Clear Ice Cubes- Easiest And Fastest Way To Make Perfect Ice Cubes

Clear Ice Cubes
Clear Ice Cubes

How To Make Clear Ice.

The only way to make clear ice is to freeze water in one direction so that the dissolved oxygen is pushed back. Water put in an ice tray will freeze from the outside in. This traps the dissolved air in the cube’s center, which gives it a cloudy look. By freezing in one direction, air never gets stuck in the ice.

The easiest way to freeze in one direction is to freeze the water slowly from the top down in an insulated cooler. An insulated cooler prevents the sides and bottom from freezing and forces the water to freeze from the top down. It can take a day or two to freeze the top layer, but the result will be a nice transparent thick layer of ice on the top. It’s just that simple.

The reason water freezes from the top-down have to do with its density at different temperatures. Water, like anything else, gets denser as it gets colder, but once it freezes, it crystallizes and expands, becoming less dense. This is why icebergs and ice cubes float. At 15°C, water has a density of 999.1 kg/m3. At 1°C, it gets heavier at 999.9 kg/m3, but once it freezes at -1°C, it expands to a weight of 998.12 kg/m3. As a result, cooler water will always drop, and warmer water will always rise to the top. The top layer of water will cool and fall, and the next layer will rise to the top to cool till it drops. This cycle continues until all the water in the cooler drops to 1°C. At this point, there is no more warm water to replace the dropping cold water, and the top layer will crystalize and freeze. Each new layer of ice will expand and freeze to the topmost layer of ice. The water’s expanding and freezing cycle continues from the top-down, forming a crystal transparent top layer of ice. Air will not crystalize or bond to the other ice, so it is pushed down. Air Will continue to get pushed down till it has nowhere else to go, thus forming cloudy-looking air bubbles.

What Type Of Mold Makes Clear Ice?

No ice mold makes clear ice. The only way to get clear ice is to freeze it from the top down. Any mold can be placed at the top of an insulated cooler filled with water to make clear ice. The mold needs a hole in the bottom for the dissolved air to be pushed through.

What Are The Benefits Of Clear Ice?

The two main benefits of clear ice is it melts slower and is visually more appealing. The truth is that clear ice melts at the same rate regardless of whether it is clear. It seems to melt slower because clear ice is all frozen water, while cloudy ice is a mix of frozen water and cold air. For this reason, a clear cube will weigh more than a cloudy cube, and extra water keeps its temperature longer. The trapped cold air will not hold at all, and once it is freed from the ice, it releases into the atmosphere. To provide numbers, water requires 4,200 joules of energy to change a kilogram of water by 1°C. Air-only requires 1,006 joules of energy to change the same air mass by 1°C. It’s not that the ice is melting slower. There is more of it to slow down the melting process.

Does Distilled Water Makes Clear Ice?

The mineral content has nothing to do with the clarity of the ice. Again the main cloudiness comes from the trapped air bubbles. If the water is frozen slowly in a large insulated container, the dissolved minerals are pushed down as the water freezes, similar to the dissolved gas. Using distilled water would only make and if the ice cubes were made the usual way by placing an ice tray in the freezer with the whole cube freezing. Technically there should be a difference, but I have personally never noticed a difference between using distilled and regular water, even when making regular cubes.

I have noticed a big difference between ice cubes made from the water straight from the tap and water that rested on the counter for an hour. This is because while in the pipe, water is under 4x the pressure it would be under in a typical atmospheric environment. This increased pressure results in more dissolved gas in the water. Similar to how carbonated beverages are bottled under pressure to maintain their carbonation, most of that carbonations escape once they are opened. Water that has rested on the counter for an hour is more effective than distilled water. You’ll even see the dissolved bubbles reforming and concentrating inside the glass.

Should I Boil Water To Make Clear Ice?

If you are freezing the water slowly then hot water does not matter. Although if you are freezing the water rapidly, like in a normal ice try, then starting with hot water will result in a clearer cube. The reason for this has to do with internal and atomspeheric pressures. The greater the reletive atomspeheric pressure the more disolved gas in the water. typical water pipes are around 60PSI (41kPa) which is 4x atomspeheric pressure at sea level. For this reason there will be 4x the amount of disolved air in water from the tap then there is in water left on the counter for a few hours. This can be observed by filling a glass of water from the tap and then leaving it on the counter to decompress. After an hour air bubbles will form inside the glass as it comes to atomopheric pressure.

