Paloma – Make This Refreshing Grapefruit Soda Cocktail

Paloma
Paloma

History Of The Paloma.

It isn’t easy to pin the Paloma down to any singular creation, and the truth is it most likely started as a simple, ubiquitous everyman’s drink. It is very uncommon to see tequila cocktails before the 1970s, except that being the margarita and a few other tiki drinks. Scanning through many Spanish, Mexican, American, and British cocktail books from 1909 to 1972, I could not find the Paloma or any grapefruit and tequila cocktail. David Wondrich points out in an article he wrote for the Daily Beast that some of the first mentions of this drink appear in the 1997 Mexican cookbook “A Cook’s Tour of Mexico” by Nancy Zaslavsky, where it is called a lazy man’s margarita and common in the town’s plaza.

The exciting takeaway from this is the drink didn’t seem to have a solid name yet (At least from what we know). This implies that this cocktail is still relatively new and, while popular with locals, has flown under the radar of those who write about Mexican food and drinks. I don’t want to assume this was the locals’ attempt at making an easy margarita. I believe they invented something unique with what was available. Structurally the Paloma is a rickey which is nothing like a margarita. The margarita falls into the sour style, so I will assume this is entirely a new drink. Obviously, with such limited information, assumptions have to be made. Still, from what I can tell, the local population was using cheap Squirt soda and limes to make cheap tequila taste better. If that history is somewhat correct, then I like that. That is the true cocktail creation story. Just a bunch of locals trying to find ways to make some bottom-shelf booze taste better, which is the origin of most of the famous old cocktails.

Dave Wondrich mentions in the article that one of the earliest places selling this cocktail with the name “Paloma” (Which means dove in Spanish) was the Tlaquepaque Restaurant in Orange County, California. Located about 20 minutes north of Disneyland (with no traffic, of course), this traditional Mexican restaurant and the local Mexican immigrant population helped bring this fantastic cocktail to California. The Paloma has since spread to the rest of the United States, but it is most popular in the southwest. As a southwest resident and someone who has been drinking since the early 2000s, I noticed the Paloma start to appear on Mexican menus around the mid to late 2000s. Today, every Mexican bar or restaurant in the city I live in has a Paloma.

Grapefruit Soda And Paloma Variations.

The oldest known way to make a Paloma is with grapefruit soda. Squirt was the first soda to be used in a Paloma, but many different brands all make excellent products. Some of the best options are:

  • Fever-Tree Pink Grapefruit
  • Jarritos Grapefruit
  • Schweppes Grapefruit
  • Fresca
  • San Pellegrino Grapefruit
  • Izze Grapefruit

The list goes on and on, but I think you get the idea. These are just some of the more common ones found at stores. So find a brand you like and go with that.

The other option for making a Paloma is to use fresh grapefruit juice. Using this method, you would substitute the 4 or 5 oz of grapefruit soda with a 1 oz grapefruit juice (Usually, white grapefruit juice is too tart in cocktails, but since there is a bit of syrup added, then white, pink, or red grapefruit works well), 1/2 oz simple syrup, and 3-4 oz soda water. Both ways are reasonable; it depends on your taste which you prefer. The soda version is sweeter, appeals more to the rum and coke crowd and the fresh grapefruit juice is much less sweet and appeals more to the sour cocktail crowd. Try both and see which you prefer. Also, keep in mind that this changes the structure of the cocktail. The soda version is structurally a rickey, and the fresh juice version is a collins. Rickey’s are a soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, and base spirit. Collins is soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, syrup, and sweetener. Ultimately, the final products of these two versions of the Paloma are similar enough, but if the structure is essential, that is something to keep in mind.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Paloma (Classic Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

214

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a classic Mexican Paloma cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 5 oz Grapefruit Soda

  • 2 Silver Tequila

Directions

  • In a highball glass with ice, combine the spirit and citrus juice.
  • Stir to combine the ingredients.
  • Top off with soda and give one last stir to combine.
  • Optional garnish of Chamoy and Tajin rim.

