to water ratio you serve it at length. If you combine the whiskey and water at a 1-2.5 ratio and then add ice, the ice will melt and change the ratio to something like 1-3 or more. If you do it the preferable way, you can see how much water was added by chilling the whiskey and adding more or less water as needed and not have melting ice change that ratio.

2). Next, add your whiskey and stir for maybe 10 seconds. This is to cool the whiskey down to near freezing so that once you add the water, the ratio is not changed while the ice melts and cools the drink to near freezing. When preparing a Japanese highball, you are concerned about preserving the carbonation with cooler temperatures that you do not need to worry about here. This part is just to protect the water to whiskey ratio.

3). Next, add the refrigerated water. The typical ratio is 1 part whiskey to 2 – 2.5 parts chilled water. You’ll want to vary this based on how strongly flavored the whiskey is and how much the melting ice already lengthened it. You aim to balance and open up the flavors, so a more intensely flavored whiskey may want 5oz water to 2oz whiskey, and a more subtle whiskey would work better with 4oz soda water to 2oz whiskey. Know the whiskey and add what you think will make it taste better. Also, use good-tasting filtered water. You’re not adding juice or syrups, so there is nothing to mask lousy water or ice.

4). Finally, give it a few last stirs to mix. Although don’t just turn the spoon in a circle but bring it to the bottom and pull the whiskey up into the water. Do this just a couple of times to evenly mix the drink. A lot of work for a simple two-ingredient drink, right?

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Mizuwari

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Japanese
Servings

1

servings
Calories

150

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a mizuwari

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Scotch

  • 5 oz Water

Directions

  • Add ice and whiskey to a chilled glass and stir the two to chill the whiskey
  • Add chilled filtered water and stir just a couple more times to mix the two ingredients.

Notes

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Rob Roy – Classic Waldorf Astoria Recipe

Rob Roy
Rob Roy

The History Of The Rob Roy Cocktail.

The earliest known Rob Roy recipe comes from the 1908 Boothby book “The Worlds Drinks and How to Mix Them” Boothby credits the cocktail to Johnny Kent of San Francisco. His recipe is a scotch, dry vermouth, and angostura bitters cocktail, which is very good. The more common recipe is the Waldorf-Astoria recipe which is 1:1 scotch and sweet vermouth with orange bitters. Other than scotch, the two recipes are entirely different. Both are fantastic cocktails, and even though the Waldorf-Astoria recipe is more popular, the Boothby recipe is worth trying.

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Rob Roy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

193

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic Rob Roy.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1.5 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

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Rusty Nail – Original Recipe

Rusty Nail Cocktail
Rusty Nail Cocktail

The History Of The Rusty Nail Cocktail.

The standard history of the Rusty Nail cocktail is it was invented in the 1930s at the British Industries Fair and was called a B.I.F cocktail. However, I cannot find any reference to it in American or European cocktail books from the 1930s to the 1960s. The earliest reference to the Rusty Nail I can find is from the April 1968 issue of Playboy. In the nightlife and Liqueur section, Liqueur Legerdemain, Thomas Mario says, “The latest, the Rusty Nail, is also one of the most mellow—a simple libation of Scotch on the rocks with a float of Drambuie.” Thomas refers to the Rusty Nail cocktail as a new liqueur cocktail, and it was around this time the first Rusty Nail was printed in a cocktail book. The 1972 Trader Vic’s Bartender Guide has a recipe for a Rusty Nail that is 1:1 Scotch and Drambuie. Searching the American and British newspaper archives, the Rusty Nail cocktail was mentioned in the 1980s. Looking through all this, I could not locate the cocktail’s inventor or where it originated from. It’s more likely the Rusty Nail was invented in the 1960s than the 1930s.

How To Mix a Rusty Nail.

The trick to mixing an excellent rusty nail is to mix it as little as possible. Some recipes cool the scotch and then add the Drambuie without any additional mixing. This cocktail is in the same spirit as the B&B, and it benefits from a less chilled and slight separation of the ingredients.

The ratio of Drambuie to Scotch is variable too. The lower end tends to be 1/2 oz (15 mLs) to 2 oz (60 mLs) scotch, and the higher end is the Trader Vic style 1:1. I prefer the ratio below of 2/3 oz Drambuie to 2 oz Scotch.

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Rusty Nail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

216

kcal
ABV

40%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Rusty Nail.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Drambuie

  • 2 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink
  • Strain into glass with a large ice cube.

Notes

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Rattlesnake – Make The Delicious 1930s Savoy Recipe

Rattlesnake
Rattlesnake

What Does The Rattlesnake Taste Like?

This tastes very similar to a whiskey sour with egg whites. They taste almost the same, but the small addition of absinthe does add an excellent herbal profile to the cocktail. If you like sours and herbal flavors, this is one to try. The Savoy Cocktail Book claimed it was so strong it could cure a rattlesnake bite, but it’s not that intense, it’s pretty lovely, and I would say an improvement over the standard whiskey sour.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Rattlesnake

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

231

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Rattlesnake Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole Egg White

  • 2 dashes Absinthe

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without any ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when it is not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Bobby Burns – Original Savoy Recipe

Bobby Burns
Bobby Burns

About Bobby Burn And His Poetry.