Boiling is loosely related to temperature and results from when the vapor phase pressure equals atmospheric pressure. This is why 100°C and 212°F are measured at sea level. Water boils at lower temperatures at higher elevations and higher temperatures when under increased pressure. More dissolved gas is dispersed by increasing the internal pressure relative to the atmospheric pressure. If the hot water is quickly added to an ice tray and placed in the freezer, the outside of the cube quickly freezes, sealing out the atmospheric gas. It’s not perfect, but it will result in a more transparent cube than a cube made from room temperature water. Then again, if frozen slowly in a large insulated container, the temperature makes no difference.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Clear Ice Cubes

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

0

kcal
Total time

15

minutes

Learn the easy way to make perfectly crystal clear ice cubes

Ingredients

  • 2 Gallon Water

  • 1-3 Unit Ice Molds

  • 1 Unit 9 qt. Insulated Cooler

Directions

  • Punch 2-3 small holes in the bottom of the ice molds for dissolved air to move through.
  • Position molds at the top of a small insulated cooler.
  • Fill the cooler with water to the top of the ice molds and place in the freezer.
  • Let the water slowly freeze for 24 – 48 hours till the molds are completely frozen.
  • Remove the Ice molds and remove the crystal clear ice cubes.

Recipe Video

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Related Articles

Navy Grog – Make Donn Beach’s Classic Tiki Cocktail

Navy Grog Donn Beach
Navy Grog Donn Beach

Donn Beach Navy Grog Recipe Vs Victor Bergeron’s Recipe.

Donn Beach and Victor Bergeron’s Navy Grog recipes are similar and practically the same drink. The only difference between the two recipes is that Donn Beach uses honey instead of allspice dram and has an ounce of soda water added. The Biggest difference is the ice. Donn Beach’s recipe calls for a shaved ice cone around the straw. Victor Bergeron’s recipe call for shaking the cocktail with shaved or crushed ice and then pouring the entire contents of the shaker, ice and all, into the glass.

Shaken With Shaved Ice Vs Ice Cone.

While both cocktails are shaken with ice, the Trader Vic version does a dirty pour and includes the ice, while the Donn Beach version strains out the shaken ice and uses an ice cone in the glass. Keep in mind the ice cone is only used in Donn Beach’s navy grog cocktail. No other cocktail uses it, so I wouldn’t spend any money on a dedicated ice cone maker. The navy grog wasn’t the only tiki cocktail to use ice uniquely. Fun decorative ice was regularly used in the classic tiki scene—ice cones, ice caves, dirty pours, ice frill, etc. I think the trader Vic dirty pour is more practical and makes more sense, but the ice cone does have a following.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Navy Grog – Donn Beach Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

296

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Make A Classic Navy Grog Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3/4 oz Lime Juice

  • 3/4 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 3/4 oz Honey Syrup

  • 1 oz White Rum

  • 1 oz Black Rum

  • 1 oz Aged Rum

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients into a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into a lowball glass with a decorative ice cone and straw.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Green Tea Punch – Make This Delicious Early American Style Punch

Green Tea Punch
Green Tea Punch

A Short History Of Punch

Punches are some of the oldest types of mixed drinks invented out of necessity. Early merchant sailors brought tons of beer with them as they voyaged to distant exotic lands. These voyages, often to India, were long, and beer has a relatively short shelf life. Toward the end of each trip, the booze had long gone unpalatably flat or was completely spoiled (This is how IPAs were invented, too. Adding a lot more hops helped preserve the beer and kept it from tasting flat by the end of the trip. Too bad IPAs taste awful). Every culture has its local distilled booze, and in India, it was arrack. Arrack is a little rough, so it was mixed with juices, black tea, and sugar to make it taste better. It was brought back to England and spread to other English colonies.

