Clamacheve – Michelada With Clamato Recipe

Michelada
Michelada

History Of The Michelada.

It would be hard to pin down a single origin to the michelada and most likely there isn’t one. Doing a search of digitally archived newspapers, magazines, and books the earliest printed reference I can find to the michelada is in the early 1990s. In a 1992 Mexican book, “Cafión Castro, detective tropical y otras crónicas” by dámaso Murúa, the author mentions the main character stopping to get a michelada and in parenthesis explains it’s a beer with lime and salt. Which tells us the michelada existed but was obscure enough that it needed to be explained. In a 1998 mexican travel guide “Mexico – Traveler’s Companion” by Maribeth Mellin, the author explains that for ordering authentic local drinks “The latest beer concoction is the michelada , served in an icy mug with an inch or so of lime juice in the bottom , salt around the rim and ice”. She also points out that some regions add Maggi sauce to their micheladas and call michelada’s without Maggi sauce just cheladas. I found a few other examples that mirror this information but you get the idea.

The impression i get from these publications from the 1990s is the earliest form of the michelada was just lime juice and salt and the different recipes are regional. Micheladas made with Maggi Sauce, Clamato, or just lime and salt are all equally authentic and most likely developed simultaneously in different regions. So make the Michelada the way you like and flavor it as you feel fit.

These days the Michelada made with only lime juice and salt is usually referred to as a Chelada instead of a michelada. The modern naming of these drinks is a bit clearer than the older way as it helps distinguish between the variations. The Chelada is the lime juice and salt version, the michelada is the savory one with Maggi sauce or soy sauce, and the clamacheve is a michelada with clamato. Where I live, a clamacheva is the default michelada recipe, and nine times out of 10, this is what you will get when you order a michelada.

What Does The Clamacheve Taste Like?

The Clamacheve is a fantastic drink; it tastes like a beer mixed with a Bloody Mary. The funky tomato juice with spices and salts mixes very well with the malty refreshing taste of a beer. The times I have traveled somewhere where they are unfamiliar with this drink, I will order a bloody mary and a beer and mix the two at the table. The other tables look at me like I’m crazy but taste like a michelada with clamato. If you like bloody marys, then you would like this.

The best advice I can give on making a good Clamacheve or Michelada is not to be afraid to load it up with spices and lime. I am not Mexican, so when I consulted my born and raised in Mexico friends on how to make these, they would tell me to add a little lime juice, a little this, a little that, etc. My idea of a little was very different from their idea of a little, and once I learned that my micheladas started to taste good. So add a good amount of spices, and don’t be afraid that you may have added too much. It might be the right amount.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Clamacheve

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

127

kcal
ABV

4%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Clamacheve.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 tsp Salt

  • 1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce

  • 1 tsp Hot Sauce

  • 2 oz Clamato

  • 12 oz Pale Ale or Lager

Directions

  • Combine all the ingredients except for the beer in a pint glass and mix to combine.
  • Pour in beer and enjoy.
Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Chelada – Recipe & History

Chelada
Chelada

History Of The Michelada And The Chelada.

It would be hard to pin down a single origin to the michelada and most likely there isn’t one. Doing a search of digitally archived newspapers, magazines, and books the earliest printed reference I can find to the michelada is in the early 1990s. In a 1992 Mexican book, “Cafión Castro, detective tropical y otras crónicas” by dámaso Murúa, the author mentions the main character stopping to get a michelada and in parenthesis explains it’s a beer with lime and salt. Which tells us the michelada existed but was obscure enough that it needed to be explained. In a 1998 mexican travel guide “Mexico – Traveler’s Companion” by Maribeth Mellin, the author explains that for ordering authentic local drinks “The latest beer concoction is the michelada , served in an icy mug with an inch or so of lime juice in the bottom , salt around the rim and ice”. She also points out that some regions add Maggi sauce to their micheladas and call michelada’s without Maggi sauce just cheladas. I found a few other examples that mirror this information but you get the idea.

