Whiskey Fizz – A Luxurious and Velvety Whiskey Sour

Whiskey Fizz
Whiskey Fizz

The History Of The Whiskey Fizz.

First appearing in the 1887 edition of the Bartenders Guide by Jerry Thomas, the whiskey fizz is a fantastic cocktail. A combination of a whiskey sour with egg whites and a whiskey daisy, the whiskey fizz is both lights, airy and refreshing.

What Does The Whiskey Fizz Taste Like?

The taste of a whiskey fizz is like a mousse whiskey sour. Incredible, and the texture feels like the first few sips of a tap served Guinness. The egg foam gives a velvet texture similar to nitrogen bubbles, but the soda water adds a refreshing carbonated beverage feel. I believe the tongue cannot distinguish bubbles below 30 microns, which gives a fine egg foam a velvety texture in cocktails. Above 30 microns, bubbles have a more refreshing texture, which the soda water provides to the cocktail. Combine those with a classic whiskey sour, and you have one of the best-tasting cocktails.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Whiskey Fizz

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

13%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Whiskey Fizz.1

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when it is not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation.

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Whiskey Daisy – Make The Original 1862 Jerry Thomas Recipe

Whiskey Daisy
Whiskey Daisy

The History Of The Daisy Style Cocktail.

The daisy was another early cocktail style emerging around the same time as the crusta and many other early standard sour cocktails. The Daisy is essentially a crusta with an ounce of soda water to cut the intensity and make the cocktail more refreshing. First appearing in the 1862 edition of the bartender’s guide by Jerry Thomas, The daisy is a beautiful cocktail if you find the standard sour is too strong.

What Does The Whiskey Daisy Taste Like?

The Whiskey Daisy is a beautiful little cocktail that adds a bit of refreshing soda water to a delicious sour cocktail. The small amount of Orgeat adds a lovely almond and cherry taste while the bourbon still shines through as the primary flavor of this cocktail.

The Right Ingredients To Use For This Cocktails.

The most essential ingredient in this cocktail is the orgeat and the kind of whiskey you use. Unlike most cocktails, this one benefits from a nicer bourbon as none of the other ingredients are made to overshadow the base spirit. The subtleties of a nicer whiskey still shine through, so medium-grade bourbon ends up making for a better product. The orgeat is another essential ingredient that adds a faint note of almond and cherry to the cocktail. The issue is cheaper orgeats taste like sweet almond milk and lack the bitter almond cherry flavor of genuine orgeat syrup. If you have a bottle of almond baking extract in your pantry, give that a taste, and you will know what orgeat should taste like. The orgeat is what separates this cocktail from tasting like a standard whiskey sour with soda water.

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Whiskey Daisy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

161

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Whiskey Daisy.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2 dashes Orgeat

  • 3 dashes Gum Syrup

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 1.5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker except for the soda water. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards
  • Gently add the soda water

Notes


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Eggnog – Amazing And Simple Traditional 1862 Recipe

Egg Nog Cocktail
Egg Nog Cocktail

Some Variations On Eggnog.

There are countless eggnog recipes, and they all range from thick custard-like dairy drinks to non-alcoholic almond milk drinks and from really good store-bought to bad store-bought. A typical grocery store may sell well over a dozen different eggnogs during the holiday season. Although, you can have fun with eggnog when it’s homemade. Common homemade variations of eggnog are:

  1. Traditional no-cook eggnog. Like this recipe, most of your traditional eggnogs are not cooked but either shaken or beaten and drank right there or stored in the fridge for several days to develop more flavor.
  2. Modern cooked eggnog. Eggnogs started to get cooked due to the worry of food poisoning from consuming raw eggs. These tend to be very thick and custard-like and are the majority of most recipes today.
  3. Dairy-free eggnog. Typically made for lactose intolerance, these will replace the dairy with either coconut milk, almond milk, soy milk, oat milk, or other alternative milk. They also usually don’t have eggs, and most are also vegan.
  4. Egg-free eggnog. They are typically made for allergies, dietary, or just because some folks are grossed out by drinking eggs. Egg-free eggnogs exclude the eggs altogether and use heavy cream to provide a thicker texture.
  5. Vegan eggnog. Made for dietary and lifestyle choices, most of your dairy-free egg nogs are also vegan.
  6. Alcohol-free eggnog. Almost all store-bought eggnogs are alcohol-free unless bought at a liquor store. Typically purchased for their convenience, the option of adding alcohol or not, children can join in.

