Green Tea Punch Recipe

Green Tea Punch
Green Tea Punch

A Short History Of Punch

Punches are some of the oldest types of mixed drinks invented out of necessity. Early merchant sailors brought tons of beer with them as they voyaged to distant exotic lands. These voyages, often to India, were long, and beer has a relatively short shelf life. Toward the end of each trip, the booze had long gone unpalatably flat or was completely spoiled (This is how IPAs were invented, too. Adding a lot more hops helped preserve the beer and kept it from tasting flat by the end of the trip). Every culture has its local distilled booze, and in India, it was arrack. Arrack is a little rough, so it was mixed with juices, black tea, and sugar to make it taste better. It was brought back to England and spread to other English colonies.

The earliest records of the punch style of preparing drinks date to the early 1600s. By the mid-1800s, you don’t hear much about punches. That’s not to say these ever really fell out of fashion, but this style doesn’t make sense commercially. Around the mid-1800s, saloons started to get popular, and the recipes and information that started to get recorded were saved are the more profitable commercial style of mixed drinks. Some examples of taverns or restaurants made punches, but the technique is mainly used for residential free for all drinking and not pay per drink businesses. Restaurants don’t want to make a ton and then potentially end the night with leftover stock and then need to dump it. Also, you need a bartender there to track how much people drink; it can’t have free for all and expect to get paid correctly, so it makes more sense to have that individual make drinks as ordered. These are more suited for college parties or house parties, or we just wrote the declaration of independence so let’s get drunk parties. Even though I’ve read a few articles about this becoming vogue in the last decade or so, I’ve only ever seen one bar that had one house punch, but almost every house party or DIY wedding I’ve been to has 2 or 3 different punches on hand.

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Green Tea Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Make this tasty green tea punch.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1.5 oz Green Tea

  • 1/3 oz Peach Brandy

  • 1/2 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Batavia Arrack

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in a large punch bowl or pitcher.
  • Add Ice to chill and pour out individual servings.

Notes

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Planters Punch #3 – Trader Vic’s Delicious 1972 Recipe

Planters Punch 3
Planters Punch 3

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Trader Vic’s 1972 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

I include this one because it’s pretty on point. Like the others, it has a citrus, syrup (including grenadine), and rum. But something Victor Bergeron brought back that most other versions lack, but classic punches have water. Also, in his 1972 book, he has a special section for this cocktail where he includes six different recipes and says there is no such thing as a proper Planter’s punch. He mentions people coming into the bar trying to educate him on what makes an authentic Planter’s Punch. Each one is different, and Vic lays out that there is a Planter’s Punch for every island in the Caribbean.

  • 1/2 oz (15 mLs) Lime Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Dark Simple Syrup
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Soda Water

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

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Planter’s Punch – 1972 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

161

kcal
ABV

13%

Total time

3

minutes

Make Trader Vic’s 1970s Planters Punch

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Dark Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Shake the shaker only a little since soda water will be added.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all.
  • Top off with soda water.
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Dark Simple Syrup – Flavorful Brown Syrup

Dark Simple Syrup
Dark Simple Syrup

What Is The Difference Between Brown Sugar And White Sugar?

So, believe it or not, white sugar is bleached to make it white. Bleaching sugar produces a completely uncolored and clean sweetener that only adds sweetness and no additional flavor. Non-bleached but still refined sugar will always have a little molasses left behind. Molasses can only be wholly removed chemically. Regardless most manufactured sugar is bleached. To produce brown sugar, many companies will mix a little extracted molasses back into the bleached refined sugar. Natural, non bleached brown sugars are: turbinado sugar, demerara sugar, muscovado sugar, and piloncillo sugar. These sugars vary in how refined the molasses content is. These will make a simple dark syrup with a similar enough taste. Sure there will be some differences, but if you can’t find piloncillo or demerara, then turbinado or regular brown sugar will do.

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Dark Simple Syrup

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

8

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

A simple brown simple syrup for drinks.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Brown, demerara, or other non-bleached sugar

  • 11 oz Water

  • Optional Ingredient
  • 1/4 tsp Cream of TarTar (Tartaric Acid)

Directions

  • Combine the sugar and water in a heat proof container and microwave on high for 30 seconds or heat on the stove. Stir to combine
  • While still warm add the cream of tartar and stir to combine.
  • Once the syrup has cooled bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.
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Cocktails That Use Brown Simple Syrup

Hot Ale Flip – Colonial Recipe & History

Hot Ale Flip
Hot Ale Flip

A Short History Of Cooking Beer.

