Patricia – Make This Wonderful Dry Vermouth Negroni

Patricia
Patricia

This is a dry variation of a Negroni. I like both equally and can’t say the Boulevardier is better or worse than the Patricia. It just depends on your mood.

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Patricia Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

174

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Patricia Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Campari
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Oyster Bay – Make This Classic Pre-Prohibition Cocktail

Oyster Bay
Oyster Bay

This drink is most likely named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, whose home is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During the earlier days of mixing, there was a trend on the east coast to name drinks after regions of New York. If the oyster was a crayon color, one could also say it had an oyster color. Don’t be put off by the strange color of this drink because it’s pretty good.

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Oyster Bay

2 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

194

kcal
ABV

35%

Total time

3

minutes

While not the prettiest cocktail its actually pretty good.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 2 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 tsp Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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Astoria Cocktail | Make One Of Waldorf-Astoria’s Namesake Cocktails

Astoria Cocktail
Astoria Cocktail

The History Of The Original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

The original Waldorf Hotel was opened in 1893 by William Waldorf Astor of New York. Named after the town of Waldorf, Germany, the Astor Families’ ancestral home, the Waldorf was the apex of luxury New York hotels at its opening. A few years later, in 1897, as a bit of humorous rivalry, William’s cousin, John Jacob Astor IV, would open the Astoria Hotel right across the street. John built the Astoria in the same renaissance revival style and even commissioned the same architect, but made sure to make his hotel a little bit bigger than William’s Waldorf Hotel. Named after the town of Astoria, Oregon, The city founded by John Jacob Astor senior in 1811, the Astoria Hotel was an even more beautiful version of the Waldorf. Fun facts: Astoria, Oregon, is the oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains and the location of the film Kindergartner Cop, starring the great Arnold Schwarzenegger. Also, John Jacob Astor IV helped develop early versions of the turbine engine, wrote sci-fi books, and was one of the most famous Americans to perish with the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

The rivalry was short-lived, though, and the two hotels joined together almost immediately, forming the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1897. Opened on the Waldorf side of the hotel, the Waldorf-Astoria bar was one of the top bars in New York, serving wealthy socialites. From 1897 to 1919, the Waldorf-Astoria bar stood as a testament to the pre-prohibition elite bar scene and helped solidify many of the American classics we know today. With the closing of the bar in 1919 and many of the New York elites moving further north, the hotel’s image became dated, and its current structure and location needed to change too. In 1929 the company sold its hotel on 5th and 34th to Empire State Inc. and began constructing the more modern Waldorf-Astoria on Park Avenue. The original hotel was demolished and replaced by the Empire State Building. Hoping to preserve the legacy of the original hotel’s bar, the company’s publicist, Albert Crockett, managed to collect and publish most of the bar’s classic cocktail recipes in part IV section A of “The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.” He added popular present-day (1934) cocktails in Section B but maintained that section A of the book had all the original recipes from the hotel’s old days.

What does the Astoria Taste like?

Like the old-style martini, the Astoria is lightly sweet and herbal with subtle orange oil flavors. It’s a fantastic drink. The sweetness of the Old Tom gin pair perfectly with the dry vermouth (better than dry gin, in my opinion) and does have an old-time feel to it. If you’re looking to taste some history, you should try the Astoria.

Don’t Stir The Astoria Too Much.

The most important part of making the Astoria is not to mix in a mixing glass with ice for too long. Ice-cold cocktails are excellent, but there is a sweet spot of chill and dilution. Ice from a freezer is typically 0°F (-18°C), and a cocktail at this ABV will maybe freeze around -10°F. So it will absorb as much melted water and coldness as you’re willing to stir it for. If it’s too cold and diluted with melted water, it will taste flat, and the intense chill will conceal the full taste from your tongue. Although if it has too little water and is warm, the flavors won’t open up, and it won’t be crisp. It’s about finding balance and the ingredient’s sweet spot for dilution and chill. For a drink like this, try around 10-15 seconds and adjust more or less depending on the taste. The ingredients are pretty straightforward enough to combine, but it’s a matter of how they are connected.

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Astoria Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Astoria Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Old Tom Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for about 10 – 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass and serve neat.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Japalac – Make This Tasty 1930s Classic Cocktail

Japalac Cocktail
Japalac Cocktail

This looks kind of like a little tiny tequila sunrise. It tastes like one, too, but just a little stronger. This drink dates back to the 1930s and is named after a super-strong, quick-dry wood stain brand.

The name seems to be a play on words, combining the racial slur for a Japanese person and the word lacquer because that brand of wood stain was made with Japan lacquer. That’s the old days for you.

