Poets Dream – William Tarling’s 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

How Does The Poet’s Dream Taste

The Poet’s Dream taste like a slightly more herbal dry martini. A little less boozy but more complex with small amount of benedictine and orange bitters. My suggestion is to serve this cold as possible, stir maybe a couple seconds more usual and go easy on the orange bitters. A dash too much on the bitters and that becomes the overwhelming flavor. Like the dry martini this is kinda a hard drink to make. Not because it is complex but because it is so subtle and unforgiving if you don’t get it right. This drink can be amazing if done right and the flavors are kept in check when measuring and stirring. But it can also be pungent if you get a little heavy handed on the bitters. It’s easier to start small on this and gauge the taste, adding a little more of the benedictine and bitters as you continue making more.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book

Cafe Royal is absolutely massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not actually create most of the recipes in the Cafe Royal, he was actually the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction he say he comb through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster and sadly normal folks like you and me will probably never own it. sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in it’s single 1937 edition. The book was actually created and sold as a fund raising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sport club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients and positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as being more edgy and experimental in their recipes when compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was known for being an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t really start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s actually easy to argue that the margarita was actually invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the books preface William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night, its monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

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Poets Dream – William Tarling’s 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

115

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Poet’s Dream

Ingredients

  • 1 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 2 dashes Benedictine

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, express an lemon peel over the top,

Notes

Chrysanthemum – Classic 1934 Savoy Cocktail

How Does The Chrysanthemum Taste

From The 1934 Savoy Cocktail Book, The Chrysanthemum is wonderful example of the kind of cocktails being invented in Europe during American Prohibition. Heavier use of European liqueurs and favoring more complex herbal flavors over the more American spirit forward cocktails, the Chrysanthemum is a beautiful, herbal, bright, and both lightly sweet and dry cocktail. If you are looking for something new that will become one of your favorites, then try the Chrysanthemum. This is not an exaggeration. The taste of this cocktail absolutely blew my mind. It’s really that good.

The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London

Opened in 1893 The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American style cocktails in London to the British upperclass. The American Bar has always been a high end bar but what really set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became it’s head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high end hotel bars, but Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the american prohibition was coming to an end the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar and a year later they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934 The Savoy Cocktail Book documents all of the bars best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era, European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there though. A cocktail cost around $250 there and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

The Most Important Ingredient

The most important ingredient in the Chrysanthemum is actually the expressed orange peel garnish. There is only one Benedictine so that easy, and a good dry vermouth is important too, but the subtle flavor the orange oil adds is what makes this an amazing drink. Very rarely is the garnish what makes a drink but with the Chrysanthemum’s case its essential. If you do not have an orange for the peel then orange bitters work well too. I actually think it taste better with a dash of orange bitters instead but an expressed orange peel is traditional.

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Chrysanthemum – Classic 1934 Savoy Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

155

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Chrysanthemum.

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Absinthe

  • 1 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Dry Vermouth

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass.
  • Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink and strain into a glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed orange peel.

Notes

Vieux Carre | Original 1937 Walter Bergeron – New Orleans Recipe

Any cocktail with Peychaud’s Bitters is almost always from New Orleans. The name Le Vieux Carre translates to “The Old Square”, referring to the New Orleans French Quarter. The drink was invented in 1937 by Walter Bergeron who was the head bartender at the Monte Leone Hotel In New Orleans.

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Vieux Carre | Original 1937 Walter Bergeron – New Orleans Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

144

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Vieux Carre.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Peychauds Bitters

  • 1 tsp Benedictine

  • 2/3 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2/3 oz Brandy

  • 2/3 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Kentucky Colonel Cocktail – A Strong Herbal Old Fashioned

History Of The Kentucky Colonel

The earliest publication I can find of this cocktail is from the 1914 book “Drinks” by Jacques Straub, published posthumously by his wife, Marie Straub. In fact, that is the only publication I can find of this cocktail. None of his more famous contemporaries share this recipe and I feel a bit iffy about Straub’s cocktail recipes anyway. There are many famous cocktails included in his book but the recipes are all totally off the mark. None of his recipes for the famous and classic cocktails of his time match what others were publishing. It feels like he copied no one, and no one copied him. While this cocktail is pretty good and one worth saving, I wouldn’t give it much historical weight or authority.

What Does The Kentucky Colonel Taste Like

This is a really pretty cocktail but it is very strong. I’m the only one I know who likes this drink but I also am the only one I know who actually like old, strong, herbal drinks. The best way to think of this as an herbal Old Fashioned.

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Kentucky Colonel Cocktail – A Strong Herbal Old Fashioned

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

199

kcal
ABV

40%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a variation of the Manhattan with an herbal twist.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 1/2 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Singapore Sling – Original 1915 Ngiam Tong Boon Recipe

This cocktail is actually more tiki like than a sling in the traditional manner. The Singapore sling was invented in 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon while working at the Long Bar in the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. Slings started out originally as more of a boozy citrus shooter, and over time they got lengthened and sweeter. This one most likely a tropical variation of the Straits Sling.

