Frisco Sour – Classic Recipe

Frisco Sour Cocktail

Frisco Sour

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Frisco Sour cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

Benedictine makes anything taste herbal, and this is an herbal tasting Whiskey Sour. Despite that description, it is good, and the Benedictine balances well with the rest of the drink. Don’t buy Benedictine to try this, but give it a shot if you have some.

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Boulevardier – Original Recipe & History

Boulevardier Cocktail

Boulevardier

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Boulevardier. The perfect blend of sweet and bitter aperitifs with a nice bourbon base. 

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed orange peel.

Recipe Video

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier was invented in Paris in the early 1920s by an American journalist, Erskine Gwynne. We know this because the Boulevardier was first recorded in the 1927 book Barflies and Cocktails by Harry MacElhone. In a section at the back of the book titled “Cocktails Around Town” by Arthur Moss, he states that Erskine Gwynne comes to parties making this cocktail. It’s essentially a bourbon variation of the Negroni. The word boulevardier is a French term for a wealthy, fashionable socialite man. Similar to the English term “man about town,” It is easy to mispronounce the name if you don’t speak French ( I don’t, and I had to look it up the first time I heard of this drink ), but the phonetic way to say it is “bool-ah-vard-ee-a.” If you say this wrong the first few times, you are in good company because everyone struggles with the name of this cocktail at first, so Google it to hear someone say it.

How To Order A Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier is a very cool drink to order and has tricked people into thinking I am more sophisticated than I am. The Negroni has an old man connotation, but the boulevardier is what young high-class men order. In addition, any bar can make it. Every bar, from your small average corner bar to a high-class craft bar, and you won’t look out of place ordering it either. There are very few cocktails you can say that about. So if the bar has a liquor license, they can make the boulevardier. The bartender will already know what it is, and it will be made pretty well.

What Does The Boulevardier Taste Like?

The boulevardier is a very well-balanced tasting cocktail. The bitter medicinal flavor of the Campari is complimented nicely by the herbal sweet Vermouth, with a nice caramel-y, vanilla-y bourbon base. It’s a fantastic and straightforward drink worthy of all its praise. That being said, it is not for everyone. I like strong drinks and herbal flavors, which are perfect for someone like me. On the other hand, my wife is more a Moscow Mule kind of person, and she would never want a drink like this. If you like Manhattans or Negronis, you will love it, but if you are more of a rum and coke or Moscow mule kind of person, this cocktail, b will not like the boulevardier.

Variations Of This Cocktail.

Popular variations of this kind of cocktail are:

A Nice Vermouth Makes A World Of Difference.

The most essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and while bourbon provides a nice vanilla and toasted oak base to the drink and does matter, it’s the sweet vermouth that will make the most significant difference. The strong Campari and vermouth flavors overpower the subtle bourbon flavors. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones out there. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it oxidizes after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of them spoil before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for an average 750mLs bottle of sweet vermouth, you will end up wasting half of it anyway, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

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Ward Eight – Original Recipe & History

Ward Eight

Ward Eight

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

200

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Ward Eight cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

  • 3 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
  • Top off with soda water. Stir to combine.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Ward Eight (Ward 8) Cocktail.

The Ward Eight cocktail was invented by Charlie Carter while working at the Locke-Ober in Boston Massachusetts. To Celebrate his win in 1896 (most Ward Eight recipes online say 1898 but he was elected to that position in 1896) to the Eighth Ward district of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, Martin Lomasney, hosted a party at the Locke-Ober and asked the barman to make several unique drinks. The party would vote on the drinks and select the best one.