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Japalac

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

16%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Japalac cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Bourbon
  • 1/2 oz

  • Grenadine

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass except the grenadine.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into serving glass and gently pour in the grenadine so it settles on the bottom.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Martini (Dry) – Make The Original Old Waldorf-Astoria Recipe

Dry Martini Cocktail
Dry Martini Cocktail

Origin Of The Dry Martini And It’s Earlier Forms.

The oldest printed martini recipe I could find is in the 1888 edition of Harry Johnson’s New and Improved Bartender’s Manual. His original 1882 edition does not provide a recipe for the Martini. The original martini recipe appears between the late 1880s and 1890s and is essentially a pre-prohibition style Manhattan with Old Tom Gin instead of whiskey. Harry Johnson’s recipe is half Old Tom Gin, half sweet vermouth, a dash of orange liqueur, two dashes of Boker’s (cardamom) bitters, and two dashes of gum syrup. If you look at my original pre-prohibition style Manhattan recipe, they are almost the same, save for the Old Tom Gin. But the recipe begins to change over the next decade until it settles on the more generally accepted 2 oz Old Tom, 1 oz sweet vermouth, and a dash of orange bitters with an expressed lemon peel. By 1900 most bartenders are making it this way. Waldorf-Astoria is making it this way (they decide to be edgy and add a Spanish olive to theirs). Even Harry Johnson updated his recipe to this with his updated 1900 edition. In Britain, Harry Johnson’s original 1888 martini recipe lived on as the Martinez, as seen in Farrow & Jacksons’ 1912 Recipes of American Drinks and the 1934 Savoy cocktail book.

Now This is the original martini and the only version of the martini until the 1910s when the dry variation of the martini was invented and became very popular. This original martini becomes known as a sweet martini, and a medium sweet version is also made that combines the two. The dry martini is by far the most popular form of the martini today, and people try to make it as dry/less vermouth as possible. The 1960 official UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guide) even joked about the American trend toward drier and drier martinis. “In America, the trend for the dry martini to become drier has developed almost to a fad, and the quantity of dry gin to dry vermouth varies from 3 to 1 to 6 to 1,” They write this after saying a martini should be 2 to 1.

I use the Waldorf-Astoria recipe for the dry martini because it is the best form of an early dry martini. It was also the first to use a Spanish olive as a garnish, and while there are other dry martinis from around the time they made theirs, this is still the best one. As far as names, I’m using the Savoy Name for this cocktail as I feel Savoy had the most straightforward and understandable names for the three styles of martini.

Should The Martini Be Shaken Or Stirred?

Should you shake or stir a martini? The answer to this question changes depending on the period the martini is from and if they are James Bond fans or not. Since its origin, the martini has been traditionally stirred. All bar books up to the start of prohibition say to go the martini. It was not till the 1920s and 30s that shaking martinis became common. Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” instructs that the dry and sweet martinis should be stirred. In the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, the author notes, “Modern practice prescribes shaking for a dry martini. This, however, weakens the mixture and uses to be discountenanced by barmen who believed in tradition.”. Keep in mind this book was published in 1935, but it was the collection of recipes used by the original Waldorf-Astoria bar from 1897 to 1919 before the start of prohibition. What the author Albert Crockett, who also happened to be the Waldorf-Astoria’s publicist and company historian, is saying is currently in the 1930s, it was customary to shake martinis, but more traditional bartenders will stir. In the Savoy, which was printed in London in 1934, there is no mention of stirring, and they only say to shake the drink. In the 1945 Chicago Bartenders guide, they say to stir too. In the 1954 book “King Cocktail” by Eddie Clark (the man who took over the Savoy after Harry Craddock), he says to stir the martini. Lastly, in the 1967 book “Cocktails and mixed drinks” by Charles Tuck, he oddly gives two recipes for the dry martini printed on different pages, one saying to stir and the other to be shaken. Casino Royale was published in 1953, and it was bond that popularized the idea that martinis should be shaken and not stirred. The first Bond movie Dr. No was released in 1963.

So should it be shaken or stirred? Who the hell knows. From what I can gather, a stirred martini is both more traditional and results in a better cocktail, but shaking martinis started to become the way hunks ordered their martinis beginning in the early 1930s. This is probably why Bond made it a point to tell the bartender he wanted his martini shaken and not stirred. He was aware of both ways to prepare the cocktail, but Bond is a hunk and not some old fuddy-duddy.

Dry Martini Variations.

