Santa Cruz Rum Daisy – Classic Recipe

Santa Cruz Rum Daisy

Santa Cruz Rum Daisy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

134

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Santa Cruz Rum Daisy cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 dash Gum Syrup

  • 3 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted
  • Pour into the serving glass
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Daisy Style Cocktail.

The daisy was another early cocktail style emerging around the same time as the crusta and many other early standard sour cocktails. The Daisy is essentially a crusta with an ounce of soda water to cut the intensity and make the cocktail more refreshing. First appearing in the 1862 edition of the Bartender’s Guide by Jerry Thomas, The daisy is a beautiful cocktail if you find the standard sour is a bit too strong.

What Does The Daisy Taste Like?

What I like about each of the classic daisy cocktails is each has a unique flavor they add for complexity. The whiskey daisy has an almond and cherry flavor, the brandy daisy has an orange flavor, and the Santa Cruz rum daisy has a slight maraschino liqueur flavor. Balanced nicely with the rum and lemon juice, the rum daisy is a delightful tasting cocktail.

Use The Right Kind Of Rum.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is the kind of rum. Unlike most cocktails, this one benefits from an excellent smooth gold rum as none of the other ingredients are made to overshadow the base spirit. The caramel flavor of the rum is front and center of this cocktail and accentuated by the maraschino cherry liqueur, so nicer sipping rum results in a superior product.

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Jungle Juice – Recipe & History

Jungle Juice Cocktail

Jungle Juice

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

182

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an amazing Jungle Juice cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Guava Juice

  • 1/2 oz Papaya Juice

  • 1/2 oz Apricot Juice

  • 1/2 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 1/2 oz Apple Juice

  • 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass and combine all the ingredients in the serving glass
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix

Notes

Featured Video

Everyone knows jungle juice is just a mix of whatever you have on hand. Well, believe it or not, jungle juice does have a history, and it Is made with whatever you have on hand. The name jungle juice was created during World War II by the American soldiers fighting in the pacific. There was no guarantee when your next supply shipment would come on these dense, heavily forested Islands or what would be in them. So they made do with whatever booze they got and whatever mixers (mostly fruit) they had around. Thus jungle juice was created. So it is correct that there is no official jungle juice recipe and an actual jungle juice is whatever you got mixed. I have provided here a fancy fruit juice recipe with booze, but you can do whatever the hell you want. If you don’t have any idea of what you wish to then hopefully, this recipe helps give you an idea.

Again, you can technically use whatever you want, but this is a fantastic recipe. Everyone I know who has had this is blown back by it, and then when I explain the whole jungle juice history are left very impressed. It is a lot of ingredients, but they all go together very well in the amounts I have listed.

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Mai Tai – Original Recipe & History

Mai Tai

Mai Tai

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Mai Tai cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Gold Rum

  • 1 oz Black Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and develops a frost.
  • Strain into glass with ice and garnish with a bouquet of mint leaves.

Notes

Featured Video

The History of The Mai Tai.

The Mai Tai has unfortunately become the rum dumpster of tiki drinks. Anything remotely tiki-like is called a Mai Tai. Here is the original recipe for the Mai Tai created in 1944 by Victor Bergeron at his Trader Vic’s bar in Oakland, California. The Mai Tai predates the Tiki craze of the 1950 and 60s and is viewed as the quintessential tiki cocktail. The book describes how Victor Bergeron created the drink and how it got its name. The Mai Tai got its’ name when Victor gave the first two he made to two Tahitian friends of his. One of them exclaimed, “Mai Tai-Roa Ae” which translates to “Out of this world-the best.” Thus the cocktail earned its name, the Mai Tai. Contrary to popular belief, the Mai Tai is not Hawaiian or Polynesian. The cocktail was created in 1944 by Victor Bergeron in Oakland, California, at his Polynesian-themed bar, Trader Vic’s Bar. The Tiki drink craze originated in California immediately after the repeal of prohibition. Both Victor Bergeron and Donn Beach are credited with creating the first tiki-themed bars. In 1933 Donn opened Donn the Beachcomber in Hollywood, and in 1934 Vic opened Trader Vic’s Bar in the Bay Area, and still to this day, almost every famous Tiki cocktail was one of their creations.

What Does The Mai Tai Taste Like?

The Mai Tai doesn’t taste like most people think it does because they have not had a real one made with good ingredients. Most are just overly artificially sweet drinks made with pre-made Mai Tai mixers. While there are better Mai Tai mixers, even the best don’t compare to one made with natural ingredients. So what should a good Mai Tai taste like? A good Mai Tai should have a slight molasses taste with solid almond, cherry, orange, and citrus notes. Most mixers and orgeat syrups taste like almonds and the flavor most of these syrups miss is the cherry flavor. This leads to why orgeat is the essential ingredient in the mai tai and why there is no substitute for good orgeat.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The essential ingredient in the Mai Tai is the orgeat syrup. The orange liqueur is also necessary, but the orgeat you use will make or break this drink. So what is orgeat, and what does a good orgeat taste like? The classic 1800s French orgeat is a bitter almond syrup. Bitter almonds taste very different from sweet almonds, which are what we typically eat. Almonds are part of the Rosaceae (rose) family of plants, and all Rosaceae plant seeds contain varying levels of amygdalin which the body processes into cyanide. Bitter almonds are not sold in the US anymore because they produce around 1000x the level of cyanide as sweet almonds. You could eat sweet almonds all day and be fine, but ten bitter almonds will kill a grown man. That’s also why they say not to eat apple seeds since they are part of the same family. Amygdalin smells and tastes like cherries. If you are curious to smell and taste this exact flavor, go to the grocery store and buy some almond extract in the baking aisle. Almond baking extracts are made from bitter almonds with the amygdalin neutralized. Orgeat should not taste like sweet almond milk; Orgeat should taste like almonds and cherries. And this is what 90% of orgeat syrup and Mai Tai mixers get wrong. They taste like almonds. If you want to know what made the Mai Tai famous and taste the original, then do some research and buy a bottle of top-shelf orgeat. These sold in stores have the cyanide neutralized and still taste great. I recommend just spending the money and buying a good one. I’ve tried making my own with an old 1800s barley water orgeat syrup recipe I found and used bitter almond extract instead of natural bitter almonds. It tasted spot on in the end, but it cost 2x as much as buying it, took a whole day to make, was a lot of work, and was not much better than a 9 oz bottle I could have bought for 13 bucks. Sure, that’s a steep price for 9 oz, but your only other option is a gross drink. Sadly there is no substitute for a good orgeat.

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