“A good many years back, Martin Lomasney delivered the eighth ward for a certain gentleman who, to show his gratitude, threw a party at his club. Charlie Carter was mixing drinks at the club at the time. The host asked Charlie to mix up several different kinds of drinks for his guest, so that they might select the one they liked best. … All were of one mind on the selection. … When it came to a name, they again left it to Charlie, so he promptly christened the newcome the “Ward Eight” and Ward Eight it has been ever since, a favorite drink in Boston and also in Waterbury when you have charlie mix one up for you.” – 1936 Waterbury Democrat

The oldest recipe for the Ward Eight I can find comes from the 1926 Book “The Cocktail Book A Sideboard Manual for Gentlemen” by L.C. Page. The recipe here is that recipe, and both the Old Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy Cocktail books seem to mirror this recipe. The only difference being the L.C. Page recipe adds soda water and the Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy do not.

What Does The Ward Eight Taste Like?

The Ward Eight from L.C. Page’s book is a fantastic cocktail, and it tastes like a pomegranate soda. It’s a nice balance of sweet and sour with the refreshing effervescent of soda water. The Old Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy recipes do not add soda water, and while their recipes are still good, they don’t quite hit the mark as the L.C. Page recipe does.

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Bourbon Punch – Classic Recipe

Bourbon Punch Cocktail

Bourbon Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

270

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Bourbon Punch Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 4 oz Black Tea

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients.
  • Pour into the serving glass filled with ice. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

I can’t find much of an origin on this one, but it seems most popular in the American south. If you read my main punch description, I describe how punch style cocktails have, for the most part, never worked in commercial settings. Most of these are only made in folks’ homes, so there are many variations and little written history. If you wanted to learn all the variations and try and get to a root, you would need to pop into southern folks’ homes, make it with them and chat them up. The oldest reference to tea and bourbon punch is hot and seems like a hot toddy. This is something I will do more research on in the future; this is a combination of all the best parts of all the different recipes I could find.

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Whiskey Crusta – Original Recipe & History

Whiskey Crusta Cocktail

Whiskey Crusta

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

211

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Whiskey Crusta Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Gum Syrup

  • 1 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 dases Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Moisten a cocktail glass rim with a cut lemon slice and rub the end in granulated sugar to create a sugar crust.
  • Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir for about 10 seconds to dilute and combine the ingredients.
  • Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a whole lemon peel that circles the glass.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of the Crusta Style Cocktail.

First printed in the 1862 Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas, the Brandy Crusta is old as it is delicious. The Crusta is considered one of the oldest fancy sours and is named for its decorative sugar-crusted rim. It was invented in the 1850s by Joseph Santini in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, and was made to try and improve the taste of the standard sour cocktail. You can spot a crusta by its oversized decorative lemon peel that imparts that this is a special elevated sour cocktail.

How Do Crustas Taste Like?

These fantastic cocktails taste light and delicate while not being overly sour or overly sweet. While the standard sour is more flavorful and benefits from sharper, more intense spirits, this one is different. In my experience, a top-shelf spirit works better. This is because you are not overwhelming the base spirit with a whole ounce of sweetener and citrus, and the more subtle finer qualities of a better base spirit can still come through. Make this with the perspective that you are not making a solid, flavorful cocktail but adding subtle flavor and complexity to an already delicious spirit.

Balancing This Delicious and Subtle Cocktail.

There isn’t any single essential ingredient in this cocktail; instead, all the elements come together in the proper balance. But if I tried to narrow it down, I would say the brandy, orange liqueur, and gum syrup are the most essential parts of this cocktail. You want to use a good base spirit for this cocktail as none of the other ingredients are made to mask the flavor of a lower-quality spirit. So whatever the quality of the base spirit will make a meaningful difference in the final product. The orange liqueur matters, too, because cheap orange liqueurs are typically not very good. I love buying on value, but I’ve never found a cheaper orange liqueur that also tasted good, and with how this drink is structured, you will notice a cheap orange liqueur—lastly, the gum syrup. You can use a standard simple syrup if you prefer and what that will change is the cocktail’s texture. Gum Syrup has gum arabic and gives the cocktail a velvety consistency similar to what egg whites provide. A smooth, meringue-y, velvet, dessert-like texture. Standard simple syrup will not add this texture and make for a thinner liquid texture cocktail, but you may prefer that. If you like your sours without egg whites, then opt for using standard simple syrup but if you like sours with egg whites, buy a bottle of gum syrup and give it a go.