  • 50×50 Martini: This is equal parts dry vermouth and gin martini.
  • Gibson: A standard dry martini with a pickled pearl onion instead of a Spanish olive.
  • Reverse Martini: 2 oz dry vermouth and 1 oz gin.
  • Dirty Martini: A martini with a bit of olive juice added.
  • Churchill: A martini made without vermouth and chilled by keeping the gin in the freezer, so it’s not watered down. Simply cold gin with an olive.

Should A Martini Be Garnished With A Lemon Peel or a Spanish Olive?

So the answer is… drumroll, please… both! Depending on who you read. The earliest Martini, what we now call the sweet martini, actually had a maraschino cherry. Eventually, by the 1900s, around the time George Kappeler wrote Modern American Drinks, it was common to express a lemon peel over the top and can optionally garnish with a cherry. That was still the sweet martini, though. The Waldorf-Astoria recipe I am using here is for expressing a lemon peel over the top, discarding it, and then garnishing it with a Spanish olive. The Waldorf-Astoria recipe is the oldest use of a Spanish olive I could find. Then from that point on, most books seem to bounce around from saying to use just an expressed lemon peel, just an olive, both, or none. There isn’t any absolute consistency on the matter or one way that is more common than the other. So do whichever you prefer and accept that one answer is not more right than another. Since I am using the Waldorf recipe, I am using both.

How Cold Should A Martini Be?

The most important part of making a dry martini is controlling the coldness of the drink and how diluted it gets when mixing it, which can be controlled by the gin you use. I’m writing this in an ideal situation where there are no variations of how much or how little vermouth people like or if they want it dirty or not, shaken and not stirred, etc. This is just 2 oz dry gin, 1 oz dry vermouth, express lemon peel over the top, and garnish with an olive.

Start with a higher proof gin and mix and chill to a colder temperature. Dry gin will range from 40% ABV to 57% ABV (read my rum 151 description for the history of ABV vs. ABW and how 57% became the British Navy “Proof”). 57% is way too high for a martini, but 50% isn’t. I feel the sweet spot for martinis are ones made with gin between 45 – 50%. I will add that the lower ABV of 45% – 40% are becoming much more popular in the last decade as they are a bit easier to drink. For reference, in the United States, Tangueray is 47%, Beefeater is 44% (it used to be 47%, but their 44% was winning some awards and did very well with studies, so they are currently trying 44%). Aviation is 42%, Botanist is 46%, Hendricks is 41%, Nolet’s is 47%, and Bombay is 47%, and the list goes on and on, but these are some popular ones. What I mean by higher proof gins can be chilled and thus diluted more is as you stir, or shake, the drink with ice, more water will melt as the temperature of the drink decreases. This is a good thing. Alcohol extracts oils and flavors from herbs, and watering it down lets our tongues taste better without being overwhelmed by alcohol. You want to dilute the drink some, but there is a point where you can add too much water, and it becomes lame and flat watery gin. If you are already starting at 40% or 42% ABV, there is only so much diluting and subsequently chilling you can do before the ABV drops low enough to taste watery. But if you are starting at 47% or 50%, you can stir the drink longer, cooling it more and diluting it more before you cross that watery threshold.

To wrap up this long-winded rant. Perhaps you like the flavor of Hendricks and want to make a martini with it. You would probably want to stir it a little less and leave it warmer than you would Botanist or Tangueray. A fun way to experiment with this and taste my point is if you have two different ABV gins, mix a few small samples with varying amounts of water and taste them. The Higher ABVs taste better with more water than the lower ones. I’ll be honest with you I find the dry martini a difficult drink to make right. Not because it is complicated but because it is so subtle and unforgiving.

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Martini (Dry)

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

186

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic dry martini

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, express a lemon peel over the top, and garnish with an Spanish olive

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Clover Club – Make The Classic 1917 Recipe From The Ideal Bartender

Clover Club Cocktail
Clover Club Cocktail

The Clover Club cocktail was the signature cocktail of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel’s Clover Club in Philadelphia. The Clover Club men’s club was in operation from the early 1880s to the beginning of prohibition in 1920. The first printing I was able to find of the Clover Club cocktail is from the 1917 book The Ideal Bartender by Tom Bullock. The recipe in that book is “Fill large bar glass 1/2 full fine Ice. 1/2 pony Raspberry syrup. 1/2 jigger dry gin. 1/2 jigger French vermouth. White of 1 egg. Shake well; strain into a cocktail glass and serve.” That more or less translates to 15mls raspberry, 20mls gin, 20mls vermouth, and 30 mls egg white.