The impression i get from these publications from the 1990s is the earliest form of the michelada was just lime juice and salt and the different recipes are regional. Micheladas made with Maggi Sauce, Clamato, or just lime and salt are all equally authentic and most likely developed simultaneously in different regions. So make the Michelada the way you like and flavor it as you feel fit.

These days the Michelada made with only lime juice and salt is usually referred to as a Chelada instead of a michelada. The modern naming of these drinks is a bit clearer than the older way as it helps distinguish between the variations. The Chelada is the lime juice and salt version, the michelada is the savory one with Maggi sauce or soy sauce, and the clamacheve is a michelada with clamato. Where I live, a clamacheva is the default michelada recipe, and nine times out of 10, this is what you will get when you order a michelada.

What Does A Chelada Taste Like?

The Chelada is fantastic, and the lime juice and salt mix beautifully with beer. The lime’s acid and freshness perfectly cut the beer’s malty flavor. It’s a great beach drink and a great beer to enjoy after a day of hard work outside.

The best advice I can give on making a good Chelada or Michelada is not to be afraid to load it up with spices and lime. I am not Mexican, so when I consulted my born and raised in Mexico friends on how to make these, they would tell me to add a little lime juice, a little this, a little that, etc. My idea of a little was very different from their idea of a little, and once I learned that my micheladas started to taste good. So add a good amount of spices, and don’t be afraid that you may have added too much. It might be the right amount.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Chelada

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

111

kcal
ABV

4%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Chelada.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 tsp Salt

  • 12 oz Pale Ale or Lager

Directions

  • Combine all the ingredients except for the beer in a pint glass and mix to combine.
  • Pour in beer and enjoy
Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Buttered Beer No.2 – Modern Recipe

Buttered Beer #2
Buttered Beer #2

A Short History Of Cooked Beer Cocktails.

Before the days of bottling and refrigeration, fresh beer had a very limited shelf life, and having to waste any brought a tear to many people’s eyes. So like any food item on its way out, people tried to find ways to get just a couple more uses out of it. I’m sure you do this all the time. Strawberries are starting to get soft; make a smoothie. Worried about your gigantic bag of onions getting too old, make French onion soup. There are many things you can do before food turns and during the 17th century cooking beer with honey and spices was one way to mask the flavor of a beer going bad.

Earlier forms of the hot ale flip we simple hot ale and honey drinks, and if you want to find these recipes, you’ll need to look in old cookbooks. One such recipe from the 1669 book “The Closet” by Sir Kenelme Digbie is an ale with a honey recipe specifically for beer that is about to go bad. Sir Kenelme Digbie described cooking old beer with honey would help the turned old beer and “set the whole a working a fresh, and casting out foulness.”

Some very old books had tips and tricks for the old food, but with the invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid-1800s, that stopped being such a big problem. Most of those recipes either got lost to time, but many still live on as things you usually eat—fruit pies, jellies, alcohol, pickles, hell, even banana bread. Hence, most recipes specifically call for nasty old soft brown bananas no one wants to eat. It’s for flavor, but it comes from a much older tradition. Old meat was a little harder to repurpose and was something you needed to persevere before it started to turn. Although old meat could be used as bait to catch fresh meat or go fishing, it must be disposed of once food goes truly bad.

The Right Beer Makes All The Difference.

Not all beer heat up well. Some taste amazing, and some are awful. As mentioned above, cooked beer cocktails like this were usually done to beers that started to turn and lose flavor. So any flavor improvement was an improvement over drinking old beer, but this gives us some interesting insights into which beers heat up best. Generally speaking, I have found that milder and less flavorful beers taste better hot than more robust, darker beers. Check out my article here, where I have taste-tested many different beers to see which make the best flips. What I have noticed is heating a beer up intensifies its flavors. So a beer that is already very flavorful and strong is amplified and becomes completely undrinkable, while a more mild and light beer opens up beautifully. So it makes sense that older beers that had lost some of their flavors made delicious warmed beer cocktails in the past.

Spiced Butter Batter Recipe.