Bobby Burns was an 18th-century Scottish poet. Every English speaker in the world knows his poetry, who has celebrated Valentine’s Day, or attended a New Year’s party. Robert Burns wrote many famous poems and songs, but two of them are still commonly used today; Auld Lang Syne and Red, Red, Rose. Sung at the turn of the year, everyone knows the tune to Auld Lange Syne even if they don’t know the words. Written in 18th-century scot (a mix of modern English and Scottish Gaelic), the poem is bittersweet in its lyrics as it reminisces about the experiences shared between two friends. And Red, Red Rose is just that; everyone knows that. “Oh my love is like a red, red rose, That’s newly sprung in June: Oh my love is like the Melodie, that’s sweetly played in tune.”

What Does The Bobby Burns Taste Like?

The Bobby Burns is a fabulous cocktail that tastes very similar to a Manhattan but with a slightly more herbal flavor. If you like manhattans, then this is a must.

The Most Important Ingredient.

Like the Manhattan, the essential ingredient in the Bobby Burns is the sweet vermouth. The other two ingredients are crucial too, but the sweet vermouth is critical. The sweet vermouth is where you have the most play and the most diverse flavors to work with. The sweet vermouth is what carries this drink and lends the most flavor. It has the most meaningful impact on the cocktail, so pick a good one.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

Opened in 1893 The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American style cocktails in London to the British upperclass. The American Bar has always been a high end bar but what really set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became it’s head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high end hotel bars, but Harry found himself out oIn 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book. f work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the american prohibition was coming to an end the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar and a year later they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934 The Savoy Cocktail Book documents all of the bars best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era, European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there though. A cocktail cost around $250 there and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Here is the original Scots Auld Lang Syne and an English translation for fun.

Auld Lang Syne (Original Scots)

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp!
And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes
And pu’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary foot
Sin auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl’d i’ the burn,
Frae mornin’ sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right guid willy waught,
For auld lang syne.

Auld Lang Syne (“Days Long Ago” English Translation)

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And days long ago?

For days long ago, my dear,
For days of long ago,
We’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
For the days of long ago.

And surely you’ll have your stein!
And surely I’ll have mine!
And we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
For the days of long ago.

We two have run about the hills,
And picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered many a weary mile,
Since the days long ago.

We two have paddled in the stream,
From morning sun till supper time;
But the broad seas between us have roared
Since the days long ago.

And here’s my hand, my trusty friend!
And give me your hand too!
And we’ll take a good willed drink,
For the days of long ago.

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Bobby Burns

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

186

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Bobby Burns cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Benedictine

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1.5 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for about 10 seconds. You don’t want to over stir the drink as the cocktail taste better a little warmer and less diluted than normal.
  • Strain into glass and garnish with an expressed lemon peel.

Recipe Video

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Avenue – A Delicious Classic 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail

Avenue Cocktail
Avenue Cocktail

The History Of The Avenue Cocktail.

The Avenue Cocktail was first written in London’s 1937 Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. The Author, William Tarling, is credited for creating this fantastic cocktail and many other more famous ones. The first written recipe for the margarita is from the Royal Cafe Cocktail Book. Whether he is the actual creator of the margarita is up for debate, but he is recognized as the creator of the Avenue cocktail.

What Does The Avenue Taste Like?

The Avenue is a beautiful cocktail that is both strong and balanced. The gentler mix of brandy and scotch blends well with the Passion fruit, pomegranate, and orange flavors and creates an almost European tropical cocktail. William Tarling used lesser-known and exotic ingredients, and the Avenue Cocktail displays that. At 60 mLs of the European spirit and 40 mLs of exotic tropical flavors, the Avenue has one foot in Europe and one foot in the exotic. Unfortunately, this isn’t something you can order at any bar. Most bars, even high-end ones, have probably never made this before, and passion fruit juice is not a commonly held ingredient. If you want to order this out, you will first need to ask if the bar has passion fruit juice, and if they do,eed to you will also n give them the recipe. This will most likely be one you make for yourself and friends at home.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

Balancing The Flavors Of This Cocktail.

The most essential ingredient in the Avenue is both brandy and scotch. This is a very mellow drink, and a smoother brandy and scotch balance the drink well. The passion fruit, grenadine, and orange liqueur are not overly assertive in this cocktail, and if you use a powerful flavored spirit for the brandy or scotch, it tips the scale too much. Though this isn’t a make or break for the drink, use it if there is brandy or scotch you like. That being said, a smoky scotch will ruin this drink. Smoke, tobacco, or peat moss flavors will not mix with the other flavors.

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Avenue Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

190

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Avenue cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Passion Fruit Juice
  • 1 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 1 tsp

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Scotch
  • 1 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Japanese Highball – Proper Technique & Recipe

Japanese Highball
Japanese Highball

How The Japanese Highball Is A Structurally Correct Highball.