I found online that Dave Wondrich found an older printing of it from the 1909 Drinks – How to mix and serve by Paul Lowe. I did my best to look that one up, but I couldn’t personally find it anywhere. I found a picture of the book’s cover but not the recipe, and copies sell for around 300 clams. So I’m not buying that to verify this short entry.

Like the Rose cocktail, common variations of the Clover Club use grenadine or currant syrup instead of Raspberry, but Raspberry is the preferred choice. No one knows what the original Clover Club’s version of its house drink was. We have a few old, pretty good guesses. The recipe I have listed is my best guess at smashing together some of the old guesses while keeping with how other old drinks similar to the clover club were made. Another common way to make it is with 60 mls gin instead of 30 gin and 30 dry vermouth. As I get older, I’m starting to like dry vermouth more and more and slightly prefer the clover club with both; younger, but when I was, I wouldn’t say I liked dry vermouth and liked the straight gin one better. So really, it’s up to what you prefer or have on hand, but both are good ways to make it.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Clover Club

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Clover Club cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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Brooklyn Cocktail – Make This Delicious Classic Pre-Prohibition Cocktail

Brooklyn Cocktail
Brooklyn Cocktail

As Biggie-Smalls said, “Where Brooklyn At?! Where Brooklyn At?!” If you’re looking for the Brooklyn cocktail, it’s right here, but this drink could easily have been lost and forgotten. Unfortunately, this drink was never as popular as its’ other New York cocktail buddies, the Manhattan or Bronx, and once prohibition came along, history mostly forgot about the Brooklyn.

The main reason people probably stopped making it is one of the main ingredients, Amer Picon, stopped being imported into the United States a long time ago. It is still manufactured but can only be purchased in Europe. Amer Picon is a kind of an herbaly, orangy, bitter/sweetish digestive bitter. I really wanted to include this cocktail so in place of Amer Picon you can try using Amaro Nonino. At about 50 clams a bottle so it’s pretty pricy but at least it can be purchased.

As a side note, if you live outside the USA, then none of this substitution stuff matters, but I think around 80-85% of my users live in the US, so that’s the audience I try to write a bit more to.

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Brooklyn Cocktail

3 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

181

kcal
ABV

35%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Brooklyn Cocktail. An amazing pre-prohibition cocktail that is all but forgotten since the loss of Amer Picon in the United States.

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Amer Picon

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Bronx Cocktail – Make This Amazing Waldorf Astoria Variation

Bronx Cocktail Waldorf Astoria Recipe
Bronx Cocktail Waldorf Astoria Recipe

The History of the Bronx Cocktail.

The Bronx cocktail is named after the famous neighborhood in New York. There are three classic versions of this cocktail. The Oldest version is from William Boothby’s 1908 book “The World’s Drinks and how to mix them.” He credits a man named Billy Malloy of Pittsburg, PA, for inventing the Bronx Cocktail. The second is the Waldorf-Astoria’s recipe (this one), like Boothby’s recipe, just minus the orange juice. The Third is from Hugo Ensslin of the Hotel Wallick, and it is like the Boothby recipe but minus the orange bitters.

The original Boothby recipe is 1 oz each of gin, dry vermouth, sweet vermouth, 1/2 oz of orange juice, and a couple of dashes of orange bitters, but if you look online today, most recipes are the Hugo Ensslin recipe. The Hugo Ensslin recipe turns the cocktail into a medium martini with orange juice, and the Waldorf-Astoria recipe is just a medium martini with a different name. I like this recipe a lot, though, and while all three recipes are good, this one may be more appealing to people who want more potent drinks and enjoy the taste of alcohol more.

The History Of The Original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

The original Waldorf Hotel was opened in 1893 by William Waldorf Astor of New York. Named after the town of Waldorf, Germany, the Astor Families’ ancestral home, the Waldorf was the apex of luxury New York hotels at its opening. A few years later, in 1897, as a bit of humorous rivalry, William’s cousin, John Jacob Astor IV, would open the Astoria Hotel right across the street. John built the Astoria in the same renaissance revival style and even commissioned the same architect, but made sure to make his hotel a little bit bigger than William’s Waldorf Hotel. Named after the town of Astoria, Oregon, The city founded by John Jacob Astor senior in 1811, the Astoria Hotel was an even more beautiful version of the Waldorf. Fun facts: Astoria, Oregon, is the oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains and the location of the film Kindergartner Cop, starring the great Arnold Schwarzenegger. Also, John Jacob Astor IV helped develop early versions of the turbine engine, wrote sci-fi books, and was one of the most famous Americans to perish with the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