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Latest Articles

Coco Loco – Make This Amazing Colombian Coconut Cocktail

Coco Loco
Coco Loco

The Coco Loco

The Coco Loco is a famous beach and street stand cocktail in Colombia that has spread to other parts of the Caribbean. Now I’ve never been to Colombia and couldn’t find any old recipe books mentioning it, so everything I have learned about it I got from the all-mighty Google. It seems to be a popular beachgoer and tourist drink, each selling using a different recipe. I couldn’t find anything canon on the coco loco, and like so many Caribbean cocktails, it seems comfortable living as a pretty local drink with countless variations. The coco loco is often made right on the beach before the customer. The vendor cuts the top off a coconut, adds the ingredients with the coconut water, gives the coconut a couple of shakes, and puts a straw in the hole. Although even with all the variety, every recipe I tested includes cream of coconut, coconut water, lime juice, simple syrup, vodka, white rum, and silver tequila. So basically, I just stuck to the average of most recipes I found. I do question how old it is and can’t see it being older than the 1950s, at the most. The inclusion of vodka is odd since vodka didn’t leave Russia in large volumes till the bolshevik revolution in 1917. Furthermore, vodka didn’t become a popular cocktail spirit till the 1940s with the invention of the Moscow Mule in LA. If the Coco Loco is older, I imagine vodka was a later addition to boost the ABV to suit American taste.

Variations of the Coco Loco

From what I read, there seem to be as many recipes for the coco loco as people making it. It’s a cheap and easy-to-make cocktail for which tourists can be suckered into paying a high price. Most major Caribbean cruise ships have their recipe for it. The recipe provided here is the sum of all the recipes I could find for it in English and Spanish averaged out. Think of this as a default recipe, but go for it if you want to add something that improves it or makes it unique.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Coco Loco

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Colombian
Servings

1

servings
Calories

439

kcal
ABV

12%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Coco Loco.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Cream of Coconut

  • 2 oz Coconut Water

  • 2/3 oz Vodka

  • 2/3 oz Silver Tequila

  • 2/3 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add crushed ice to the shaker.
  • Lightly shake the drink.
  • Pour the whole contents of the shaker into the glass.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Tequila Sunrise – Make This Tasty and Simple Brunch Cocktail

Tequila Sunrise Cocktail
Tequila Sunrise Cocktail

The Tequila Sunrise was invented in the 1970s just north of San Francisco in Sausalito, California. This is a cute little drink but doesn’t mix it, or it will end up a weird unappetizing brown color. Pour the grenadine first and float the orange and tequila mix on top by slowly pouring over the back of a spoon.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Tequila Sunrise

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

405

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Tequila Sunrise.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 5 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Grenadine

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass except the grenadine.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into serving glass and gently pour in the grenadine so it settles on the bottom.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Margarita | Make The Fantastic Original 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

Margarita
Margarita

The History Of The Margarita.

This is the tequila variation of the Sidecar, and while it is heavily associated with Mexico, The oldest known recipe for it is from Britain. The Oldest known recipe is from the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book by William J. Tarling of London. The Cafe Royal has the EXACT recipe for a margarita, but it’s called the Picador and not the Margarita (Margarita is the Spanish word for a daisy flower).

I’ve heard the argument that since it’s not called the margarita, it’s not a margarita, but the recipe is precisely a margarita, and regardless of the name, the actual drink is more important. To William Tarling’s credit, the Cafe Royal was well known as a more experimental high-end bar that used exotic spirits, liqueurs, and juices. Tequila would be seen as exotic in 1930s England, and the book has not 1 but 14 different tequila recipes. I couldn’t find another cocktail book with that many tequila cocktails until the 1970s.