I love eggnog and have drank a ton of everything listed above. That being said, this 1862 Jerry Thomas recipe is the best eggnog I have ever had. THE BEST. This is not a sweet and thick recipe; it tastes like a slightly thicker milk punch. This recipe is ripped right from the 1862 Bartender’s guide. The only change I made was the addition of vanilla extract, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The original recipe did not have those ingredients, but I added them because they make the drink taste better and more in line with what someone expects eggnog to taste. This recipe is outstanding because it tastes exactly like you would expect eggnog to taste, but the texture is thinner and more like a standard cocktail. It may sound gross to crack an egg into your shaker, shake it up and drink it, but you will be blown away once you try this eggnog. Keep in mind that these are the original recipes that made eggnog famous.

Is Eggnog Cooked Or Not?

Most eggnogs are cooked at low heat, refrigerated for a few days, and taste like custard or melted ice cream. This is done to ensure that all the germs are killed that could potentially cause food poisoning and because most people are super grossed out at the idea of drinking a raw egg. Cooking also adds quite a bit of time to making eggnog, and it can be challenging to prevent clumping from the egg whites cooking hence why most buy it these days. Although if you add thickened cornstarch to the eggs before cooking prevents the egg whites from forming large cooked groups. Most recipes say the cornstarch adds thickness, but it prevents the proteins from forming large bonds and making the eggnog chunky.

This is not that kind of recipe. This one is fast and easy to make. No cooking, just a bunch of shaking. Most of the ancient recipes I found are not the cooked custard kinds but recipes like this one. You can let this drink sit in the fridge for a few days to develop more flavor or drink it right away.

As a word of warning, use pasteurized eggs if you can. Pasteurized eggs are still raw like a regular egg but with all the germs killed off. Pasteurized eggs don’t make big foamy egg white heads like non-pasteurized eggs do, but you can be sure they won’t get you sick. The FDA guesstimates that 1 in every 40,000 eggs has salmonella, which is super rare. Pasteurized eggs are hard to find, so you can pasteurize them yourself or roll the dice. If you have one of those fancy sous vide devices. As someone who has had Salmonella poisoning before, without going into detail, I will say it is one of the most painful things I have ever experienced. Again 1 in every 40,000. So rare, and if you get Salmonella, you’re much more likely to get it the same way I did by eating contaminated food prepared by someone who didn’t wash their hands. I’ve eaten countless raw eggs and have never gotten sick from eggs once.

The History Of Eggnog.

There is no definitive answer to where eggnog came from. Many guess it is a descendant of a medieval drink called posset, a milk and beer drink that would sometimes have an egg added for extra creaminess and flavor. The Oxford English Dictionary canonized the word nog in the late 1600s to mean a strong ale. It was probably used by the general population much earlier than that, but that’s when it was officially recorded. The first use of the word Eggnog started popping up in the United States in the late 1700s. England had a similar drink, but it was called an Egg Flip. Over time it became linked to Christmas and is not made much outside of the winter holiday season.

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Eggnog

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

584

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Eggnog.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Vanilla Extract

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 6 oz Half u0026 Half

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Simply combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards and garnish with ground nutmeg.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Whiskey Julep – Make A Delicious Classic 1862 Julep

Whiskey Julep
Whiskey Julep

The History of Julep Cocktails And Their Ancient Origins.