Before the days of bottling and refrigeration, fresh beer had a minimal shelf life, and having to waste any brought a tear to many people’s eyes. So like any food item on its way out, people tried to find ways to get just a couple more uses out of it. I’m sure you do this all the time. Strawberries are starting to get soft. Make a smoothie. Worried about your gigantic bag of onions getting too old, make French onion soup. There are many things you can do before food turns and during the 17th century cooking beer with honey and spices was one way to mask the flavor of a beer going bad.

Earlier forms of the hot ale flip we simple hot ale and honey drinks, and if you want to find these recipes, you’ll need to look in old cookbooks. One such recipe from the 1669 book “The Closet” by Sir Kenelme Digbie is an ale recipe with honey specifically for beer that is about to go wrong. Sir Kenelme Digbie described cooking old beer with honey would help the turned old beer and “set the whole a working a fresh, and casting out foulness.”

Some very old books had tips and tricks for the old food, but with the invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid-1800s, that stopped being such a big problem. Most of those recipes either got lost to time, but many still live on as things you usually eat—fruit pies, jellies, alcohol, pickles, hell, even banana bread. Hence, most recipes specifically call for nasty old soft brown bananas no one wants to eat. It’s for flavor, but it comes from a much older tradition. Old meat was a little harder to repurpose and was something you needed to persevere before it started to turn. Although old meat could be used as bait to catch fresh meat or go fishing, once meat goes bad, it needs to be discarded.

What Does The Hot Ale Flip Taste Like?

Check out my article here, where I have taste-tested many different beers to see which make the best flips. Depending on the beer you use, these can be good or bad. To make it more difficult, it’s almost impossible to know which beers are suitable as a flip and which are not without actually trying them. You think a dark flavorful beer would be tasty warmed with spices, whiskey, and sugar, but most are awful. The flavorful beers seem to turn too bitter, but lighter, more drinkable beers like Boston lager and Budweiser are excellent. The only way to know is to try. I started doing a whole YouTube series on which beers taste good and which taste bad, and my goal is to try every beer I can get my hands on hot. I have a hot beer tier list of my favorite beers so far. I like fat tire, to begin with, but hot it was amazing.

Keep in mind that this is a way of making old beers taste good again. I opened a bottle of beer, poured it, set it on the counter for a day, and it made a better flip than a fresh bottle of the same beer. The new beer tastes better cold, but the old beer tastes better flipped. My mind was blown. No of these results were expected. I believed the opposite to be true of what the actual results were. I only tried it with this one beer (Boston lager since I liked it flipped, to begin with), but I feel I should do the same experiment for others. Doing this will likely make me gain quite a few pounds in the next year, but I think it will be fun.

What Is A Flip?

No one knows where the term flip came from. Some guesses are that it described the bubbles leaving the drink. Like the bubbles flipped from the inside to the outside, or the drink was so strong it would make you flip out of your chair. No one knows, but I have my idea. Some 18th century and earlier books provided ways to repurpose food that was going bad or losing its freshness. I wrote a bit about that in the paragraphs above. It is often referred to as the food or drinks turning. My guess is the term flip was a clever play on words to describe making a turned beer taste good again. Again I have no evidence of this. It’s just a feeling.

I will be using a traditional toddy rod or, as it is also called, a loggerhead to warm the Flip. A stove works too, but a toddy rod imparts a slightly toastier final flavor. If you are curious to learn more, check out this fantastic article on early American toddy culture.

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Hot Ale Flip

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

330

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a hot ale flip.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Dark Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 12 oz Amber Ale

  • Light dusting Nutmeg

Directions

  • Add rum and simple syrup to a large beer glass.
  • Stir rum and syrup together and next add beer.
  • Dip a hot toddy rod into the drink and stir with the rod as the drink boils.
  • Garnish with a dusting of nutmeg.

Notes

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Mexican Coffee – Amazing Tequila Cocktail

Mexican Coffee Cocktail
Mexican Coffee Cocktail

I’m going to say something that might piss off many people, but this is way better than an Irish coffee. Don’t get me wrong, the original Irish coffee is excellent, but the flavors and spices in this make it a winner. Replacing the Irish whiskey with tequila makes this taste quite a bit different.