The first use of the name margarita comes from the December 1953 issue of Esquire Magazine. Their drink of the month section on page 76 says, “She’s from Mexico, and her name is the Margarita cocktail — She is lovely to look at, exciting and provocative.” The Esquire recipe is:

  • 1 oz Tequila
  • Dash of triple sec
  • Juice of half a lime or lemon
  • Pour over crushed ice, stir. Rub the rim of a stem glass with rind of lemon or lime, spin on salt, and sip.

Notably, Esquire was the first to add a salted rim to the cocktail, and their proportions are much sourer than the Cafe Royals.

Should I Use Margarita Mix, Sweet And Sour, Or Orange Liqueur And Citrus?

Margarita mix and Sweet and sour are the same things. The name sweet and sour is to sell the same product to people looking to make a drink other than just a margarita. The truth is they are all kind of crap. Some are better than others, but most of those cost between 25-30 USD, and at those prices, you might as well get the real stuff and buy Cointreau. Also, combining equal parts of orange liqueur and lime juice is already so easy that buying pre-mix is not beneficial.

The other consideration is which orange liqueur to buy. The market is over-saturated, and the selection is overwhelming. Cheap orange liqueur is often pretty gross, and if my option were a cheap orange liqueur or margarita mix, I would get the margarita mix. I love a deal, but orange liqueur is one of those items where you get what you pay for. Price-wise, about 20 and up, they taste pretty good. The next thing to consider is whether to get one made with an aged base spirit or not. Grand Marnier is made with an aged brandy, and Cointreau is not. Orange liqueurs made with an aged base spirit tend to be more mellow and easier to sip straight. If you like drinking cordials, then Grand Marnier would be a choice. Un-aged base spirits tend to have more robust, more crisp flavors. The orange flavor in orange liqueurs like Cointreau is rich and clean. It all comes down to your personal preferences. Cointreau mixes better in almost all cocktails and makes a fantastic margarita. It’s also the most expensive, but as I said earlier, you get what you pay for when buying orange liqueur, and the cost is typically proportional to quality.

What Is The Difference Between Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, And Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, triple sec, and curaçao are all the same products. They are all orange liqueurs. The reason for the different names is purely a marketing and product differentiation. The Dutch first started producing orange liqueur using Laraha oranges from the Caribbean island of curaçao somewhere in the 17th century. Sometime later, several French companies began producing orange liqueur too, and to make their product sound more exotic, Bols (the Dutch brand) began marketing theirs as Orange curaçao. In the 1850s, Cointreau came on to the scene and began selling their premium dry orange liqueur. Cointreau advertised that their base spirit (brandy) was filtered three times for clarity and neutrality to give their product a clean, crisp orange flavor. They called their product “Triple Sec,” which translates into English as three times dry. Cheap competitor quickly copied their branding and began calling their orange liqueurs triple sec. Cointreau later deemed the name triple sec had become chavey/tarnished and changed it back to simply orange liqueur. In an already confusing and oversaturated market, dyes were added to make one’s product stand out on the shelf next to other bottles. That is why orange liqueur goes by three different names and comes in every spectrum color.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Margarita – Original 1937 Recipe

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Margarita.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Tequila Matador – Make This Delicious 1972 Trader Vic Tiki Cocktail

Matador Cocktail
Matador Cocktail

The History Of The Matador Cocktail.

The original Matador (This is not that recipe. This recipe is the more popular trader Vic 1970s recipe) comes from the 1937 Cafe Royal Cocktail Book, a compilation of popular British cocktails in the 1930s. The book was put together by William Tarling, who did not create most of the recipes in the Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. It was well known for its use of tequila cocktails, which at the time was not a popular spirit to mix with. The original matador is a different drink made of equal parts tequila, dry vermouth, and orange liqueur.

Trader Vic’s Matador Variation.