  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Clove
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Allspice (or 1/2 tbs: Allspice dram)
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) Vanilla extract 
  • 1/2 cup (120 g) Brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120 g) Unsalted butter
  1. On very low heat or using a double boiler, just melt the butter and then turn off the heat. Don’t cook and separate the butter. Just melt it.
  2. Next, add all the other ingredients to the melted butter.
  3. Stir till the brown sugar has thoroughly mixed in. Cover spiced butter batter and refrigerate.

This recipe will make about a cup (240 grams) of spiced butter batter mix, about 12 drinks. This is good on biscuits, too, and my kids love this spread on toast.

The Authenticity Of This Recipe.

This is not the classic 1594 buttered beer recipe (That recipe is right here). This is my take on a buttered beer. I wanted to make this a hot buttered beer version of an 18th-century Hot Buttered Rum style. I changed the butter part to use the hot buttered rum’s spiced butter batter instead of the butter and individual spices. I also fortified the beer with a single ounce of rum to add a little strength and extra flavor to the cocktail. I took a hot buttered rum and replaced the hot water with warm beer.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Buttered Beer (Modern Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

318

kcal
ABV

7%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a fantastic contemporary buttered beer

Ingredients

Directions

  • In a saucepan over low heat, combine all the ingredients except for the rum.
  • As the buttered beer heats, gently whisk to mix the beer and butter batter.
  • Turn off the heat once the beer is lightly warmed. Simply warm the beer. Do not make it hot.
  • Pour into a pint glass, add the rum, and serve.
Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Buttered Beer – Original Recipe & History

Buttered Beer
Buttered Beer

A Short History of Cooked Beer Cocktails.

Before the days of bottling and refrigeration, fresh beer had a very limited shelf life, and having to waste any brought a tear to many people’s eyes. So like any food item on its way out, people tried to find ways to get just a couple more uses out of it. I’m sure you do this all the time. Strawberries are starting to get soft; make a smoothie. Worried about your gigantic bag of onions getting too old, make French onion soup. There are many things you can do before food turns and during the 17th century cooking beer with honey and spices was one way to mask the flavor of a beer going bad.

Earlier forms of the hot ale flip we simple hot ale and honey drinks, and if you want to find these recipes, you’ll need to look in old cookbooks. One such recipe from the 1669 book “The Closet” by Sir Kenelme Digbie is an ale with a honey recipe specifically for beer that is about to go bad. Sir Kenelme Digbie described cooking old beer with honey would help the turned old beer and “set the whole a working a fresh, and casting out foulness.”

Some very old books had tips and tricks for the old food, but with the invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid-1800s, that stopped being such a big problem. Most of those recipes either got lost to time, but many still live on as things you usually eat—fruit pies, jellies, alcohol, pickles, hell, even banana bread. Hence, most recipes specifically call for nasty old soft brown bananas no one wants to eat. It’s for flavor, but it comes from a much older tradition. Old meat was a little harder to repurpose and was something you needed to persevere before it started to turn. Although old meat could be used as bait to catch fresh meat or go fishing, it needs to be disposed of once food goes bad.

This Is The Oldest Known Buttered Beer Recipe.

The oldest known (and the only) buttered beer recipe is from the 1594 book “The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin” by Thomas Dawson. The recipe in the book is:

“Take three pintes of Beere, put fiue yolkes of Egges to it, straine them together, and set it in a pewter pot to the fyre, and put to it halfe a pound of Sugar, one penniworth of Nutmegs beaten, one penniworth of Cloues beaten, and a halfepenniworth of Ginger beaten, and when it is all in, take another pewter pot and brewe them together, and set it to the fire againe, and when it is readie to boyle, take it from the fire, and put a dish of sweet butter into it, and brewe them together out of one pot into an other.”

There are not any other buttered beer recipes after this one till J.K Rowling mentions them in her Harry Potter Book Series. One typically sees the Harry Potter versions today are usually cold butterscotch sodas and not a cooked beer cocktail.

The Right Beer Makes All The Difference.