The history of the Julep goes back to ancient Persia (modern-day Iran). Rosewater was thought to have health benefits, and the word for rosewater in old Persian is Gulab (gul=rose, ab=water). Gulab slowly made its way to the surrounding Arabic cultures, and over time, the word Gulab changed to Julāb, and it was used to describe any sweetened medicinal syrup. Julābs eventually traveled to western Europe and England; syrupy medicines are called Julaps or Julapums. By the mid-1700s, there were all kinds of julaps. Rosewater julap was called Julapum Rosatum and was used for treating Heart issues. Julapum tabaci was a tobacco-infused syrup for treating asthma, Julapum sedativum was opium syrup Julapum Stomachicum was a mint-infused syrup used to settle upset tummies. I found many kinds of other Julapums, but this is good enough. Also, most of what I found was written in Latin, and google translate can only do so much. A medical journal I found online from the 1750s calls for a Julapum Stomachicum to be a peppermint-infused sweetener mixed with sherry. What we today consider a mint julep emerges around the early 1800s. The British 1827 home medical book Oxford Night Caps refers to a mint julap as a mint syrup mixed with brandy that a parent can make to ease the upset tummy.

With its unique drinking culture, the mint julep took on a different identity in the United States. Mint juleps were dressed up and made fancy for saloon patrons looking to get buzzed. The oldest printed recipe for this saloon-style julep comes from Jerry Thomas’s 1862 edition of The Bar Tenders Guide. The formula is one table-spoonful of white pulverized sugar. And 2 1/2 tablespoonfuls of water and mix well with a spoon. 3 or 4 sprigs of fresh mint. 1 1/2 wine glass Cognac brandy, dash with Jamaica rum, and sprinkle white sugar on top. Jerry Thomas also has recipes for a gin julep, whiskey julep, a pineapple julep, pineapple syrup, and gin cocktail.

The mint julep stays a brandy cocktail for a very long time, and most bartenders and recipe books copy Jerry Thomas till around the late 1800s. Books in the late 1880s mention how the once-loved julep had fallen in favor of other more complex cocktails and is typically something only the older men order. Around this time, the mint julep recipe replaces brandy for bourbon. The first instance of this is in the 1888 book Bartender’s Manual by Theodore Proulx, where he has his recipe for a mint julep that uses bourbon instead of brandy. Whether this change is accidental or intentional, it would happen when the cocktail begins to fade from the bartender’s repertoire. As decades passed, the mint julep and whiskey julep merged till it just became standard to make a mint julep with whiskey.

Variations Of The Mint Julep.

This specific version is the whiskey julep variation of the mint julep. Had you ordered a mint julep in the 1800s, you would be given a brandy cocktail instead, but the whiskey variation is the most common one made today. All the other variations of the mint julep are almost entirely forgotten today, and almost everyone only knows of the mint julep. Jerry Thomas had recipes for a gin julep, whiskey Julep, pineapple julep, and a plain brandy julep. Harry Johnson added the Champagne Julep too in his 1882 book Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual. An 1885 book called New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef by Bacchus has nine different Julep recipes. They are not worth listing here as they are all quite lousy.

Getting The Ice Right In A Julep.

I feel the most essential part of any julep is the crushed or shaved ice you will pack the cup with. This cocktail should have the spirit of a snow cone that tastes sweet of mint and booze, and the ice should be rounded over the rim. Otherwise, it comes across as old-fashioned if you don’t pack the cup with ice, and the julep should be more of a refreshing hot daytime summer drink and not a smoky old nighttime bar drink.

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Whiskey Julep

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

211

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic whiskey julep. Often mistaken for a mint julep, which traditionally uses brandy as its base, the whiskey julep is an amazing cocktail. This recipe dates from the 1862 edition of the Bartenders guide by Jerry Thomas.

Ingredients

  • 5

  • Mint Leaves
  • 1/2 oz

  • Simple Syrup
  • 2 oz

  • Bourbon
  • 2 dashes

  • Gold Rum

Directions

  • Add the simple syrup and mint to a mixing glass.
  • Press the mint leaves into the syrup to infuse it with the mint’s flavor.
  • Fill the mixing glass with ice and add the base spirit.
  • Mix the drink for 20 – 30 seconds.
  • Fill your serving glass with crushed ice and strain the drink into the serving glass.
  • Garnish with a bouquet of mint and dust with powdered sugar.

Recipe Video

Notes


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Whiskey Cocktail – The Fantastic Original Old Fashioned

Whiskey Cocktail
Whiskey Cocktail

The History Of The Whiskey Cocktail.