A more contemporary take on the matador, this matador recipe is a tiki cocktail. This recipe is from the 1972 edition of Trader Vic’s Bartending Guide, and it is defiantly the more popular version of this drink. If you are looking for a new tequila recipe, then give the matador a try.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Matador

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

189

kcal
ABV

12%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Matador cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 4 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


La Water – Make This Strangely Good Green Cocktail

LA Water Cocktail
LA Water Cocktail

A friend of mine suggested I add this cocktail, and while the stuffy pretentious drinker in me turns up its nose to modern cocktails like this, the laid-back, chill me loves drinks like this. I have no idea who first made this, they are most likely still young and still alive, but I will take a wild guess and say it was first mixed somewhere in LA. The joke is that this funky-colored drink is supposed to look like tap water in Los Angeles. I get that the joke is that the water is gross and funky, but if the tap water there tasted like this, I would move to LA and never look back. No, it’s not vintage, but it’s super good.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

La Water

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a strong and tasty LA Water cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Midori

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange liqueur.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Durango Cocktail – Make Trader Vic’s Classic 1972 Orgeat Paloma

This is the same structurally as a fresh grapefruit Paloma, but it substitutes orgeat(almond) syrup for the regular simple syrup. Where the Paloma has a refreshing clean grapefruit flavor, the orgeat gives the Durango an excellent nutty and cherry-ish flavor.

I can find the earliest reference of this in Trader Vic’s 1972 revised bartending guide. The original 1947 edition did not have any tequila cocktails in it.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Durango Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

200

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Durango Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 1.5 oz Grapefruit

  • 1.5 oz Silver Tequila

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Paloma Cocktail – Make This Fantastic Fresh Grapefruit Juice Recipe

Paloma Cocktail
Paloma Cocktail

The History Of The Paloma.

It isn’t easy to pin the Paloma down to any singular creation, and the truth is it most likely started as a simple, ubiquitous everyman’s drink. It is very uncommon to see tequila cocktails before the 1970s, except that being the margarita and a few other tiki drinks. Scanning through many Spanish, Mexican, American, and British cocktail books from 1909 to 1972, I could not find the Paloma or grapefruit and tequila cocktail. David Wondrich points out in an article he wrote for the Daily Beast that some of the first mentions of this drink appear in the 1997 Mexican cookbook “A Cook’s Tour of Mexico” by Nancy Zaslavsky, where it is called a lazy man’s margarita and common in the town’s plaza.

The exciting takeaway from this is the drink didn’t seem to have a solid name yet (At least from what we know). This implies that this cocktail is still relatively new and, while popular with locals, has flown under the radar of those who write about Mexican food and drinks. I don’t want to assume this was the locals’ attempt at creating an easy margarita. I believe they invented something unique with what was available. Structurally, the Paloma is a rickey that is nothing like a margarita that is structurally a sour, so I wills is entirely a new drink assuming that the. Assumptions have to be made with such limited information, but from what I can tell, it seems the local population was using cheap Squirt soda and limes to make cheap tequila taste better. If that history is somewhat correct, then I like that. That is the true cocktail creation story. Just a bunch of locals trying to find ways to make some bottom-shelf booze taste better, which is the origin of most of the famous old cocktails.

Dave Wondrich mentions in the article that one of the earliest places selling this cocktail with the name “Paloma” (Which means dove in Spanish) was the Tlaquepaque Restaurant in Orange County, California. Located about 20 minutes north of Disneyland (with no traffic of course), this traditional Mexican restaurant, along with the local Mexican immigrant population, helped bring this wonderful cocktail to California. The Paloma has since spread to the rest of the United States, but it is most popular in the southwest. Personally, as a resident of the southwest and someone who has been drinking since the early 2000s, I definitely noticed the Paloma start to appear on Mexican menus around the mid to late 2000s. Now every Mexican bar or restaurant in the city I live in has a Paloma.

Should The Paloma Be Made With Fresh Grapefruit Or Grapefruit Soda?

