Raspberry Simple Syrup – Easy & Flavorful Recipe

Raspberry Syrup

Raspberry Syrup

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

10

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

20

minutes

A Simple and delicious raspberry syrup recipe for drinks.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Sugar

  • 5 oz Water

  • 5 oz Raspberries

  • Optional Ingredients
  • 1/2 tsp Raspberry Extract

  • 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar (Tartaric Acid)

Directions

  • Over low heat combine the water and sugar together and stir till the sugar is dissolved.
  • Add the raspberries and smash them into hot syrup and let the mixture simmer for 5 – 10 minutes.
  • Filter the syrup through a mesh strainer and press the juice out of the raspberries. While the syrup is still warm add the cream of tartar, and once the syrup has cooled ad the raspberry extract. Bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.

Recipe Video

The History Of Raspberry Syrup For Cocktails.

Raspberry syrup is one of the oldest red fruit syrups for cocktails. Raspberry syrup, along with strawberry syrup, was being used regularly when the first actual cocktail book, Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders guide, was published in 1862. Raspberry syrup stayed a popular cocktail syrup in the United States till about the 1910s, when grenadine, pomegranate syrup, took over much of its role. Grenadine, or Rob-e-anar as it is called in Persian, made its way through Europe during the later part of the 1800s from Persia, where it is an ingredient in some traditional dishes. Raspberry syrup still retained some users in America, but grenadine became very popular in Europe and replaced raspberry syrup in many recipes. Comparing cocktails recipes between the US, England, and France shows how the European versions changed. The clover club in the United States calls for raspberry syrup, but they use grenadine in the Savoy cocktail book. Same for the rose, and in the East India cocktail, all syrup is removed entirely. A few new recipes that came out after the 1910s used raspberry syrup but its importance and prevalence were greatly diminished.

Should I Buy Raspberry Syrup Or Make It At Home?

Always make your own syrups unless it’s gum syrup, tonic syrup, or orgeat. Gum and orgeat you can make; it is just a pain in the butt and tonic I would never make from scratch. Raspberry simple syrup is super easy to make, is cheap to make too, results in a much better product, and is hard to find. You can find it as a syrup for waffles and such, but those do not taste that good and are too thick.

This is super easy to make and takes no more than 10 minutes. Simmer 2 cups (240g) of sugar, 1 cup (120mls) of water, and 1 cup (120g) of raspberries together for 10 minutes, strain, and you’re done!

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Rose Cocktail No.1 – Recipe

Rose Cocktail (American Version)

Rose No.1 (Raspberry Syrup)

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Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

156

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Rose No.1 cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp

  • Raspberry Syrup
  • 1 oz

  • Kirschwasser
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Vermouth

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Recipe Video

Notes

What Does Rose Cocktail Made With Raspberry Syrup Taste Like?

There are three main versions of the Rose cocktail, and the raspberry version is my favorite. I like dry vermouth cocktails more and more as I get older, and the subtle fruity sweetness the raspberry syrup adds to the herbaceous vermouth makes this an outstanding cocktail. Kirsch also adds a nice strength to the drink, and the three ingredients balance out very well.

Other Versions Of The Rose

There are three standard versions of the Rose, each with a different syrup to provide a beautiful light red color. One recipe uses raspberry syrup, another uses currant syrup, and the third uses grenadine. The recipe that uses raspberry syrup comes from Frank Meier’s 1936 book “The Artistry of Mixing Drinks.” Meier credits the Rose cocktail to Johnny Mitta of the Chatham Bar in Paris, France. Funny enough, the recipe that uses currant syrup also credits the recipe to Johnny Mitta. That recipe is recorded in Harry McElhone’s first book, “Harry of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing,” from 1923. McElhone and Meier were both very skilled bartenders, so it’s doubtful they got the recipes wrong. Perhaps Mitta changed his recipe over time, and the currant syrup recipe is simply the older version Mitta served. Who knows.

To complicate the matter even more, the 1922 book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them” by Robert Vemeire credits the creation of the Rose to Sidney Knight of the Hotel Cecil in London and his recipe uses grenadine. All three are dry vermouth cocktails but none are alike, and who knows if it was Johnny Mitta or Sidney Knight who invented this cocktail. In David Embury’s 1948 book “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks” he even provides four different recipes for the rose and credits Mitta for creating the drink, but then he mentions a third person named Albert as a creator too. He then says that the Sidney Knight recipe is American, which Vemeire said 20 years earlier was instead invented in London. If the famous bartenders of that time couldn’t figure it out, then we sure won’t.