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Boston Sour – Trader Vic’s Recipe

Boston Sour

Boston Sour

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Whiskey sour with egg whites.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Egg Whites

  • 2/3 oz lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

Featured Video

What Is The Difference Between The Boston Sour And The Whiskey Sour?

There is debate whether to call this recipe a Whiskey Sour or a Boston Sour. I will go with Boston Sour, and here is why. 1). I can find no cocktail books that list adding egg whites to a whiskey sour till the 1950s (Read the section below for more detailed information about when egg whites started being used in sours). Whiskey sours were traditionally just lemon juice, sugar, and bourbon. Adding egg whites to cocktails was considered girly, and no machismo man would want to be seen ordering a girly whiskey sour. Even if it made them feel super cute. 2). Traditionally cocktails with egg white had fun, unique names to indicate that they were not a standard sour—white lady, pink lady, clover club, rattlesnake, million dollar cocktail, etc. The list goes on and on, but the name was always something other than “base spirit” sour. 3). Egg whites were listed as optional/non-traditional in sours from the 1950s -to the 1960s, and I can’t find a recipe that says explicitly you must egg whites till the 1970s. The 1972 edition of Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide is the oldest use of the name Boston Sour I could find in a publication that does not list egg whites as optional. If it’s in a book older than that, then it’s one I don’t have. I will say, though, I combed through a little over 100 books published between 1880 and 1972, looking for the Boston Sour, the first one I found.

So the TLDR of this is, Whiskey sours are not traditionally made with egg whites, and the Boston Sour is the first version of this recipe I found to say you must use egg whites and that they are not optional.

To Add Egg Whites Or Not To Add Egg Whites

Historically speaking, if a cocktail was a simple sour, it did not have egg whites. Yes, there were cocktails like the clover club or pink lady that had egg whites, or you can go back even further to the Fizz-style cocktails from the 1880s that had egg whites. But not until the early 1950s am I able to find anyone using egg whites in a cocktail labeled a Sour. Sour cocktails before the 1950s that used egg whites in this way all seemed to have fun names and were presented as cocktails for the ladies. In the 1930s or 40s, if a man ordered a whiskey sour and were handed one with egg whites, he would probably be offended or think the bartender mixed his drink up with some women’s at the bar. I looked through maybe 100+ books ranging from the 1880s to the late 1960s, which was pretty consistently what I found.

The earliest use of egg whites in a standard sour I could find was from King Cocktail by Eddie Clark. In 1947 Eddie Clark was the successor head bartender to Harry Craddock at the Savoy. The 1955 official British Bartenders union cocktail book, The UKBG, also mentions using egg whites in sours, but both books say they are optional and not traditional. Assumedly egg whites were added upon request and not the usual way a whiskey sour was made. Keep in mind Harry Craddock, 1920 – the 40s, did not make his sours with egg whites. All those cocktails had different fun names. Eddie Clark even grouped those fun cocktails in his book’s “For ladies only” section.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Fred Collins – Classic Recipe & History

Fred Collins Cocktail

Fred Collins

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

273

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Fred Collins.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 5 oz Sparkling Lemonade

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly add the sparkling lemonade.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Collins Cocktail.

While probably not invented by Harry Johnson, his 1882 Bartenders Manual is the oldest printed book I could find to mention the Collins cocktail. The oldest concrete evidence of this cocktail is the Harry Johnson one. It seems both the John Collins and Tom Collins are invented around the same time, and the Bartenders Manual gives a pretty definitive recipe for both the John and Tom Collins. His John Collins recipe calls for genever (dry gin doesn’t start to get mixed into cocktails till the end of the 1800s/early 1900s), and his recipe for the Tom Collins calls for Old Tom gin. Harry Johnson’s collins recipes and names are clearly defined, but unlike Harry Johnson, Jerry Thomas’s 1887 Bartenders Guide does not follow his recipes. The Bartender’s Guide doesn’t even mention the John Collins but instead uses the name Tom Collins for every variation of the collins. It has three different recipes for Tom Collins. A Tom Collins whiskey, a Tom Collins brandy, and a Tom Collins genever. It doesn’t mention the Tom Collins with Old Tom gin and calls the one made with genever a Tom Collins.