While many long drinks in tall glasses tend to be called highballs and are often thought of that way, a structurally correct highball is simply 1 part spirit, 2-2.5 parts carbonated beverage, and optional bitters or citrus peel. They do not contain juice or additional sweetener. I love this cocktail, and it’s usually what I often make for myself when I’m home. It goes down easy and gives me the pleasure of drinking a beer without the bloat. While the Japanese did not create the highball, they have maintained the classic highball better than American or British cultures. The highball has continued to stay a popular beverage there.

Keep This In Mind When Drinking A Japanese Highball.

Again even though it’s called a Japanese highball, it was not invented by the Japanese. It’s called that because it’s still a trendy cocktail with Japanese business people after work. Similar to how the Japanese jigger was originally American, it eventually fell out of fashion in the USA and remained popular in Japan. Sadly most Americans find this cocktail dull at first taste and need to be told its history or how it’s popular in Japan to say, “oh, ok. I see”. American and British cocktail culture is one more strong drink with juice-filled big flavors, and those are good, but this cocktail is all about subtlety done perfectly. This cocktail is all about the perfect technique.

The Most Important Part To Making A Japanese Highball.

Most cocktails live in a gradient from good to bad and fall somewhere between. How well-made or poorly made a cocktail will end up is based on ingredients and preparation. The most crucial part of creating a Japanese highball and the mizuwari is your technique. How well you prepare each ingredient before moving on to the next step will make or break this cocktail. No joke, this can only be 1 of 2 things, perfect or awful. Learning how to prepare this cocktail taught me more about mixing drinks than any other cocktail.

1). Start with a chilled glass. Stemware matters too. Use a highball, collins, or zombie glass (they are all pretty similar anyway). The drink needs a heavy broad base to hold extra coldness, and the straight sides make stirring easier. Pint glasses are delicate, but they taper to a smaller base which means less cold surface area to whiskey ratio. Next, add your ice, and since the glass is already chilled, there is no need to use the ice to chill it. If the glass is not chilled, stir the ice to cool the glass and dump the water that has melted off. Also, the ice is vital. This is the ice served with the drink, so it should be challenging, clear, and freezing ice. This is done to dilute the whiskey as little as possible before adding the soda water. It should be refreshing bubbly soda water lengthening the whiskey, and not warmed melted ice.

2). Next, add your whiskey and stir for maybe 10 seconds. This is to cool the whiskey down to near freezing so that once you add the soda water, the warmth of the whiskey does not force carbonation to leave the drink. You don’t want to over stir and add risk adding too much water to the whiskey, thus diluting it too much and making for a flat cocktail. Ice is typically around 0°F (-18°C), and whiskey freezes at -17°F (-27°C). So if you keep stirring, it will keep getting colder and colder until it becomes the same temperature as the ice, 0°F, but it doesn’t need to get that cold. The drink is getting far colder than it needs to be and gaining extra flat melted ice. It just needs to match the temperature of the soda water. Soda water will be refrigerated, making it around 34°F (1°C). Then again, you don’t know when you have hit 34°F, so just stir for 10 seconds. That will get you in the right ballpark.

3). Next, add the soda water. The ratio is 1 part whiskey to 2 – 2.5 parts soda. You’ll want to vary this based on how strongly flavored the whiskey is. You aim to balance and open up the flavors, so a more intensely flavored whiskey may want 5oz soda water to 2oz whiskey, and a more subtle whiskey would work better with 4oz soda water to 2oz whiskey. Know the whiskey and add what you think will make it taste better. Also, how you pour is essential too. Don’t be violent and pour it in. Pour gently and down the side of the glass to maintain as much carbonation as possible. The warmer and more aggressive the pour, the more bubbles will leave.

4). Finally, give it just two last stirs. Although don’t just turn the spoon in a circle; bring it to the bottom and pull the whiskey up into the soda water. Do this just two times to evenly mix the drink while losing as little carbonation as possible. A lot of work for a simple two-ingredient drink, right?

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Japanese Highball

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

4

servings
Calories

150

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Japanese Highball.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Scotch

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Fill your serving glass with ice and combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the glass.
  • Stir and combine the ingredients and at the same time chilling the glass.
  • Top off with more ice if you need to.
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation and give a couple gentle stirs to mix.

Notes

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Blood & Sand – Original Recipe And History

Blood and Sand
Blood and Sand

What Does a Blood & Sand Taste Like And Why Is It Called That?

What a gross name for such a tasty drink. It’s named after the 1922 silent film Blood and Sand. The movie is about a young matador who gets caught up in the glitz and glamour of bullfighting, has an affair, and dies while trying to redeem himself. I never saw it, that’s what IMDB says, but it sounds like a typical 1920s movie. I shouldn’t make fun of its period; one of my favorite movies, Metropolis, is from 1927. The taste is hard to describe because a lot is going on in this drink. It’s half Rob Roy/Manhattan, and the other half is tequila sunrise-like. I guess that’s the best way to describe it. It’s like a Manhattan, and a tequila sunrise had a baby.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Recipe Resources

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Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Blood and Sand

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

158

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Blood and Sand cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 2/3 oz

  • Cherry Liqueur
  • 2/3 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2/3 oz

  • Scotch

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.