Before people started calling this an Old Fashioned, it was just a Whiskey Cocktail. Prohibition brought about a massive paradigm shift in the way cocktails were made. Before the ratification of the 18th amendment and the start of prohibition, lightly flavored, high-quality spirits were popular among many drinkers. You can identify these vintage-style American cocktails by a couple of ounces of a base spirit lightly flavored with no more than 2 or 3 dashes of other flavorful ingredients and just enough sweetness to cut the spirit’s burn. With the start of prohibition in 1917, the quality of most liquor greatly diminished, high-quality spirits were priced out of most people’s range, and most trained bartenders left the profession and got jobs that were not illicit. Suddenly overnight, there was a loss of quality products and knowledge. The cocktails that gained in popularity were the highball and sour style cocktails. Not to say they didn’t exist before this but prohibition had made them more popular. Highballs and sours were slightly easier to make and had more significant amounts of strong-flavored ingredients that helped mask the taste of poor quality spirits. The epitome of this is the tiki drink, which was created during prohibition and saw the first tiki bar open in Hollywood, CA, in 1933, immediately once prohibition ended. If an older individual wanted to order a whiskey cocktail like they remembered having before prohibition, they would need to ask for a whiskey cocktail made in the old fashion. Keep in mind that prohibition lasted for 16 years. A person turning 21 in 1917 was now 37. An entire drinking generation had grown up not having access to this kind of cocktail.

Before prohibition, the bitter used in this classic cocktail was Boker’s Bitters. Unfortunately, the company that manufactured Boker’s Bitters was already on hard times in the early 1910s, and with the start of prohibition, they closed their doors forever. Those that knew the recipe ended up taking it to their graves. Angostura Bitters ended up replacing Boker’s since people could not get this classic ingredient or even find people who knew what it was made of. Oddly enough, a bottle of Boker’s Bitters was found in the 2000s in a deceased man’s attic, and the very old tincture was reverse-engineered. It was primarily a primarily Cardamom bitter with other citrus and spices flavors. Since this discovery, Cardamom bitters made in the Boker’s style have started popping up on store shelving.

The other lost ingredient was gum syrup which was replaced with standard simple syrup. It’s not that gum arabic disappeared, but gum syrup is difficult to make and can take quite a while to emulsify fully. Untrained prohibition-era bartenders didn’t have the skill or patience to make an ingredient that most speakeasy drinkers didn’t even want.

What Does The Whiskey Cocktail Taste Like?

The classic whiskey cocktail still taste strongly of bourbon and has very forward caramel and oak flavors, but the bitters add almost an Indian spice to it. The boker’s style bitters add a cardamom, cinnamon, herbal, citrus flavor that taste very much like traditional spices for Indian food. The small amount of gum syrup thickens the consistency giving the drink a velvet full body. the body is similar to that of a red wine. To me it’s completely different from a modern old fashion. I can see reasons for preferring one over the other as they are very different from each other and both are an acquired taste.

Make Sure To Use The Right Bitters.

The cardamom bitters are the most essential ingredient in a pre-prohibition-style whiskey cocktail. This one ingredient completely changes the direction of the drink. Angostura has a dark heavy, spicy, bark, earthy flavor, but broker’s style cardamom bitters are bright and fragrant with Indian spices and citrus flavors. The Gum syrup does play a nice role in changing the body to more of a milky full-body red, but regular simple syrup will still work fine, but the bitters define this cocktail.

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Whiskey Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the classic whiskey cocktail the old fashion is based on.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 1/2 oz Gum Syrup

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes

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Scofflaw – Original 1934 Harry’s New York Bar Recipe

Scofflaw Cocktail
Scofflaw Cocktail

In 1920s Paris, France, the Scofflaw was invented by a man known as Jock at Harry’s New York Bar. During prohibition, a few European and South American bars modeled themselves after the old American bars and turned up cool drinks like this.

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Scofflaw

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

244

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Scofflaw.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Grenadine

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Manhattan – The Oldest Known Pre-Prohibition Recipe

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Cocktail
Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Cocktail

The History of The Manhattan.