The earliest records of the punch style of preparing drinks date to the early 1600s. By the mid-1800s, you don’t hear much about punches. That’s not to say these ever really fell out of fashion, but this style doesn’t make sense commercially. Around the mid-1800s, saloons started to get popular, and the recipes and information that started to get recorded were saved are the more profitable commercial style of mixed drinks. Some examples of taverns or restaurants made punches, but the technique is mainly used for residential free for all drinking and not pay per drink businesses. Restaurants don’t want to make a ton and then potentially end the night with leftover stock and then need to dump it. Also, you need a bartender there to track how much people drink; it can’t have free for all and expect to get paid correctly, so it makes more sense to have that individual make drinks as ordered. These are more suited for college parties or house parties, or we just wrote the declaration of independence so let’s get drunk parties. Even though I’ve read a few articles about this becoming vogue in the last decade or so, I’ve only ever seen one bar that had one house punch, but almost every house party or DIY wedding I’ve been to has 2 or 3 different punches on hand.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Green Tea Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Make this tasty green tea punch.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1.5 oz Green Tea

  • 1/3 oz Peach Brandy

  • 1/2 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Batavia Arrack

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in a large punch bowl or pitcher.
  • Add Ice to chill and pour out individual servings.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Yale Cocktail – Make The Beautiful Original 1895 Recipe

Yale
Yale

The History Of The Yale Cocktail.

The Yale cocktail dates back to the late 1800s, and the oldest printed recipe I can find for it is from the 1895 book Modern American Drinks by George Kappeler. There are two main recipes for the Yale, this one and the Waldorf-Astoria recipe, and they are both very different drinks. They differ because the Waldorf-Astoria recipe is half Old Tom Gin and half sweet vermouth instead of a dash of Peychaud bitters. While the Old Waldorf-Astoria book was printed in 1935, it documents the recipes used by the bar between the 1890s to the 1920s. Therefore both Yale recipes are from the same period, and the two recipes are also both from New York. They were just two different recipes from two different bars.

Cocktails Inspired By The Ivy League Universities.

In the United States, there is a collection of 8 universities referred to as the Ivy League universities. The term is used to group the universities by their sporting league, but it also eludes their heritage. 7 of the 8 were universities before the American Revolution, Cornell being the odd man out, and hold themselves in high esteem. There are two other elite pre-revolution Universities, but they are too far from the others to be part of the same league. A sportswriter first coined the term Ivy League in the 1930s, describing the upcoming football season.

Like any good sports rivalry, each university in the Ivy League also has a cocktail named after them. The Harvard and Yale cocktails are the most famous of the Ivy League cocktails and for a good reason. As you can also see, I know absolutely nothing about team sports. I know there are balls and points, but past that, not much else. I was more of a D&D and Japanese manga kind of kid.

About George Kappeler And The New York Holland House Hotel.

Like the Waldorf-Astoria, the Holland House Hotel in New York had one of the best bars in the country. Interestingly both hotels were right down the street from each other, Holland House on 30th and 5th, and the Waldorf-Astoria on 34th and 5th, the present-day location of the Empire State Building. Opened December 7th, 1891, the interior of the Holland house was considered its prized jewel. The New York Times in 1891 praised its beautiful carved marble interiors, ornate rooms, and mosaic floors and described the hotel as a marvel of bronze, marble, and glasswork. Managing the hotel’s cafe and restaurant Bar was one of the top bartenders in the New York George Kappeler. He’s credited with inventing many famous cocktails, a few still popular today, and was the first to describe a classic whiskey cocktail as old-fashioned. He used the term old-fashioned to differentiate it from his other fancy and standard whiskey cocktails. George published his first cocktail book in 1895 and an updated second edition in 1906.

The good times did not last, though, and by the mid-1910s, most of the wealthy New York clients moved further north to park avenue, and the hotel started to fall on hard times. With the passing of the 18th amendment and the Volstead Act on January 17th, 1920, the hotel’s few remaining revenue streams dried up, and the hotel was sold. The Holland house closed that same year and was converted to an office building. The interior was gutted to make room for office spaces, and like the Waldorf-Astoria, a vital piece of American cocktail history was lost. Although, unlike the Waldorf-Astoria, the building is still standing on 30th and 5th next to Marble Collegiate Church. The grand interior is long gone, but it’s still fun to see the façade of the once-great Holland House.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Yale Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

189

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a classic Yale cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 1 dash Peychaud Bitters

  • 1.5 oz Old Tom Gin

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 10 – 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink. 
  • Strain into glass and garnish with a lemon peel, then discard lemon peel.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Nika Cocktail | Make This Amazing One Piece Inspired Cocktail

Nika
Nika

What Does The Nika Taste Like?