Not all beer heat up well. Some taste amazing, and some are awful. As mentioned above, cooked beer cocktails like this were usually done to beers that started to turn and lose flavor. So any flavor improvement was an improvement over drinking old beer, but this gives us some interesting insights into which beers heat up best. Generally speaking, I have found that milder and less flavorful beers taste better hot than more robust, darker beers. Check out my article where I have taste-tested many different beers to see which make the best flips. What I have noticed is heating a beer up intensifies its flavors. So a beer that is already very flavorful and strong is amplified and becomes completely undrinkable, while a more mild and light beer opens up beautifully. So it makes sense that older beers that had lost some of their flavors made good warmed beer cocktails in the past.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Buttered Beer (1594 Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

420

kcal
ABV

4%

Total time

3

minutes

Make the original Buttered Beer from 1594

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Beer

  • 1 whole Egg Yolk

  • 2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 pinch Nutmeg

  • 1 pinch Cloves

  • 1 pinch Ginger

  • 1 tbsp Unsalted Butter

Directions

  • With the fire off, In a saucepan, combine all the ingredients except for the beer.
  • Whisk the ingredients together. Once combined add the beer and turn on the flame.
  • As the buttered beer heats, constantly whisk to prevent the yolk proteins from bonding together.
  • Turn off the heat once the beer is lightly warmed. Simply warm the beer. Do not make it hot.
  • Pour into a pint glass and serve.
Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Black & Tan – Original Recipe And History

Black And Tan
Black And Tan

The Oldest Known Recipe I Could Find.

Believe it or not, this is a pretty old drink. The oldest recipe for it I could find is from the 1891 book “American Bar-Tender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. He gives three names for the same drink. He calls it a “Half and Half,” an “Arf an Arf,” and a “Black and Tan,” and all three are just half porter and half ale. He doesn’t specify exactly what kinds of ale or porter to use except for just ale and porter.

How to Layer Beer Step One: Gravity.

Layering is achieved by stacking different fluids based on gravity, from heaviest to lightest in order. By “gravity,” we mean the average atomic density of all the dissolved material and its molecules. Alcohol density is 789 kg/m³, water is 978 kg/m³, and sugar is 1586 kg/m³. The average gravity of an alcoholic drink is calculated based on the amount of these three combined items. As you can see, sugar is significantly the heaviest, water is in the middle, and alcohol is slightly lighter than water. So low sugar and high ABV spirits will have lower gravity than high sugar and low ABV liqueurs and thus will float on top.

Every different beer has a different gravity since they have different alcohol, water, and sugar combinations. So the trick is to either google each specific beer’s final gravity or experiment and physically try laying two beers. Thus not all Black and Tan are black on top and tan on the bottom. That all depends on the specific gravity of each beer (generally, there is a range for each type). Most pale ales are heavier than a porter like Guinness, but styles like IPA are often lighter than Guinness, which would result in a Black and Tan with the black on the bottom and the tan on top. To give a quick example, the gravity of Guinness is 1006 kg/m³, and the gravity of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is 1.011 kg/m³; thus, the pale ale will sit at the bottom and the Guinness will float on top. Hell, even bud light is heavier than Guinness, but a beer like Asahi Super Dry has a final gravity of 1.005 kg/m³ so that it would sit on top (but barely). In my experience, though, Guinness is oddly lighter than anything else out there, and it’s the rare occurrence that any pale or brown ale is lighter than it, so it is usually safe just always to put Guinness on top.

Here is a handy chart on brewersfriend.com with the general range of gravities for each style of beer.

How to Layer Beer Step Two: Pouring.

Once you know the order, the next thing is the pour. Pour the first layer normal. I pour the first layer a little harder to try and agitate out some of the bubbles. Even though the first layer is heavier, the rising bubbles will force a bit of mixing and make the divide between the two beers less sharp. Once the bubbles of the first layer settle a bit, slowly pour over a bent spoon the second layer. This helps prevent the two layers from mixing and provides an excellent clean division.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Black & Tan (1891 Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

208

kcal
ABV

6%

Total time

3

minutes

See how to make a Black and Tan beer cocktail

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Pale Ale

  • 8 oz Porter (Guinness)

Directions

  • Pour pale ale halfway up a pint glass.
  • Once bubbles settle, slowly pour the porter beer over a bent spoon to finish filling the glass.
Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.