The Manhattan 100% of people think of when they order a Manhattan today is the post-prohibition style Manhattan. Bourbon, sweet vermouth, and angostura bitters. An excellent pairing of flavors, but had you ordered a Manhattan in the 1880s to 1919, you would have been served this cocktail instead. This Manhattan recipe is pulled from the 1887 Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide. I do not say Jerry Thomas invented it, but this is the oldest printing I could find. The Manhattan mainly remained unchanged till 1919, as documented in the Old Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, which reported all their recipes from 1897 to 1919.

The two changes that changed the Manhattan from its pre-prohibition to post-prohibition form are changing from Boker’s bitters to Angostura bitters and no longer adding two dashes of orange liqueur. The recipe changed from using Boker’s bitters because the Boker’s company, which was already struggling financially by the 1910s, completely closed its doors around the start of prohibition. Those who knew the secret recipe took it to their graves. I believe in the mid-2000s, an old unopened bottle of Boker’s was found in a recently deceased man’s attic. The mixture was reverse engineered, and it was discovered to be primarily cardamom, cinnamon, and orange peel bitter. You are now able to find cardamom bitters made in the Boker’s style, but for almost 90 years, the closest anyone could get was using Angostura Bitters. The second change was removing the two dashes of orange liqueur. This change had more to do with the transition from pre-prohibition mixing ideologies to the prohibition era and post-prohibition mixing ideologies. The hallmark of pre-prohibition mixing ideology was to take a decent base spirit and add complexity and flavor with small amounts of bitters and liqueurs, with the base spirit still the most forward element. Prohibition-era and post-prohibition mixing ideology shifted to making flavorful cocktails where the base spirit blended in with the sodas or liqueurs. Not to say these styles were exclusive to any period, but there was a definite shift in what was popular and sold.

I cannot find any specific genesis of the Manhattan or who maybe created it. Often with very old cocktails, the creators were never credited, and many people claim they invented the drink. I can’t find any reference to it before the 1880s, and it was most likely created in New York. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was trendy to name drinks after cities or popular locations in New York. This is what gives us cocktails like the Bronx, the Oyster Bay, Brooklyn, etc. So there is no real reason it’s called a Manhattan other than being a famous New York cocktail naming convention of its time.

What Does The Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Taste Like?

Bourbon and Sweet Vermouth are a match made in heaven. The two ingredients’ flavor profiles pair perfectly. The sweet vermouth adds just enough sweetness to soften the bourbon, and the bourbon adds just enough sharp toasted oak volume and flavor to bring down the vermouth’s solid herbal notes. A few dashes of orange liqueur and cardamon bitters add a nice gentle citrus and spice complexity to the cocktail that Angostura bitters do not provide. These are all wonderful ingredients, and combined; they make a wonderfully sweet and spicy cocktail. I like the modern Angostura bitters Manhattan better, but this one is also tasty. If I were to equate the two to sipping spirits, I would say the original pre-prohibition one is like sipping rye whiskey, and the current one everyone knows it is like sipping bourbon.

What Is The Difference Between The Manhattan And The Old Fashioned?

Whether it’s the pre-prohibition or post-prohibition style, the Manhattan and old fashion are, for the most part, very similar cocktails. The main difference between the two is since the old-fashioned uses simple syrup/gum syrup to cut the strength of the bourbon; the taste is still a very clean, bourbon forward cocktail. On the other hand, the Manhattan comes across with a more mild bourbon taste that is balanced against a lightly sweet herbal flavor. So the Manhattan is a slightly sweetened bourbon and herbal flavored cocktail, and the old fashion is a somewhat sweeter but clean bourbon tasting cocktail.

Get The Sweet Vermouth Right.

The most essential ingredients in the pre-prohibition style Manhattan are the sweet vermouth and the cardamom bitters. Boker’s Bitters was one of the quintessential tastes of the 1800s cocktail, and you can finally get that flavor again with cardamom bitters. It’s like tasting history. A little bit more than the bitters, though, is the sweet vermouth. Vermouth is the defining flavor of this cocktail, and for not much more, you can buy some fantastic sweet vermouths. There isn’t a “bad” sweet vermouth, the cheap stuff is still pretty good, but for five bucks more, you can buy some fantastic top-shelf vermouths that will elevate this cocktail to new heights.

