Raspberry Simple Syrup – Easy & Fresh Recipe

Raspberry Syrup
Raspberry Syrup

The History Of Raspberry Syrup For Cocktails.

Raspberry syrup is one of the oldest red fruit syrups for cocktails. Raspberry syrup, along with strawberry syrup, was being used regularly when the first actual cocktail book, Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders guide, was published in 1862. Raspberry syrup stayed a popular cocktail syrup in the United States till about the 1910s, when grenadine, pomegranate syrup, took over much of its role. Grenadine, or Rob-e-anar as it is called in Persian, made its way through Europe during the later part of the 1800s from Persia, where it is an ingredient in some traditional dishes. Raspberry syrup still retained some users in America, but grenadine became very popular in Europe and replaced raspberry syrup in many recipes. Comparing cocktails recipes between the US, England, and France shows how the European versions changed. The clover club in the United States calls for raspberry syrup, but they use grenadine in the Savoy cocktail book. Same for the rose, and in the East India cocktail, all syrup is removed entirely. A few new recipes that came out after the 1910s used raspberry syrup but its importance and prevalence were greatly diminished.

Should I Buy Raspberry Syrup Or Make It At Home?

Always make your own syrups unless it’s gum syrup, tonic syrup, or orgeat. Gum and orgeat you can make; it is just a pain in the butt and tonic I would never make from scratch. Raspberry simple syrup is super easy to make, is cheap to make too, results in a much better product, and is hard to find. You can find it as a syrup for waffles and such, but those do not taste that good and are too thick.

This is super easy to make and takes no more than 10 minutes. Simmer 2 cups (240g) of sugar, 1 cup (120mls) of water, and 1 cup (120g) of raspberries together for 10 minutes, strain, and you’re done!

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Raspberry Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

10

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

20

minutes

A Simple and delicious raspberry syrup recipe for drinks.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Sugar

  • 5 oz Water

  • 5 oz Raspberries

  • Optional Ingredients
  • 1/2 tsp Raspberry Extract

  • 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar (Tartaric Acid)

Directions

  • Over low heat combine the water and sugar together and stir till the sugar is dissolved.
  • Add the raspberries and smash them into hot syrup and let the mixture simmer for 5 – 10 minutes.
  • Filter the syrup through a mesh strainer and press the juice out of the raspberries. While the syrup is still warm add the cream of tartar, and once the syrup has cooled ad the raspberry extract. Bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.

Recipe Video

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Cocktails That Use Raspberry Syrup

Rose – Make This Wonderful Raspberry Syrup Rose Cocktail

Rose Cocktail (American Version)
Rose Cocktail (American Version)

So I won’t lie; I don’t have any objective, concrete evidence to point to this being the American version of the Rose recipe. Honestly, the recipe for this cocktail is all over the place. Older books cite just the French and English versions, and later ones add the American version. The recipes are current, grenadine (pomegranate), cherry, and raspberry. So here is an explanation of why I broke the three up the way I did:

• Older books only mention the French or English version and they only mention currant or grenadine as the sweetener.
• I don’t see raspberry pop up until folks start mentioning an American version.
• Of the older books that mention the French and English versions, the French one is often associated with currant.

With that information, I figured my best bet was to associate French with currant, English with grenadine, and American with raspberry. Not to say I am right, but with all the time I have invested in figuring this out, this is the best I could come up with.

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Rose (Raspberry Version)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

156

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Rose cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp

  • Raspberry Syrup
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Kirschwasser

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Recipe Video

Notes

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East India Cocktail – Classic 1882 Harry Johnson Recipe

East India Cocktail
East India Cocktail

This is cocktail #175 in Harry Johnson’s 1882 print of the Bartenders Manual. Harry Johnson was a German-born (Specifically Prussian-born, A unified Germany didn’t exist yet) bartender and peered at Jerry Thomas. Jerry Thomas does steal a lot of Harry Johnson’s thunder since he was the first one to be published, but both created amazing recipes. Since Harry Johnson was german-born, his books are written in English and German.

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East India Cocktail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

232

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic 1882 East India Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

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Clover Club – Original Recipe & History

Clover Club Cocktail
Clover Club Cocktail

The Clover Club cocktail was the signature cocktail of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel’s Clover Club in Philadelphia. The Clover Club men’s club was in operation from the early 1880s to the beginning of prohibition in 1920. The first printing I was able to find of the Clover Club cocktail is from the 1917 book The Ideal Bartender by Tom Bullock. The recipe in that book is “Fill large bar glass 1/2 full fine Ice. 1/2 pony Raspberry syrup. 1/2 jigger dry gin. 1/2 jigger French vermouth. White of 1 egg. Shake well; strain into a cocktail glass and serve.” That more or less translates to 15mls raspberry, 20mls gin, 20mls vermouth, and 30 mls egg white.

I found online that Dave Wondrich found an older printing of it from the 1909 Drinks – How to mix and serve by Paul Lowe. I did my best to look that one up, but I couldn’t personally find it anywhere. I found a picture of the book’s cover but not the recipe, and copies sell for around 300 clams. So I’m not buying that to verify this short entry.

Like the Rose cocktail, common variations of the Clover Club use grenadine or currant syrup instead of Raspberry, but Raspberry is the preferred choice. No one knows what the original Clover Club’s version of its house drink was. We have a few old, pretty good guesses. The recipe I have listed is my best guess at smashing together some of the old guesses while keeping with how other old drinks similar to the clover club were made. Another common way to make it is with 60 mls gin instead of 30 gin and 30 dry vermouth. As I get older, I’m starting to like dry vermouth more and more and slightly prefer the clover club with both; younger, but when I was, I wouldn’t say I liked dry vermouth and liked the straight gin one better. So really, it’s up to what you prefer or have on hand, but both are good ways to make it.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Clover Club

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Clover Club cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Blinker – Make The Original 1948 David Embury Recipe

Blinker
Blinker

First popping up in the 1930s, this little whiskey cocktail is refreshing. A popular substitute for grenadine in this cocktail is regular old raspberry syrup, as you would find in the pancake section of a grocery store. If you don’t have raspberry syrup, you can use grenadine, but that’s up to you.

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Blinker Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Blinker cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.