Recipe Resources

Unfortunately I don’t have a free link to the 1922 book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them” by Robert Vemeire or the 1948 edition of Embury’s book, but the 1961 edition is the same.

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East India Cocktail – Classic Recipe & History

East India Cocktail

East India Cocktail

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

232

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1882 East India Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

Featured Video

This is cocktail #175 in Harry Johnson’s 1882 print of the Bartenders Manual. Harry Johnson was a German-born (Specifically Prussian-born, A unified Germany didn’t exist yet) bartender and peered at Jerry Thomas. Jerry Thomas does steal a lot of Harry Johnson’s thunder since he was the first one to be published, but both created amazing recipes. Since Harry Johnson was german-born, his books are written in English and German.

Recipe Resources

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Clover Club – Original Recipe & History

Clover Club Cocktail

Clover Club

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Clover Club cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Clover Club Cocktail

The Clover Club cocktail was the signature cocktail of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel’s Clover Club in Philadelphia. The Clover Club men’s club was in operation from the early 1880s to the beginning of prohibition in 1920. The oldest and most commonly used recipe I found of the Clover Club cocktail is from the 1917 book The Ideal Bartender by Tom Bullock. The recipe in that book is “Fill large bar glass 1/2 full fine Ice. 1/2 pony Raspberry syrup. 1/2 jigger dry gin. 1/2 jigger French vermouth. White of 1 egg. Shake well; strain into a cocktail glass and serve.” That more or less translates to 15mls raspberry, 20mls gin, 20mls vermouth, and 30 mLs egg white. There is an older one from the 1916 book “Jack’s Manual” by Jack A. Grohusko, but it seems a bit odd. It has the trademark raspberry syrup, but it’s primarily orange juice and citrus with gin and mint. I mention it for knowledge’s sake, but I wouldn’t consider it canon.

I found online that Dave Wondrich found an older printing of it from the 1909 Drinks – How to mix and serve by Paul Lowe. I did my best to look that one up, but I couldn’t personally find it anywhere. I found a picture of the book’s cover but not the recipe, and copies sell for around 300 clams. So I’m not buying that to verify this short entry.

Like the Rose cocktail, common variations of the Clover Club use grenadine or currant syrup instead of Raspberry, but Raspberry is the preferred choice. No one knows what the original Clover Club’s version of its house drink was. We have a few old, pretty good guesses. The recipe I have listed is my best guess at smashing together some of the old guesses while keeping with how other old drinks similar to the clover club were made. Another common way to make it is with 60 mls gin instead of 30 gin and 30 dry vermouth. As I get older, I’m starting to like dry vermouth more and more and slightly prefer the clover club with both; younger, but when I was, I wouldn’t say I liked dry vermouth and liked the straight gin one better. So really, it’s up to what you prefer or have on hand, but both are good ways to make it.

How To Get Great Foam On Cocktails With Egg Whites.

Egg Whites are challenging to get right in cocktails. Everyone struggles with them at some point, and bartenders search for any way to make whipping them into s fluffy meringue easier. Henry Ramos hired “shaker boys” to shake for him. Some use the dry shake or reverse dry shake, others swear by only using one large ice cube, and some say you have to shake till your arms fall off. The method I like is called the Saxe Shake, and De Forest Saxe invented it in the 1880s.

The Saxe Shake is largely unknown in the cocktail world because De Forest Saxe was a soda fountain operator in Chicago, Illinois. His 1890 book “Saxe’s New Guide Hints to Soda Water Dispensers” details his shaking technique for egg drinks that produces the best foam and can be accomplished with minimal effort. Saxe states to shake drinks with eggs with only one chestnut-sized ice cube. An Ice cube from a standard ice tray is about chestnut-sized, so one or two small cubes will work. Then shake until the ice fully melts, and pour into the serving glass without straining. The small amount of ice is just enough to cool and dilute the drink, and since there are no remaining bits of ice left in the shaker, there is nothing to strain. Passing the mixture through a strainer destroys most of the bubbles you worked so hard to make. As you add soda water, the escaping carbon dioxide fills the tiny bubbles in the drink, forcing them to expand and form a large fluffy foam. Give it a try. Using the Saxe Shake, I have turned out Ramos Gin Fizzes as fast and efficiently as any other shaken cocktail with excellent results.

Recipe Resources

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Blinker – Original Recipe

Blinker

Blinker Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Blinker cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

First popping up in the 1930s, this little whiskey cocktail is refreshing. A popular substitute for grenadine in this cocktail is regular old raspberry syrup, as you would find in the pancake section of a grocery store. If you don’t have raspberry syrup, you can use grenadine, but that’s up to you.

Recipe Resources

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