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Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a pre-prohibition style Manhattan cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 10 – 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into a glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed lemon peel

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Oyster Bay – Classic Pre-Prohibition Cocktail

Oyster Bay
Oyster Bay

This drink is most likely named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, whose home is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During the earlier days of mixing, there was a trend on the east coast to name drinks after regions of New York. If the oyster was a crayon color, one could also say it had an oyster color. Don’t be put off by the strange color of this drink because it’s pretty good.

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Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Oyster Bay

2 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

194

kcal
ABV

35%

Total time

3

minutes

While not the prettiest cocktail its actually pretty good.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Orange Bitters

  • 1 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 2 tsp Orange Liqueur

  • 2 tsp Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Horses Neck – Refreshing Bourbon And Ginger Cocktail

Horses Neck Cocktail
Horses Neck Cocktail

This was the Irish Mule before ordering an Irish Mule became a thing. Dating back to the 1890s, this drink was originally a nonalcoholic drink that folks started to fortify with brandy or whiskey because, why not? The only real difference between this and an Irish Mule is this drink has a large lemon peel for flavor, whereas an Irish Mule has a bit of lime juice for that citrus flavor.

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Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Horses Neck

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

225

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Horses Neck.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Cut a long peel from a lemon and place it in the glass filled with ice.
  • Simply combine both ingredients and ice into the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Old Fashioned – The Best Classic Recipe

Old Fashioned
Old Fashioned

The History Of The Old Fashioned.

The Old Fashioned is an outstanding cocktail. The post-prohibition world’s best attempt at making a classic Whiskey Cocktail with what was still available after prohibition had killed off so many ingredients and techniques. Before people started calling this an Old Fashioned, it was just a Whiskey Cocktail. Prohibition brought about a massive paradigm shift in the way cocktails were made. Before the ratification of the 18th amendment and the start of prohibition, lightly flavored, high-quality spirits were popular among many drinkers. You can identify these vintage-style American cocktails by a couple of ounces of a base spirit lightly flavored with no more than 2 or 3 dashes of other flavorful ingredients and just enough sweetness to cut the spirit’s burn. With the start of prohibition in 1917, the quality of most liquor greatly diminished and high-quality spirits were priced out of most people’s range, and most trained bartenders left the profession and got jobs that were not illicit. Suddenly over night, there was a loss of quality products and knowledge. The cocktails that gained in popularity were the highball and sour style cocktails. Not to say they didn’t exist before this but prohibition had made them more popular. Highballs and sours were slightly easier to make and had more significant amounts of intensely flavored ingredients that helped mask the taste of poor quality spirits. The epitome of this is the tiki drink, which was created during prohibition and saw the first tiki bar open in Hollywood, CA, in 1933, immediately once prohibition ended. If an older individual wanted to order a whiskey cocktail like they remembered having before prohibition, they would need to ask for a whiskey cocktail made in the old fashion. Keep in mind that prohibition lasted for 16 years; a person turning 21 in 1917 was now 37. An entire drinking generation had grown up not having access to this kind of cocktail. If you are curious to learn more about the predecessor to this cocktail, then I would check out the Whiskey Cocktail

What Does The Old Fashioned Taste Like?

The Bourbon’s oak and caramel flavors are still the most forward flavors, but the Angostura bitters provide a dark, heavy, spicy, bark, earthy flavor. The simple syrup is just enough to cut the sharpness of the bourbon, but not to make this a sweet drink.

Using The Right Bourbon In An Old Fashioned.

The most essential ingredient in an Old Fashioned is the bourbon you use. The Bitters are crucial too, but the simple syrup and bitters are still subtle enough to add flavor to the bourbon rather than overpower the drink. You also don’t want to pick a bourbon that is too mellow or one that is too strong. The bitters will overwhelm you if it’s too smooth, and you lose the bourbon taste. If it’s too sharp, you’re trying to slowly sip and enjoy a bourbon not meant to be consumed slowly and thoroughly. A sharper spirit like that would be better suited for other cocktails with other much more assertive flavors.

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Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Old Fashioned Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Classic Old Fashioned.

Ingredients

  • Angostura Bitters
  • Simple Syrup
  • Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.