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Singapore Sling – Original 1915 Ngiam Tong Boon Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: Singapore
Servings

1

servings
Calories

259

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Singapore Sling.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 4 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grenadine

  • 1/3 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Cherry Liqueur

  • 1/3 oz Benedictine

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Frisco Sour Cocktail – An Herbal Whiskey Sour

Benedictine makes anything taste herbal and this is basically an herbal tasting Whiskey Sour. Despite that description it is actually really good and the Benedictine balances well with the rest of the drink. Don’t buy Benedictine just to try this but if you have some give it a shot.

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Frisco Sour Cocktail – An Herbal Whiskey Sour

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Frisco Sour cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Bobby Burns Cocktail – Original 1934 Savoy Recipe

The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London

Opened in 1893 The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American style cocktails in London to the British upperclass. The American Bar has always been a high end bar but what really set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became it’s head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high end hotel bars, but Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the american prohibition was coming to an end the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar and a year later they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934 The Savoy Cocktail Book documents all of the bars best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era, European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there though. A cocktail cost around $250 there and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Bobby Burn And His Poetry

Bobby Burns was an 18th century Scottish poet and every single English speaker in the world knows his poetry, or at least any one who has celebrated Valentines Day or watched a movie featuring a new years party, even if they don’t know his name. Robert Burns wrote many famous poems and songs but two of them are still commonly used today; Auld Lang Syne and Red, Red, Rose. Sung at the turn of the year, everyone knows the tune to Auld Lange Syne even if they don’t know the words. Written in 18th century scot (which is a mix of modern English and Scottish Gaelic) the poem is bittersweet in its lyrics as it reminisces of the past and the experiences shared between two friends. And Red, Red Rose is just that, everyone knows that. “Oh my love is like a red, red rose, That’s newly sprung in June: Oh my love is like the Melodie, that’s sweetly played in tune.”

What Does The Bobby Burns Taste Like

The Bobby Burns is a pretty wonderful cocktail and taste very similar to a Manhattan but with a slight more herbal flavor. If you like manhattans then this is a must.

The Most Important Ingredient

Like the Manhattan the most important ingredient in the Bobby Burns is the sweet vermouth. The other two ingredients lend their flavors but scotch is kinda scotch, just pick one you like, and Benedictine is Benedictine, there is only that one brand. The sweet vermouth is where you have the most play and most diverse flavors to work with. The sweet vermouth is what really carries this drink and lends the most flavor. It has the most meaningful impact on the cocktail so pick a good one.

Here is the original Scots Auld Lang Syne and an English translation for fun.

Auld Lang Syne (Original Scots)

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp!
And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes
And pu’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary foot
Sin auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl’d i’ the burn,
Frae mornin’ sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right guid willy waught,
For auld lang syne.

Auld Lang Syne (“Days Long Ago” English Translation)

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And days long ago?

For days long ago, my dear,
For days of long ago,
We’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
For the days of long ago.

And surely you’ll have your stein!
And surely I’ll have mine!
And we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
For the days of long ago.

We two have run about the hills,
And picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered many a weary mile,
Since the days long ago.

We two have paddled in the stream,
From morning sun till supper time;
But the broad seas between us have roared
Since the days long ago.

And here’s my hand, my trusty friend!
And give me your hand too!
And we’ll take a good willed drink,
For the days of long ago.

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Bobby Burns Cocktail – Original 1934 Savoy Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

186

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Bobby Burns cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Benedictine

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1.5 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for about 10 seconds. You don’t want to over stir the drink as the cocktail taste better a little warmer and less diluted than normal.
  • Strain into glass and garnish with an expressed lemon peel.

Recipe Video

Notes

Straits Sling Cocktail – Original 1922 Robert Vermeire Recipe

This recipe come from Robert Vermeire and his 1922 book Cocktails and How to Mix Them. Written while he worked at the New York Embassy Club in London, this sling was developed around the same time as the more famous Singapore Sling.

The Straits Sling follows in the traditional Sling style more than the Singapore Sling. Slings were originally small strong drinks one would sling em’ back in the same way folks today shoot back shots. Either way both are great and if you pour this one over crushed ice it’s perfect.

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Straits Sling Cocktail – Original 1922 Robert Vermeire Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

245

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Straits Sling Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Benedictine

  • 2 dashes Aromatic Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 1/2 oz Kirschwasser

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

April Shower Cocktail – Classic Recipe

This is an Old Fashion style drink even though it is unique to the other Old Fashion types I have included. Its still very booze forward but the orange juice cuts the sharpness substantially. Think of this as a very strong Screw Driver.

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April Shower Cocktail – Classic Recipe

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

243

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the April Shower Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1/2 oz

  • Benedictine
  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Honeymoon Cocktail – Hugo Ensslin’s Beautiful 1917 Recipe

Invented by Hugo Ensslin and first written in his 1916 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks, this is an wonderful little drink. you would think with a name like the honeymoon it would have honey in it but it doesn’t. Not much to say about it other than its a pre-prohibition cocktail that uses apple brandy and benedictine together in a very nice way.

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Honeymoon Cocktail – Hugo Ensslin Beautiful 1917 Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

34%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Honeymoon Cocktail from Hugo Ensslin 1917 cocktail boob Recipes for Mixed Drinks.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Apple Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes