Cherry Syrup – Old Fashioned Recipe

cherry syrup

Cherry Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

20

servings
Calories

80

kcal
Total time

15

minutes

Learn how to make a nice cherry syrup.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Tart Cherry Juice

  • 2 cups Granulated Sugar

  • 1 tsp Bitter Almond Extract

  • Optional Ingredients
  • 1/4 tsp Citric Acid (Flavor Enhancer)

  • 3 g Lecithin Powder (Foaming Agent)

Directions

  • Add cherry juice to a stovetop pot and bring to a light simmer. Add the sugar and stir till dissolved.
  • Let the syrup simmer for a few minutes till the mixture thickens a bit and the bubbles simmering to the top hold for a little bit. This lets you know the syrup has thickened.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the citric acid.
  • Once the syrup has cooled moisten the lecithin powder with an ounce of water. Once the lecithin is fully dissolved, stir in the lecithin and bitter almond extract.
  • Store in the refrigerator or freeze for storage.

Featured Video

Home Made Cherry Syrup

Home-made cherry syrup is miles better than anything sold in stores and does not require much effort. Making cherry syrup with sweet cherry juice is fine, but for the best results, use tart or sour cherry juice. These cherry juices have a fantastic flavor, and the sour taste is balanced well with the high amount of added sugar.

Making Fruit Syrups With Real Fruit Juices

It’s not always possible to make fruit syrup with actual fruit juice, but the ones made with real juice are much better. Many mass-produced syrups are simple syrups flavored with a combination of esters, essential oils, and extracts. Esters are acid and alcohol combinations whose byproducts taste like fruit to humans. For example, ethanol and butanoic acid bond into ethyl butanoate, which tastes like pineapples. Naturally occurring esters in beer production produce its characteristic fruit flavors. When esters are used to flavor foods, they are listed as artificial flavors. Flavors made from essential oils and extracts are listed as natural flavors. For example, those bright red, clear cherry syrups at stores are just simple syrup with bitter almond, cherry stone extract, and red food dye. No juice at all.

This isn’t a bad thing. Essential oils have a fantastic flavor and is the preferred method for making herb and spice flavored syrups; some prefer artificial ester flavors to real ones. I LOVE artificial grape flavor, which is methyl anthranilate. But these tend to be one-dimensional flavors, making them easy to recognize as unnatural. Real fruit juice has a complex flavor: water-soluble flavors, metals, salts, bitter flavors, acids, carbohydrates, etc. A syrup made with a combination of real fruit juice, essential oils, and extracts will have a rich, complex flavor that no average store-bought syrup can match. For the curious, cherry ester is Isobutyl acetate.

When To Add Citric Acid To A Syrup.

Adding a small amount of citric acid will significantly enhance the flavor of your fruit-based syrups and make their flavor pop even when diluted. Here is a quick explanation of balancing flavors.

Traditional flavor structure is broken into four groups (ignoring umami as it’s not applicable here). The four groups are salty, sour, sweet, and bitter. And it is the interplay of these four groups that create a flavor profile. Flavor profiles can be balanced or unbalanced. Being unbalanced is not a bad thing. It’s just a choice, like adding a salted rim to a margarita or sweet and sour sauce, but a balanced profile is usually the goal. Salty, sour, and sweet all counter each other in a flavor triangle, with bitter being the odd one out as only sweet balances it. Now back to adding acids to syrups.

In the case of cherry syrup, a little citric acid balances the sweetness and makes for a more noticeable cherry flavor. if the only flavor is sweet then it overwhelms the taste buds and inhibits your ability to taste the cherry. A little acid will cut through the sweetness and activate additional taste buds, resulting in a more complete tasting experience. granted the tart cherries are already sour but so much sugar is added and the syrup is reduced enough that a little additional citric acid helps.

When To Add A Foaming Agent To Syrups.

Realistically all syrups should have a foaming agent. There are many drinks that should be cold, still, and foamless, but that can be controlled by how the drink is mixed. It was typical for high-end sodas in the late 1800s to have a nice foam on top. Similar to high-end molecular gastronomy restaurants today, a nice soda fountain would ensure that some drinks had an air or foam on top as you sipped your drink. The foam provides both a creamy texture and olfactory stimulation. These were called foaming agents, and in the 1800s, soap bark or other extracts were added to syrups to provide foam when shaken and mixed with soda water. A popular one today in the United States is propylene glycol, and while it is “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) in the US, it is banned for consumption in the EU. Another modern alternative, and the one I use, is adding lecithin to my syrups. Lecithin is flavor neutral, a natural emulsifier that provides a nice foam, and is often taken as a health supplement. It is also the foaming agent many high-end restaurants use to make foams for food. So I’ll add 0.5% of the total syrups weight of lecithin powder to my syrups as a foaming agent.

Again many drinks contain syrup that should be foamless, like a mint julep, an old-fashioned sazerac, etc., but that can be controlled by stirring the drink instead of shaking it.

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Cherry Lime Soda – Recipe

Cherry Lime Soda

Cherry Lime Soda

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

120

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

Make an old fashion cherry lime soda

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Cherry Syrup

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 8 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine the syrup and juice in a cocktail shaker with one ice cube and shake until you hear that the ice cube have fully melted.
  • Pour the chilled and aerated syrup into a glass.
  • Slowly pour the soda water straight down into the top of the drink. This will build both body and a foam head.

Featured Video

What Does Cherry Lime Soda Taste Like?

Cherry and Lime are two flavors that go very well together, and a cherry lime soda makes for a fantastic drink. Using a tart cherry syrup, like I provide a recipe for, gives a complex and deep cherry flavor that is enhanced by the tartness of lime juice.

How To Get A Nice Foam On Your Sodas.

It was typical for high-end sodas in the late 1800s to have a nice foam on top. Similar to high-end molecular gastronomy restaurants today, a nice soda fountain would ensure that some drinks had an air or foam on top as you sipped your drink. The foam provides both a creamy texture and olfactory stimulation. These were called foaming agents, and in the 1800s, soap bark or other extracts were added to syrups to provide foam when shaken and mixed with soda water. A popular one today in the United States is propylene glycol, and while it is “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) in the US, it is banned for consumption in the EU. Another modern alternative, and the one I use, is adding lecithin to my syrups. Lecithin is flavor neutral, a natural emulsifier that provides a nice foam, and is often taken as a health supplement. It is also the foaming agent many high-end restaurants use to make foams for food. So I’ll add 0.5% of the total syrups weight of lecithin powder to my syrups as a foaming agent. Check out my cherry syrup recipe for exactly how that is done.

If you want to learn more about this topic and make your drinks better, check out De Forest Saxe’s 1894 book “Saxe’s New Guide Hints to Soda Water Dispensers. Another book I highly recommend reading is Darcy S. O’Neil’s absolutely fascinating book Fix The Pumps, which covers the history and standard practices of early soda fountains.

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Orgeat Soda (Almond Soda) – Recipe

orzata

Orgeat Soda

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

100

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an Old Fashion Orgeat Soda

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz orgeat

  • 8 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Pour Orgeat into a cocktail shaker with one ice cube and shake until you hear that the ice cube have fully melted.
  • Pour the chilled and aerated orgeat into a glass.
  • Slowly pour the soda water straight down into the top of the drink. This will build both body and a foam head.

Featured Video

History Of Orgeat Soda.

The earliest record of orgeat soda I can find comes from an April 1, 1891 periodical called “The Pharmaceutical Era.” In a list of Soda syrup flavors sold by B. & C. (Beach & Clarridge), one of them is orgeat soda syrup. Almonds have long been used to flavor drinks, and almond-flavored syrup is typically called orgeat. As I said, this is the earliest use of orgeat soda I can find, but orgeat was already familiar in bars long before this.

The history of orgeat is it began as barley water. Its name comes from the Latin word hordeaceus, which translates to “of barley” or instead made of barley. Over time the barley water became sweeter, and variations emerged. One of these variations is the Spanish tiger nut horchata and the almond orzata/orgeat. The English word orgeat comes from the word orge, Which is French for barley. In parts of northern Africa, “rozata” is an almond drink typically prepared for weddings or special occasions. Most countries along the Mediterranean Sea have some barley/nut drink whose romantic name is derived from the Latin word hordeaceus. Over time, these nut juices were sweetened and concentrated into a syrup that could be used in many different drinks.

The earliest reference to orgeat in the Americas that I can find is from a 1779 newspaper article detailing the goods sold in a shop in Newport, R.I. The particular store owner was a man named Nathan Hart, and he even had orgeat listed under the “Liqueurs” section and not the standard grocery. This shows that orgeat was used in alcoholic drinks even in the 18th century, predating Jerry Thomas’s early use of it by 80 years. Orgeat’s use as a sweetener in American-style alcoholic mixed drinks most likely originated in the late 18th century.

Soda fountains became technologically viable in the 1830s when New Yorker John Matthews invented a lead-lined container to carbonate water with sulfuric acid and calcium carbonate that could easily fit under the counter or behind a bar. Without going too much into the history of soda fountains, Orgeat was most likely first mixed with soda water around the 1860s or 1870s when soda fountains started to boom in popularity. If you want an excellent old-fashioned Orgeat recipe, check mine out.

How To Get A Nice Foam On Your Sodas.

It was typical for high-end sodas in the late 1800s to have a nice foam on top. Similar to high-end molecular gastronomy restaurants today, a nice soda fountain would ensure that some drinks had an air or foam on top as you sipped your drink. The foam provides both a creamy texture and olfactory stimulation. These were called foaming agents, and in the 1800s, soap bark or other extracts were added to syrups to provide foam when shaken and mixed with soda water. A popular one today in the United States is propylene glycol, and while it is “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) in the US, it is banned for consumption in the EU. Another modern alternative, and the one I use, is adding lecithin to my syrups. Lecithin is flavor neutral, a natural emulsifier that provides a nice foam, and is often taken as a health supplement. It is also the foaming agent many high-end restaurants use to make foams for food. So I’ll add 0.5% of the total syrups weight of lecithin powder to my syrups as a foaming agent. Check out my orgeat recipe for exactly how that is done.

If you want to learn more about this topic and make your drinks better, check out De Forest Saxe’s 1894 book “Saxe’s New Guide Hints to Soda Water Dispensers. Another book I highly recommend reading is Darcy S. O’Neil’s absolutely fascinating book Fix The Pumps, which covers the history and standard practices of early soda fountains.

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Coconut Lime Soda – Recipe

Coconut Lime Soda

Coconut Lime Soda

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

120

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

Make an old fashion coconut lime soda

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Cream of Coconut

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 8 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine cream of coconut and lime juice in a cocktail shaker with two ice cubes and shake until you hear that the ice cubes have fully melted.
  • Pour the mixed cream of coconut and lime juice into a glass.
  • Slowly pour the soda water straight down into the top of the drink. This will build both body and a foam head.

Featured Video

What Does The Coconut Lime Soda Taste Like?

Coconut lime soda is a fantastic drink that perfectly balances the sour flavor of the limes with the coconut’s rich, creamy sweetness. The effervescence of the soda water combines these flavors into a refreshing drink suitable for both children and adults—a classic paring of flavors that is easy to make at home.

How To Get A Nice Foam On Your Sodas.

It was typical for high-end sodas in the late 1800s to have a nice foam on top. Similar to high-end molecular gastronomy restaurants today, a nice soda fountain would ensure that some drinks had an air or foam on top as you sipped your drink. The foam provides both a creamy texture and olfactory stimulation. These were called foaming agents, and in the 1800s, soap bark or other extracts were added to syrups to provide foam when shaken and mixed with soda water. A popular one today in the United States is propylene glycol, and while it is “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) in the US, it is banned for consumption in the EU. Another modern alternative, and the one I use, is adding lecithin to my syrups. Lecithin is flavor neutral, a natural emulsifier that provides a nice foam, and is often taken as a health supplement. It is also the foaming agent many high-end restaurants use to make foams for food. So I’ll add 0.5% of the total syrups weight of lecithin powder to my syrups as a foaming agent. Check out my Cream of Coconut recipe for exactly how that is done.

If you want to learn more about this topic and make your drinks better, check out De Forest Saxe’s 1894 book “Saxe’s New Guide Hints to Soda Water Dispensers. Another book I highly recommend reading is Darcy S. O’Neil’s absolutely fascinating book Fix The Pumps, which covers the history and standard practices of early soda fountains.

Recipe Resources

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Shirley Temple – History & Recipe

Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

100

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a old fashion Shirley Temple

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Grenadine

  • 8 oz Ginger Ale

Directions

  • Add grenadine and 1 or 2 ice cubes to a cocktail shaker.
  • Shake till the cubes are fully dissolved. This helps form the drinks foam.
  • Pour the cooled and aerated grenadine into the bottom a glass and gently add ginger ale.

Featured Video

The History Of The Shirley Temple Drink.

The Shirley Temple was a very difficult drink to research, and I could not find any mention of it in magazines, books, or even newspapers until 1957. By the 1960s, the drink seems to be firmly named Shirley Temple, and many magazines and books mention it by name. In the October 25, 1957 issue of the Milford Chronicle from Delaware, an article by Elaine Dickerson mentions taking young girls (7 years old or so) to tour an Air Force base and bringing them to the Base’s Officer’s Club to get Shirley Temples. The author explains it is a ginger ale drink with fruit flavor added. Most mentions of the Shirley Temple from the 1960s described it as a drink made of Grenadine and either ginger ale, sprite, or lemonade. A 1961 book called “Where Shall We Take the Kids” says the drink used to be called a Davy Crockett, but I cannot find any other source that calls it this. This book also says the Shirley temple is made with pineapple, cherry, and orange juice.

With all the different recipes and the fact that I could only find the name linked to the drink in the late 1950s, I instead researched these combinations of ingredients. I found the Shirley Temple resembles temperance-era Grenadine Punches from the 1920s. Many of the non-alcoholic Grenadine Punch recipes from that time were mixtures of grenadine and sprite with fruit, grenadine and ginger ale with cherries, or grenadine mixed with pineapple juice, soda, and fruit. This primarily lines up with the various Shirley Temple recipes of the 1960s and a quick google search today shows that everything has stayed the same. Most modern recipes are grenadine and ginger ale, but many use sprite too. I even found a few that add pineapple and other juices. I wasn’t alive during the 1920s to 1960s, nor can I find anything that states the Shirley Temple is a temperance-era grenadine punch, but it seems like it was to me based on the similarity of the recipes. Who knows when or why the drink was named after the famous 1930s child actress? But if made with care, it is a delicious soda and one I loved as a child.

How To Get A Nice Foam On Your Sodas.

While the Shirley Temple is not from the 1800s, it was typical for high-end sodas in the late 1800s to have a nice foam on top. Similar to high-end molecular gastronomy restaurants today, a nice soda fountain would ensure that some drinks had an air or foam on top as you sipped your drink. The foam provides both a creamy texture and olfactory stimulation. These were called foaming agents, and in the 1800s, soap bark or other extracts were added to syrups to provide foam when shaken and mixed with soda water. A popular one today in the United States is propylene glycol, and while it is “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) in the US, it is banned for consumption in the EU. Another modern alternative, and the one I use, is adding lecithin to my syrups. Lecithin is flavor neutral, a natural emulsifier that provides a nice foam, and is often taken as a health supplement. It is also the foaming agent many high-end restaurants use to make foams for food. So I’ll add 0.5% of the total syrups weight of lecithin powder to my syrups as a foaming agent. Check out my grenadine recipe for exactly how that is done.

If you want to learn more about this topic and make your drinks better, check out De Forest Saxe’s 1894 book “Saxe’s New Guide Hints to Soda Water Dispensers. Another book I highly recommend reading is Darcy S. O’Neil’s absolutely fascinating book Fix The Pumps, which covers the history and standard practices of early soda fountains.

Recipe Resources

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Old Pal – Classic Recipe & History

Old Pal

Old Pal

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

120

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

How to make an Old Pal

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, and express a lemon peel over the top.

Featured Video

History Of The Old Pal Cocktail

The oldest reference to the Old Pal I can find is on page 82 of the 1927 book “Barflies and Cocktails” by Harry McElhone. The recipe (Along with the oldest reference to the Boulevardier) comes from the contribution section of the book by Author Moss, who writes about some of his favorite cocktails around London and their origins told by the bartenders who make them. Author Moss writes:

“I remember way back in 1878, on the 30th of February to be exact, when the writer was discussing the subject with my old pal “Sparrow” Robertson and he said to yours truly, “get away with that stuff, my old pal, here’s the drink I invented when I Fired the pistol the first time at the old powderhall foot races and you can’t go wrong if you put a bet down on 1/3 Canadian Club, 1/3 Eyetalian Vermouth, and 1/3 Campari,” and then he told the writer that he would dedicate the cocktail to me and call it, My Old Pal.”

This is satirically written as there is no 30th of February, and Eyetalian is phonetically written to imitate someone with a heavy accent saying Italian. Italian Vermouth is also different from the typical vermouth used. Dry Vermouth is. McElhone seems to correct this when he adds the Old Pal as a recipe in his 1930 book “ABCs of Mixing Cocktails.” Recipe 208 on page 65 for the Old Pal is 1/3 Canadian Club Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth, and 1/3 Campari. And states the recipe is by “Sparrow” Robertson, the sporting editor of the New York Herald in Paris.

The Old Pal is a fantastic cocktail and my preferred version of Campari with vermouth and spirit. If you like Boulevardiers or Negronis, then this is a must-try.

Variations Of This Cocktail.

Popular variations of this kind of cocktail are:

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Monte Carlo – Classic Recipe & History

Monte Carlo

Monte Carlo

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

How to make a Monte Carlo.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 1 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, and express a lemon peel over the top.

Featured Video

The History Of The Monte Carlo

The earliest printed recipe for the Monte Carlo I can find comes from the 1948 Book “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks” by David Embury. The Monte Carlo is a rye whiskey variation of the older Kentucky Colonel cocktail, which uses bourbon instead. Named after the prominent ward of Monaco, the Monte Carlo is a beautiful blend of sweet herbs and spices. The sharp, spicy flavors of the rye whiskey are cut by the sweet herbal flavors of the benedictine, and the two come together in a wonderfully balanced cocktail. This is a must-try if you’re a fan of the Bobby Burns or Manhattan.

Recipe Resources

I have the 1961 edition linked below because that is the only one I can find for free online, but this cocktail is the same as the 1948 edition.

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Coconut Collins – Refreshing Recipe

Coconut Collins

Coconut Collins

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

200

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

How to make a Coconut Collins.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Cream of Coconut

  • 2 oz White Rum

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake the shaker for 5 seconds.
  • Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly, add the soda water.

Featured Video

A Fantastic Coconut Collins Cocktail.

The coconut collins is a fantastic cocktail that tastes similar to the Coco Loco. Adding soda water in the coconut collins instead of coconut water like in the coco loco gives this drink a lighter, bubbly, and more refreshing taste. A quick look online will show other coconut collins recipes, but I tried to model this recipe using the traditional collins cocktail structure, and it works well.

The History Of The Collins Cocktail.

While probably not invented by Harry Johnson, his 1882 Bartenders Manual is the oldest printed book I could find to mention the Collins cocktail. The oldest concrete evidence of this cocktail is the Harry Johnson one. It seems both the John Collins and Tom Collins are invented around the same time, and the Bartenders Manual gives a pretty definitive recipe for both the John and Tom Collins. His John Collins recipe calls for genever (dry gin doesn’t start to get mixed into cocktails till the end of the 1800s/early 1900s), and his recipe for the Tom Collins calls for Old Tom gin. Harry Johnson’s collins recipes and names are clearly defined, but unlike Harry Johnson, Jerry Thomas’s 1887 Bartenders Guide does not follow his recipes. The Bartender’s Guide doesn’t even mention the John Collins but instead uses the name Tom Collins for every variation of the collins. It has three different recipes for Tom Collins. A Tom Collins whiskey, a Tom Collins brandy, and a Tom Collins genever. It doesn’t mention the Tom Collins with Old Tom gin and calls the one made with genever a Tom Collins.

To further complicate this, in 1885, a British cocktail book called “The New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef” by Bacchus and Cordon Bleu has a recipe for what they call a Fred Collins. Their Fred Collins Recipe is a Whiskey Collins with orange liqueur instead of simple syrup. Their Collins section states, “I should be glad if our caterers would agree what it is to be perpetually named. One Barkeeper calls it a John Collins – another Tom Collins. Harry and Fred are all members of the same family.” They then say they prefer the Fred Collins name, thus credence to Jerry Thomas’s version of the Collins in that the name is more a style than a specific drink. Hell, there was a Harry Collins we have never seen. The Savoy Cocktail Book does the same thing and has both a Dry Gin and Whiskey Tom Collins. Although The Savoy does say that a Tom Collins made with genever is instead called a John Collins.

While Harry Johnson uses the names as specific cocktails, the Bartenders guide and others seemed to use the collins as a cocktail structure more than a particular recipe. Like the Rickey, Daisy, or Fizz, the collins describe a structure of 2 parts base spirit, 1 part citrus, 1 part sweetener, and 4 or 5 parts carbonated beverage. Harry Johnson’s influence has been permanent, and the collins is ultimately both. It is a specific cocktail that Harry Johnson pushed and a cocktail archetype like others believed. Looking at its influence as an archetype, many popular cocktails are structurally collins that you would not think of as a Collins. The Mojito, French 75, Paloma, etc., are just fun variations on the Collins form.

Recipe Resources

The link below does not contain the coconut collins recipe, but the classic John collins this cocktail is modeled off.

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Cherry Bounce – Cherry Juice Recipe

Cherry Bounce (Juice)

Cherry Bounce (Cherry Juice Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

25

servings
Calories

300

kcal
Total time

0

minutes

How to make a delicious Cherry Bounce.

Ingredients

  • 12 cups Tart Cherry Juice

  • 1 bottle 100 Proof Apple Brandy

  • 6 cups Simple Syrup/Sugar

  • 1 whole Cinnamon Stick

  • 4 whole Cloves

  • 1 tbsp Bitter Almond Extract

  • 2 tbsp Vanilla Extract

Directions

  • To a bottle of high-proof apple brandy, add a cinnamon stick, cloves, vanilla extract, and bitter almond extract. Let this sit for 24 to 48 hours.
  • Strain spices out of the brandy and mix the apple brandy with cherry juice and sugar. Serve.

Featured Video

What Is Cherry Bounce?

Traditional Cherry Bounce appears to be the sweetened alcoholic liqueur infused with tart cherries. It takes around six months to make brandied cherries, so simultaneously, a quicker cherry bounce recipe existed for mixing brandy and cherry juice. According to the Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang, the earliest known reference to Cherry Bounce comes from the 1693 Robertson’s Phraseologia Generalis. In Robertson’s Phraseologia Generalis (A Latin text on general English phrases), the drink is referred to as “Cherry-Bouncer” and only mentioned it as a mixed drink. The next mention of it comes from the George Washington family. A recipe for cherry bounce was found in a stack of Martha Washingtons’ papers written on George Washingtons’ watermarked stationery. The recipe was in neither George nor Martha’s handwriting, and it is unknown who wrote it. The recipe is as follows:

“To Make Excellent Cherry Bounce. Extract the juice of 20 pounds well ripend morrella cherrys Add to this 10 quarts of old french brandy and sweeten it with white sugar to your taste—To 5 Gallons of this mixture add one ounce of spice such as cinnamon, cloves and Nutmegs of each an Equal quantity slightly bruisd and a pint and half of cherry kirnels that have been gently broken in a mortar—After the liquor has fermented let it stand close-stoped for a month or six weeks then bottle it remembering to put a lump of Loaf Sugar into each bottle.”

During the 19th century, a few drinks and cookbooks mention cherry bounce but not many. Some books state to sweeten the cherry liqueur, and others say to mix cherry juice with spices and brandy. Not to say all recipes adhered to this structure, but the trend I noticed was cherry bounce recipes made from the cherry-infused liqueur only sweetened the liqueur, and recipes that called for mixing cherry juice, sugar, and brandy also added spices. I don’t know if there was a reason for that, but that was consistent. One of the best recipes for a cherry bounce comes from the 1892 Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery. The author provides both an infused recipe and a cherry juice recipe that also sticks to the trend of only spicing the cherry juice. The recipe below is the cherry liqueur recipe from that book.

Does Cherry Bounce Need To Be Refrigerated?

It depends on which recipe you make whether cherry bounce needs to be refrigerated. Cherry bounce made with juice should be refrigerated. While it does have alcohol in it, it’s not enough to stop the growth of bacteria. If it’s the cherry infusion recipe, it does not need to be refrigerated while it soaks, so long as the cherries are fully submerged. Every old recipe I have found for a cherry bounce that uses the infusion method does not refrigerate them, but if you have a refrigerator, why not use it? Home refrigeration started becoming common in the 1930s, so while it wasn’t an option for many folks making cherry bounce in the 19th century, it is for you. And keeping it in the fridge takes the worry out of storing it. There is no downside to keeping it in the refrigerator.

Two Different Ways To Make Cherry Bounce.

This is the quicker cherry juice recipe for making cherry bounce. If you want the brandied cherry infusion recipe, you can find that one here.

I first heard of cherry bounce from a website saying it was George Washington’s favorite drink. After researching the drink a bit, I kept coming across two different ways of making the same drink. One recipe would add cherry juice to brandy, sugar, and spices; the other was to make brandied cherries and drink the sweetened liqueur. I was trying to decide which was the right way to make it. Still, after a bit of reading and checking my sources, I believe both ways are correct—the Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery by Theodore Garrett list both methods as ways of making cherry bounce. The 7-volume Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery is a very high-quality resource. It is such a well-written, thorough, and culinarily educated book that I will take it for its word.

I get the impression the liqueur version is the older of the two and was invented out of a desire not to waste the boozy juice left over from preserving cherries. The juicing method was developed as a quick way to make the drink without waiting six months and make a more drinkable version of it. If you want to compare the two, the one made with cherry juice is fruiter and much easier to drink. The infused version is more like a cherry old-fashioned.

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Cherry Bounce – Cherry Infusion Recipe

Cherry Bounce (Infusion)

Cherry Bounce (Infusion Recipe)

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

120

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

How to make a traditional Cherry Bounce.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Cherry Bounce Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup/Sugar

  • Optional Spices

Directions

  • Add all the ingredients and Ice to a mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, and serve.

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What Is Cherry Bounce?

Traditional Cherry Bounce appears to be the sweetened alcoholic liqueur infused with tart cherries. It takes around six months to make brandied cherries, so simultaneously, a quicker cherry bounce recipe existed for mixing brandy and cherry juice. According to the Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang, the earliest known reference to Cherry Bounce comes from the 1693 Robertson’s Phraseologia Generalis. In Robertson’s Phraseologia Generalis (A Latin text on general English phrases), the drink is referred to as “Cherry-Bouncer” and only mentioned it as a mixed drink. The next mention of it comes from the George Washington family. A recipe for cherry bounce was found in a stack of Martha Washingtons’ papers written on George Washingtons’ watermarked stationery. The recipe was in neither George nor Martha’s handwriting, and it is unknown who wrote it. The recipe is as follows:

“To Make Excellent Cherry Bounce. Extract the juice of 20 pounds well ripend morrella cherrys Add to this 10 quarts of old french brandy and sweeten it with white sugar to your taste—To 5 Gallons of this mixture add one ounce of spice such as cinnamon, cloves and Nutmegs of each an Equal quantity slightly bruisd and a pint and half of cherry kirnels that have been gently broken in a mortar—After the liquor has fermented let it stand close-stoped for a month or six weeks then bottle it remembering to put a lump of Loaf Sugar into each bottle.”

During the 19th century, a few drinks and cookbooks mention cherry bounce but not many. Some books state to sweeten the cherry liqueur, and others say to mix cherry juice with spices and brandy. Not to say all recipes adhered to this structure, but the trend I noticed was cherry bounce recipes made from the cherry-infused liqueur only sweetened the liqueur, and recipes that called for mixing cherry juice, sugar, and brandy also added spices. I don’t know if there was a reason for that, but that was consistent. One of the best recipes for a cherry bounce comes from the 1892 Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery. The author provides both an infused recipe and a cherry juice recipe that also sticks to the trend of only spicing the cherry juice. The recipe below is the cherry liqueur recipe from that book.

Does Cherry Bounce Need To Be Refrigerated?

It depends on which recipe you make whether cherry bounce needs to be refrigerated. Cherry bounce made with juice should be refrigerated. While it does have alcohol in it, it’s not enough to stop the growth of bacteria. If it’s the cherry infusion recipe, it does not need to be refrigerated while it soaks, so long as the cherries are fully submerged. Every old recipe I have found for a cherry bounce that uses the infusion method does not refrigerate them, but if you have a refrigerator, why not use it? Home refrigeration started becoming common in the 1930s, so while it wasn’t an option for many folks making cherry bounce in the 19th century, it is for you. And keeping it in the fridge takes the worry out of storing it. There is no downside to keeping it in the refrigerator.

Two Different Ways To Make Cherry Bounce.

This is the 6-month-long whole cherry infusion recipe for making cherry bounce. If you want the cherry juice recipe, you can find that one here.

I first heard of cherry bounce from a website saying it was George Washington’s favorite drink. After researching the drink a bit, I kept coming across two different ways of making the same drink. One recipe would add cherry juice to brandy, sugar, and spices; the other was to make brandied cherries and drink the sweetened liqueur. I was trying to decide which was the right way to make it. Still, after a bit of reading and checking my sources, I believe both ways are correct—the Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery by Theodore Garrett list both methods as ways of making cherry bounce. The 7-volume Encyclopaedia of Practical Cookery is a very high-quality resource. It is such a well-written, thorough, and culinarily educated book that I will take it for its word.

I get the impression the liqueur version is the older of the two and was invented out of a desire not to waste the boozy juice left over from preserving cherries. The juicing method was developed as a quick way to make the drink without waiting six months and make a more drinkable version of it. If you want to compare the two, the one made with cherry juice is fruiter and much easier to drink. The infused version is more like a cherry old-fashioned.

Recipe Resources

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Discover More Classics

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