The Nika taste like a lightly bittersweet and herbal soju. The ingredients pair nicely and are strong while not overwhelming. It’s pretty lovely. I came up with the Nika to celebrate one of my favorite stories, One Piece. As of writing, chapter 1044 was just released, and the main protagonist, Luffy, has undergone a massive story-changing transformation. I love One Piece, and I don’t try to hide that.

I wanted the base spirit to be cachaça because, in the SBS of volume 56, someone had asked the author, Oda, if the story took place in our real world, what the nationalities of each character would be. Oda replied that the main character, Luffy, would be Brazilian. Cachaça turned out to be an excellent choice. Even though it’s more closely related to rum than vodka, it has a very lightly sweet and fresh green grassy vodka-like taste. I don’t know why I don’t use it more often, but it’s beautiful. I feel like I, along with many others, woefully underutilize cachaça, and it comes together nicely in this bright sunny cocktail.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Nika Cocktail

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

193

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

See how to make a Nika cocktail

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Gum Syrup

  • 1 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 2 dashes Orange Bitters

  • 1 oz Cocchi Americano

  • 2 oz Cachaça

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass, garnish with an expressed lemon peel.

Recipe Video

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Planters Punch #3 – Make Trader Vic’s Delicious 1972 Recipe

Planters Punch 3
Planters Punch 3

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Trader Vic’s 1972 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

I include this one because it’s pretty on point. Like the others, it has a citrus, syrup (including grenadine), and rum. But something Victor Bergeron brought back that most other versions lack, but classic punches have water. Also, in his 1972 book, he has a special section for this cocktail where he includes six different recipes and says there is no such thing as a proper Planter’s punch. He mentions people coming into the bar trying to educate him on what makes an authentic Planter’s Punch. Each one is different, and Vic lays out that there is a Planter’s Punch for every island in the Caribbean.

  • 1/2 oz (15 mLs) Lime Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Dark Simple Syrup
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Soda Water

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Planter’s Punch – 1972 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

161

kcal
ABV

13%

Total time

3

minutes

Make Trader Vic’s 1970s Planters Punch

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Dark Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Shake the shaker only a little since soda water will be added.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all.
  • Top off with soda water.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Planters Punch #2 – Make This Fantastic 1933 Cuban Recipe

Planters Punch 2
Planters Punch 2

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Bar La Florida’s 1933 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

The Cuban versions are the first recipes I can find where grenadine is used, and it more closely resembles the Planter’s punch most people think of. Also, both Bar La Florida and Sloppy Joes have the same ingredients, but the recipe’s proportions vary a bit so I would consider this type the overall Cuban version of the planter’s punch. Bar La Florida’s seems a bit sweeter, and that’s the one I’m printing here.

  • 1/2 oz (15 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Orange Liqueur
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Gold Rum

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Planter’s Punch – 1933 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

154

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a Cuban style planter’s punch

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 barspoon Grenadine

  • 1 barspoon Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

Directions

  • Combine into a shaker, and add a scoop of shaved ice. If you do not have shaved ice then crushed ice will do.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour the whole shaker into the serving glass. Ice and all

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Planter’s Punch #1 – Make The Delicious Original 1878 Recipe

Planters Punch No1
Planters Punch No1

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Fun Magazine’s Sept 1878 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

This is the oldest currently known reference to the Planter’s punch. It was printed on page 102 of the September 1878 issue of Fun Magazine in the UK. Here is a link to that digitalized issue if you want to check it out. That first recipe is a pretty straightforward punch (I’ve updated the measurements to modern units from the older antiquated ones like wineglass or pony etc.):

  • 2 oz (60 mLs) Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 cup (120 g) Sugar
  • 6 oz (180 mLs) Gold Rum
  • 1 cup (240 mLs) Cold Water

That’s the extent of the recipe in Fun. The Recipe had no context or story. Just a simple recipe told as a ditty. The song is.