The rivalry was short-lived, though, and the two hotels joined together almost immediately, forming the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1897. Opened on the Waldorf side of the hotel, the Waldorf-Astoria bar was one of the top bars in New York, serving wealthy socialites. From 1897 to 1919, the Waldorf-Astoria bar stood as a testament to the pre-prohibition elite bar scene and helped solidify many of the American classics we know today. With the closing of the bar in 1919 and many of the New York elites moving further north, the hotel’s image became dated, and its current structure and location needed to change too. In 1929 the company sold its hotel on 5th and 34th to Empire State Inc. and began constructing the more modern Waldorf-Astoria on Park Avenue. The original hotel was demolished and replaced by the Empire State Building. Hoping to preserve the legacy of the original hotel’s bar, the company’s publicist, Albert Crockett, managed to collect and publish most of the bar’s classic cocktail recipes in part IV section A of “The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.” He added popular present-day (1934) cocktails in Section B but maintained that section A of the book had all the original recipes from the hotel’s old days.

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Bronx Cocktail (Waldorf-Astoria)

2 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

4

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

0

minutes

Learn how to make a Bronx Cocktail. This is the Waldorf Astoria variation of the classic pre-prohibition cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Bitters
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Bombay No.2 Cocktail – Make The Classic 1930 Savoy Recipe

Bombay No.2 Cocktail
Bombay No.2 Cocktail

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

What Does The Bombay No.2 Taste like

The Bombay No.2 is very herbal forward with an oddly orange taste. There is an orange liqueur, but the orange herbal flavor comes from the sweet and dry vermouth. It’s an excellent cocktail with a beautiful fruity herbal taste that is difficult to describe. So why not just make one and try it yourself.

The Most Important Ingredient

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is absolutely the vermouths. It will still be good with cheaper vermouths, but nicer dry and sweet vermouths will take it to another level. The primary flavors in the Bombay No.2 come from those two ingredients, so make them good and add the best flavors you can.

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Bombay #2

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

206

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the amazing Bombay No.2 cocktail from the 1934 Savoy Cocktail book.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash

  • Absinthe
  • 2 dashes

  • Orange Liqueur
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Bronx Cocktail – Make Hugo Ensslin Delicious 1917 Variation

Bronx Cocktail Hugo Ensslin Recipe
Bronx Cocktail Hugo Ensslin Recipe

History of the Bronx Cocktail

The Bronx cocktail is named after the famous neighborhood in New York. There are three classic versions of this cocktail. The Oldest version is from William Boothby’s 1908 book “The World’s Drinks and how to mix them.” He credits a man named Billy Malloy of Pittsburg, PA, for inventing the Bronx Cocktail. The second is the Waldorf-Astoria’s recipe, like Boothby’s recipe, just minus the orange juice. The Third is from Hugo Ensslin (this one) of the Hotel Wallick, and it is like the Boothby recipe but minus the orange bitters.

The original Boothby recipe is 1 oz each of gin, dry vermouth, sweet vermouth, 1/2 oz of orange juice, and a couple of dashes of orange bitters, but if you look online today, the most recipe is this one; The Hugo Ensslin recipe. The Hugo Ensslin recipe turns the cocktail into a medium martini and ups the amount of orange juice. The Waldorf-Astoria recipe is just a medium martini with a different name. This version cuts the more intense herbal flavors of the original and makes the drink a bit more fruity and drinkable.

The Hotel Wallick History

Built in the 1880s as the “Hotel Cadillac” it was eventually sold to the Wallick brothers in 1905. Located on 43rd and Broadway (Times Square), the Hotel Cadillac branded itself as an exciting place for food, drinks, and entertainment. In 1913 the Wallick Brothers changed the name to “Hotel Wallick”, and relaunched the hotel where It became famous for its burlesque and cabaret shows. Unlike other New York hotels with famous bartenders that tended to appeal to older wealthy guest, the Hotel Wallick was a young businessman’s party hotel. It was during this period that many of Hugo’s famous cocktails such as the aviation, honeymoon, and paradise cocktail were invented. In 1919 (beginnings of prohibition) the hotel sold knowing its drunken party business was over and was renamed “The Cadillac” by its new owners. In 1933 prohibition was repealed but the country was already dealing with the Great Depression. While the hotel had managed to survive prohibition it was unable to weather the depression and closed its doors in 1939. The building was demolished in 1940.

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Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Bronx Cocktail (Hugo Ensslin)

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Bronx Cocktail, invented by Hugo Ensslin and printed in the 1917 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.