Traditionally the Paloma is made with Squirt grapefruit soda, but that doesn’t mean you can’t use other grapefruit sodas or fresh grapefruit juice. A very popular Mexican soda is the Jarritos brand. They make tons of different flavored sodas (tamarind is the best, I remember buying these and all the fun chamoy candies from the ice cream man as a kid.), but Jarritos makes a delicious grapefruit soda that you may want to try. Also, if you can, buy Mexican Squirt or just Mexican soda in general. Almost all sodas made in Mexico are made with natural cane sugar and taste noticeably better than American-made sodas. The reason for this, and why the most added sweetener in the US is corn syrup, is America has a high import tax on sugar to protect grain farmers. It is financially challenging to use natural sugar in conjunction with grain subsidies. Today, most local supermarkets have a “boutique” soda section that stocks Mexican-made sodas, so buy one of those if you can.

The second option for making a Paloma is to use fresh grapefruit juice. Using this method, you would substitute the 4 or 5 oz of grapefruit soda with a 1 oz grapefruit juice (Usually, white grapefruit juice is too tart in cocktails, but since there is a bit of syrup added, then white, pink, or red grapefruit works well), 1/2 oz simple syrup, and 3-4 oz soda water. Both ways are reasonable; it depends on your taste which you prefer. The soda version is sweeter, appeals more to the rum and coke crowd and the fresh grapefruit juice is much less sweet and appeals more to the sour cocktail crowd. Try both and see which you prefer. Also, keep in mind that this changes the structure of the cocktail. The soda version is structurally a rickey, and the fresh juice version is a collins. Rickey’s are a soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, and base spirit. Collins is soda (sweetness is not a variable for the soda), citrus juice, syrup, and sweetener. Ultimately, the final products of these two versions of the Paloma are similar enough, but if the structure is essential, that is something to keep in mind.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Paloma Cocktail (Fresh Grapefruit)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

294

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a fresh grapefruit paloma.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2.5 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 2.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Bloody Maria – Make A Tasty Tequila Variation Of A Bloody Mary

Bloody Maria Cocktail
Bloody Maria Cocktail

This is the tequila variation of the Bloody Mary, and I will apologize in advance for this, but I’m not the biggest fan of Bloody Marys. I only like the ones I make. Therefore I am keeping this strictly historical. I have no idea what the origin of this specific cocktail is, nor was I able to find anything solidly historic in books or online.

The story of the original Bloody Mary goes that it was invented in the 1920s by Fernand Petiot, a French bartender working at The New York Bar in Paris, France. The bar was later renamed Harry’s New York Bar after Harry MacElhone bought it. Fernand came up with the cocktail as a hair of the dog drink to cure hangovers, and the popular myth states it was none other than the famous drunk Ernest Hemingway who first ordered it. While that is likely not true, it’s still fun to imagine.

After prohibition ended, Fernand Petiot immigrated to New York in the 1930s and served his signature cocktail at The King Cole Bar in the St. Regis Hotel. The Bloody Mary was still just tomato juice and vodka in France, but upper-class New Yorkers were not impressed and found the drink too two-dimensional and tomato-y. He was asked to spice it up a bit. English being his second language, he took it quite literally. He added hot sauce, salt and pepper, and Worcestershire sauce. The hot and spiced-up remake was a hit. The very fancy St. Regis Hotel found Bloody Mary’s name to be too vulgar for its wealthier/stuffier guest and tried to change the name to The Red Snapper, but it was too late. The cocktail had expanded beyond its walls, and the public continued to call it the Bloody Mary. The Bloody Maria is a Mexican variation of that drink. In this, you are substituting vodka for tequila and Tabasco for a Mexican hot sauce. So spice it up and go wild.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Bloody Maria

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an amazing Bloody Maria.

Ingredients

  • To taste Horse Radish

  • To taste Salt

  • To taste Black Pepper

  • To taste Worcestershire sauce

  • To taste Hot Sauce

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 5 oz

  • Tomato Juice
  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass filled with ice.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Adios Motherfucker – Make The Best AMF You Will Ever Have

Adios Motherfucker Cocktail
Adios Motherfucker Cocktail

Is The AMF a Trashy Drink?

I know the name of this is Vintage American Cocktails and that this is not a vintage cocktail, but who cares. The truth is it’s a pretty good cocktail, and contrary to popular belief, it’s not that boozy. Or, if made correctly, it shouldn’t be. This cocktail has a reputation, similar to the Cosmopolitan, for being a trashy club drink young people like to order so they can say they got an Adios Motherfucker. Unfortunately, because of this connection, it’s suffered the same fate as the Cosmopolitan; A good cocktail that ordinary people are afraid to order to avoid looking trashy. Granted, its name is Adios MotherFucker, so it was destined to end up with that image. Another name is the AMF, but saying Motherfucker is a lot more fun.

The most recipe calls for sweet and sour, but the sweet and sour mix is a poor imitation of orange liqueur, sugar, and lemon juice. This version of the Adios has all the same per proportions as a more standard recipe, but by replacing the sweet and sour mix and sprite with better ingredients, you get something much better. This is an excellent version of the adios.

Adios MotherFucker Vs Long Island Ice Tea.

It’s similar to the Long Island Ice Tea in that it has almost every different kind of spirit in it. Unlike the long island, they are in small quantities, and if you’re going by ABV and structure, it’s actually more similar to a John Collins than the Long Island Ice Tea.

What is the Difference Between Cointreau, Orange Liqueur, and Blue Curacao?

Cointreau and Curacao or blue curaçao are all the same liqueur. The only difference is that Cointreau is a brand name, and Blue curaçao is a general term for an orange liqueur with added blue food dye. They are all orange liqueurs and the difference between them and other orange liqueurs like triple sec all comes down to brand names and marketing gimmicks. Bols was the first to manufacture orange liqueur using the bitter oranges from the island of Curacao, owned in the Caribbean. As orange liqueur grew in popularity in Europe, other manufacturers entered the scene. Cointreau marketed theirs as being made from a triple distilled dry beet sugar spirit base, providing a more bright, clean, orange taste. They called it Cointreau triple sec. They owned the name Cointreau but not triple sec, and soon many cheap orange liqueurs flooded the market as “triple sec” liqueurs. Some branded themselves as a “Curacao” liqueur, and others began adding bright-colored food dyes to make them stand out from the others. Cointreau eventually dropped the headline triple sec from its marketing since the term was now associated with cheaper products, but the term endures. That is a brief history of how the market became flooded with triple secs, curacaos, colored curacaos, Cointreaus, etc., that are ultimately the same ingredient but cause so much confusion for so many people. For a more in-depth history of Orange liqueur, please download my app and navigate to the orange liqueur ingredient description. links at the bottom of this page

What Does The AMF Taste Like?

The Adios Motherfucker is a great cocktail. Its taste is similar to a Collins-style cocktail, and the bright blue color is fun. Even though it has the same spirits as the Long Island Ice Tea, it tastes nothing like a Long Island. The Adios has almost a boozy sparkling lemonade taste. The sweetness and soda water helps cut the drink to a more manageable alcohol level and make it (I think) a refreshing cocktail that will still give you a slight buzz.

The Most Important ingredient.

There is no ingredient in the Adios that affects the flavor in any meaningful way. There are so many different ingredients in such small amounts that they all get lost. The only advice I have for this cocktail is not to buy Blue orange liqueur but use one drop of blue food dye instead. Unless you plan to make tons of these quickly, your best bet is to buy a normal clear orange liqueur like Cointreau and add blue dye. Because if you buy blue orange liqueur, you will be trapped into only being able to use it for this and maybe a couple of other cocktails. I have a bottle of blue curacao that I bought maybe 4 or 5 years ago, and it’s still half full.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Adios Motherfucker

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

311

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

The best Adios Motherfucker that actually taste great.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz  Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Vodka

  • 1/2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1/2 oz Silver Tequila

  • 1/2 oz White Rum

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • If you do not have blue orange liqueur then add 1 drop of blue food dye
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass and gently add the soda water.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.