A wine-glass with lemon juice fill,
Of sugar the same glass fill twice
Then rub them together until
The mixture looks smooth, soft, and nice.

Of rum then three wine glasses add,
And four of cold water please take. A
Drink then you’ll have that’s not bad—
At least, so they say in Jamaica

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Planter’s Punch – 1878 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Jamaican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

300

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Make the oldest known planter’s punch recipe

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 3 oz Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in a large punch bowl or pitcher.
  • Add Ice to chill and pour out individual servings.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Paloma – Make This Refreshing Grapefruit Soda Cocktail

Paloma
Paloma

History Of The Paloma.

It isn’t easy to pin the Paloma down to any singular creation, and the truth is it most likely started as a simple, ubiquitous everyman’s drink. It is very uncommon to see tequila cocktails before the 1970s, except that being the margarita and a few other tiki drinks. Scanning through many Spanish, Mexican, American, and British cocktail books from 1909 to 1972, I could not find the Paloma or any grapefruit and tequila cocktail. David Wondrich points out in an article he wrote for the Daily Beast that some of the first mentions of this drink appear in the 1997 Mexican cookbook “A Cook’s Tour of Mexico” by Nancy Zaslavsky, where it is called a lazy man’s margarita and common in the town’s plaza.

The exciting takeaway from this is the drink didn’t seem to have a solid name yet (At least from what we know). This implies that this cocktail is still relatively new and, while popular with locals, has flown under the radar of those who write about Mexican food and drinks. I don’t want to assume this was the locals’ attempt at making an easy margarita. I believe they invented something unique with what was available. Structurally the Paloma is a rickey which is nothing like a margarita. The margarita falls into the sour style, so I will assume this is entirely a new drink. Obviously, with such limited information, assumptions have to be made. Still, from what I can tell, the local population was using cheap Squirt soda and limes to make cheap tequila taste better. If that history is somewhat correct, then I like that. That is the true cocktail creation story. Just a bunch of locals trying to find ways to make some bottom-shelf booze taste better, which is the origin of most of the famous old cocktails.

Dave Wondrich mentions in the article that one of the earliest places selling this cocktail with the name “Paloma” (Which means dove in Spanish) was the Tlaquepaque Restaurant in Orange County, California. Located about 20 minutes north of Disneyland (with no traffic, of course), this traditional Mexican restaurant and the local Mexican immigrant population helped bring this fantastic cocktail to California. The Paloma has since spread to the rest of the United States, but it is most popular in the southwest. As a southwest resident and someone who has been drinking since the early 2000s, I noticed the Paloma start to appear on Mexican menus around the mid to late 2000s. Today, every Mexican bar or restaurant in the city I live in has a Paloma.

Grapefruit Soda And Paloma Variations.

The oldest known way to make a Paloma is with grapefruit soda. Squirt was the first soda to be used in a Paloma, but many different brands all make excellent products. Some of the best options are:

  • Fever-Tree Pink Grapefruit
  • Jarritos Grapefruit
  • Schweppes Grapefruit
  • Fresca
  • San Pellegrino Grapefruit
  • Izze Grapefruit

The list goes on and on, but I think you get the idea. These are just some of the more common ones found at stores. So find a brand you like and go with that.

The other option for making a Paloma is to use fresh grapefruit juice. Using this method, you would substitute the 4 or 5 oz of grapefruit soda with a 1 oz grapefruit juice (Usually, white grapefruit juice is too tart in cocktails, but since there is a bit of syrup added, then white, pink, or red grapefruit works well), 1/2 oz simple syrup, and 3-4 oz soda water. Both ways are reasonable; it depends on your taste which you prefer. The soda version is sweeter, appeals more to the rum and coke crowd and the fresh grapefruit juice is much less sweet and appeals more to the sour cocktail crowd. Try both and see which you prefer. Also, keep in mind that this changes the structure of the cocktail. The soda version is structurally a rickey, and the fresh juice version is a collins. Rickey’s are a soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, and base spirit. Collins is soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, syrup, and sweetener. Ultimately, the final products of these two versions of the Paloma are similar enough, but if the structure is essential, that is something to keep in mind.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Paloma (Classic Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

214

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a classic Mexican Paloma cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 5 oz Grapefruit Soda