NOTE: I have simple syrup listed here, but use piloncillo if you want to make this right. Piloncillo is a Mexican unrefined cone block of sugar with a ton of flavor. (As an aside, brown sugar is close but not the same. Brown sugar is regular old white sugar with molasses added back in.) Piloncillo is natural, unrefined, delicious brown sugar, and it costs almost nothing. If there isn’t a Mexican market where you live, I’m sure you can order it online. Sprinkle a little cinnamon on top, and you have just made a coffee that no coffee house can match. Unless they also make Mexican coffee. Then yes, in those cases, they can match it.

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Mexican Coffee

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

314

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Mexican Coffee.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Piloncillo Syrup

  • 2 oz Mezcal

  • 5 oz Coffee

  • 1 oz Heavy Cream

Directions

  • Simply combine the ingredients in warm glass except the heavy cream.
  • Add heavy cream to shaker and shake for around 1 minute to thicken into whipped cream.
  • Float cream on top.

Notes

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Philadelphia Fish House Punch – Colonial American Recipe

Philadelphia Fish House Punch
Philadelphia Fish House Punch

The Angling Club That Helped Found America.

The iconic Philadelphia Fish house punch is believed to have come from the oldest angling club in the United States named the “Colony in Schuylkill.” Initially located in Fairmount, Pennsylvania, the club opened a clubhouse at the foot of the Schuylkill River Falls (The Club eventually changed its name to the Schuylkill Fishing Company and has moved several times since its founding and is now located in Andalusia, Pennsylvania). Playing a pivotal role in the revolutionary war, the governing members of the Colony of Schuylkill helped form the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry. The First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry is still the oldest active and most decorated unit in the US Army today. George Washington & the Marquis de Lafayette often stopped at the clubhouse during the war, where they became honorary members. The Club would hold gatherings for military victories and, to celebrate, would mix up a special punch it served from their baptism bowl. These celebrations are the birthplace of the Philadelphia Fish House Punch.

The famed fish house punch did not stay in the clubhouse long and quickly became a well-known American punch. The oldest printed recipe for this cocktail is in the 1862 Bartender’s Guide by Jerry Thomas.

  • 1/3 Pint of lemon juice
  • 3/4 pound of white sugar
  • 1/3 pint of peach brandy
  • 1/3 pint of cognac brandy
  • 1/3 pint of Jamaican rum
  • 2 1/2 pints of cold water

Here is the punch recipe updated to use more convenient units. The single-serve recipe is below.

  • 3/4 cup of lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 cups (1/2 bottle) of simple syrup
  • 3/4 cup of peach brandy
  • 3/4 cup of cognac brandy
  • 3/4 cup of Jamaican rum
  • 6 1/3 cups (2 bottles) of cold water

A pint is the equivalent volume of a pound of water, so it’s good enough to use pound and pint interchangeably. Even the Mount Vernon historical estate recognizes this as the correct recipe, and I’m confident they know what they are talking about. But not all recipes use water. Some use black tea. The black tea tastes better and adds a nice earthiness to it, but water is the original ingredient.

Peach Liqueur Is Not Peach Brandy.

Another ingredient that can cause an issue is peach brandy. Brandy is a catch-all name for any spirit distilled from fruit. However, the word brandy is synonymous with specifically grape brandy distilled from grape wine; any fruit wine can be distilled into brandy. To differentiate the other fruits, it specified which fruit, so apple brandy is from apple wine or pear brandy from pear wine, peach from peach wine, etc. And these other fruit brandies are typically dry, 80-proof, un-aged spirits.

The problem is peach liqueurs, and peach schnapps will be marketed and sold as peach brandy when they are entirely different from real peach brandy. Again real peach brandy is dry and strong, almost like a peachy white rum. Real peach brandy is nearly impossible to find, making the issue worse in stores. I’ve only ever seen dry peach brandy as small craft distilleries in house stores. Christian Bros Peach Brandy is the closest I’ve found in most liquor stores. It’s pretty good. It’s brandy infused with peach flavors, but it’s pretty dry, 35% ABV, and the closest you will get taste-wise to an absolute peach brandy. That being said I really like this made with peach schnapps.

Recipe Resources

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Philadelphia Fish House Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a single serving of the iconic Philadelphia Fish House Punch.

Ingredients

  • 4 oz Water

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Peach Brandy

  • 1/2 oz Gold Rum

  • 1/2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in a large punch bowl or pitcher.
  • Add Ice to chill and pour out individual servings.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.