To further complicate this, in 1885, a British cocktail book called “The New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef” by Bacchus and Cordon Bleu has a recipe for what they call a Fred Collins. Their Fred Collins Recipe is a Whiskey Collins with orange liqueur instead of simple syrup. Their Collins section states, “I should be glad if our caterers would agree what it is to be perpetually named. One Barkeeper calls it a John Collins – another Tom Collins. Harry and Fred are all members of the same family.” They then say they prefer the Fred Collins name, thus credence to Jerry Thomas’s version of the Collins in that the name is more a style than a specific drink. Hell, there was a Harry Collins we have never seen. The Savoy Cocktail Book does the same thing and has both a Dry Gin and Whiskey Tom Collins. Although The Savoy does say that a Tom Collins made with genever is instead called a John Collins.

While Harry Johnson uses the names as specific cocktails, the Bartenders guide and others seemed to use the collins as a cocktail structure more than a particular recipe. Like the Rickey, Daisy, or Fizz, the collins describe a structure of 2 parts base spirit, 1 part citrus, 1 part sweetener, and 4 or 5 parts carbonated beverage. Harry Johnson’s influence has been permanent, and the collins is ultimately both. It is a specific cocktail that Harry Johnson pushed and a cocktail archetype like others believed. Looking at its influence as an archetype, many popular cocktails are structurally collins that you would not think of as a Collins. The Adios Motherfucker, Mojito, French 75, Paloma, etc., are just fun variations on the Collins form.

What Does the Fred Collins Taste Like?

This classic British collins is quite lemony since it uses both lemonade and lemon juice, but the addition of orange liqueur balances out the sweet and sour flavors of the drink well. It’s not as refreshing as the other collins cocktails that use soda water to lengthen the drink, but the Fred Collins is very flavorful and one of my favorite versions of Collins.

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Whiskey Nips – Ultimate House Cocktail To End The Day

Whiskey Nips

Whiskey Nips

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Recipe by Robert Kachelriess Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Invented by Las Vegas Lifestyle and craft cocktail writer Robert Kachelriess, The Whiskey Nips is his go to cocktail after a long day at work.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Aperol

  • 1 oz Disaronno

  • 1 oz Bourbon

  • 2 oz Grapefruit La Croix

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients except the Grapefruit Soda water in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Add ice to the glass and strain the drink into glass.
  • Gently pour the grapefruit soda water on top.
  • Give a couple turns to mix and enjoy.

Notes

Featured Video

The Whiskey Nips is the ultimate house cocktail invented by Las Vegas lifestyle and craft cocktail writer Robert Kachelriess. It’s easy to make and just the right balance of sweet and bitter over a strong bourbon base. Pour each shot of alcohol over ice in a rock glass. Top off with club soda (ideally, La Croix grapefruit — or “Pamplemousse” if you’re sophisticated) and stir with a spoon (or steak knife for extra macho factor). No garnish is needed.

Feel free to adjust the levels of alcohol to preferred strength level. Just beware: this drink goes down easy. Almost too easy. Another bonus: The recipe is so simple; it’s easy to describe to any bartender, although La Croix is always preferred to club soda from a gun.

If you enjoy cocktails like the Boulevardier or Japanese Cocktail, this refreshing herbal and almond cocktail is the ultimate cocktail. If you do not have Grapefruit La Croix or any other grapefruit infused soda water, then soda water and grapefruit bitters can be used.

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