  • 2 Silver Tequila

Directions

  • In a highball glass with ice, combine the spirit and citrus juice.
  • Stir to combine the ingredients.
  • Top off with soda and give one last stir to combine.
  • Optional garnish of Chamoy and Tajin rim.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Latest Articles

Buttered Beer #2 | Make This Tasty Modern Buttered Beer

Buttered Beer #2
Buttered Beer #2

A Short History Of Cooked Beer Cocktails

Before the days of bottling and refrigeration, fresh beer had a very limited shelf life, and having to waste any brought a tear to many people’s eyes. So like any food item on its way out, people tried to find ways to get just a couple more uses out of it. I’m sure you do this all the time. Strawberries are starting to get soft; make a smoothie. Worried about your gigantic bag of onions getting too old, make French onion soup. There are many things you can do before food turns and during the 17th century cooking beer with honey and spices was one way to mask the flavor of a beer going bad.

Earlier forms of the hot ale flip we simple hot ale and honey drinks, and if you want to find these recipes, you’ll need to look in old cookbooks. One such recipe from the 1669 book “The Closet” by Sir Kenelme Digbie is an ale with a honey recipe specifically for beer that is about to go bad. Sir Kenelme Digbie described cooking old beer with honey would help the turned old beer and “set the whole a working a fresh, and casting out foulness.”

Some very old books had tips and tricks for the old food, but with the invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid-1800s, that stopped being such a big problem. Most of those recipes either got lost to time, but many still live on as things you usually eat—fruit pies, jellies, alcohol, pickles, hell, even banana bread. Hence, most recipes specifically call for nasty old soft brown bananas no one wants to eat. It’s for flavor, but it comes from a much older tradition. Old meat was a little harder to repurpose and was something you needed to persevere before it started to turn. Although old meat could be used as bait to catch fresh meat or go fishing, it must be disposed of once food goes truly bad.

The Right Beer Makes All The Difference

Not all beer heat up well. Some taste amazing, and some are awful. As mentioned above, cooked beer cocktails like this were usually done to beers that started to turn and lose flavor. So any flavor improvement was an improvement over drinking old beer, but this gives us some interesting insights into which beers heat up best. Generally speaking, I have found that milder and less flavorful beers taste better hot than more robust, darker beers. Check out my article here, where I have taste-tested many different beers to see which make the best flips. What I have noticed is heating a beer up intensifies its flavors. So a beer that is already very flavorful and strong is amplified and becomes completely undrinkable, while a more mild and light beer opens up beautifully. So it makes sense that older beers that had lost some of their flavors made delicious warmed beer cocktails in the past.

Spiced Butter Batter Recipe

  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Clove
  • 1/4 tsp (1.5 g) Ground Allspice (or 1/2 tbs: Allspice dram)
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) Vanilla extract 
  • 1/2 cup (120 g) Brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120 g) Unsalted butter
  1. On very low heat or using a double boiler, just melt the butter and then turn off the heat. Don’t cook and separate the butter. Just melt it.
  2. Next, add all the other ingredients to the melted butter.
  3. Stir till the brown sugar has thoroughly mixed in. Cover spiced butter batter and refrigerate.

This recipe will make about a cup (240 grams) of spiced butter batter mix, about 12 drinks. This is good on biscuits, too, and my kids love this spread on toast.

The Authenticity Of This Recipe

This is not the classic 1594 buttered beer recipe (That recipe is right here). This is my take on a buttered beer. I wanted to make this a hot buttered beer version of an 18th-century Hot Buttered Rum style. I changed the butter part to use the hot buttered rum’s spiced butter batter instead of the butter and individual spices. I also fortified the beer with a single ounce of rum to add a little strength and extra flavor to the cocktail. I took a hot buttered rum and replaced the hot water with warm beer.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Buttered Beer (Modern Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

318

kcal
ABV

7%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a fantastic contemporary buttered beer

Ingredients

Directions

  • In a saucepan over low heat, combine all the ingredients except for the rum.
  • As the buttered beer heats, gently whisk to mix the beer and butter batter.
  • Turn off the heat once the beer is lightly warmed. Simply warm the beer. Do not make it hot.
  • Pour into a pint glass, add the rum, and serve.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.