Sazerac – Original Recipe & History

Sazerac

Sazerac

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

226

kcal
ABV

34%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Sazerac.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 dash Peychaud’s Bitters

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 3 oz Rye Whiskey

  • 2 dash Absinthe

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass. Garnish with an expressed lemon peel

Recipe Video

Notes

The Origins And History Of The Sazerac Cocktail.

The most complete history of the Sazerac cocktail comes from Stanley Clisby Arthur in his 1938 book “Famous New Orleans Drinks and how to mix ’em.” It is not the oldest written recipe, though. That goes to the 1908 book “The World’s Drinks and how to Mix Them” by Boothby. However, the latter Arthur’s history and recipe are considered canon today.

John B. Schiller was a New Orleans agent and distributor for “Sazerac-de-Forge et fils,” who operated out of a location on Canal and Royal Street. Schiller acquired the site in 1859 and opened a bar in the rear of the building facing Exchange Alley/Place, where he made all kinds of drinks and cocktails elusively with Sazerac-de-Forge Brandy. The location was named Sazerac Coffee House, and a large tiled mosaic of the word Sazerac was placed at the bar’s entrance. While writing this history in 1938, Arthur says the mosaic was still there, but the location was currently a barbershop.

The bar’s namesake cocktail, The Sazerac, was probably more like the recipe in the 1908 Boothby book. Schiller’s original Sazerac is described by Arthur (Who got this history from Leon Dupont, who worked as a bartender there a few years later) as a simple Brandy, Peychaud’s bitters, and sugar cocktail. It’s debated when Absinthe was first added. In 1870 the bar was bought by Schiller’s bookkeeper Thomas H. Handy. The large tile mosaic was just too nice, and Handy kept the mosaic and changed the name to “Sazerac House” since Handy was not an exclusive distributor with Sazerac, he no longer felt obligated only to use Sazerac Brandy in the bar’s cocktails. The Sazerac recipe changed, and the brandy was replaced with rye whiskey, and Dupont says this was when absinthe was added too. The recipe provided here is from the 1938 book “Famous New Orleans Drinks and how to mix ’em” by Leon Dupont. Dupont was a bartender at the Sazerac House under Thomas Handy and claimed this is how they made the Sazerac while he worked there. I did double the volumes since it made a very short drink.

What is Selner Bitters?

In the 1908 Boothby Book, he states that one of the ingredients is Selner bitters. From all the research I could do, I can not find anything on what Selner Bitters were, and no one else ever references them. Boothby’s book is the only book in which these bitters are ever mentioned. But they did exist. On page 5 of the New Orleans Daily Crescent from May 14, 1859, an import distributor named S. Wolff has “Selner’s German Bitters” for sale in his newspaper ad. This verifies that those specific bitters were present in New Orleans when John B. Schiller opened the Sazerac Coffee house. For context, this ad is from there is a slave auction ad above it. What did these imported german bitters taste like? Who knows.
I cannot find any reference to them in other cocktails books from the 1800s, and they are used in only two recipes in Boothby’s book. They were not common. People reading Boothby’s book in 1908 had probably never heard even then, and p. I tried to look in the german newspaper and historical literature websites, but since I do not understand German, I did not get very far. Selner wasn’t the only bitter tonic advertised as a “German Bitter.” There were a few others, the most popular being Dr. Hooflands German Bitters. This makes me wonder if German bitters have a consistent style and taste. Based on the benefits Hooflands German Bitters provided, I would guess they were a juniper, camomile, ginger bitter with cocaine and cannabis. Perhaps it’s a fashion similar to Underberg. We may never know.

Should The Sazerac Be Made With Brandy Or Rye?

Neither way is wrong. It just depends on which recipe you are making and what you like. I don’t doubt the authenticity of Boothby’s 1908 recipe, but the use of Selner’s German Bitters makes this version impossible to recreate. The later 1938 Arthur recipe is the most well know, but even the author says it was first made with Brandy. So it’s up to you. Try both and see which you prefer. I prefer it made with rye whiskey, but both are good.

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Manhattan – Original Recipe & History

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Cocktail

Pre-Prohibition Manhattan

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a pre-prohibition style Manhattan cocktail

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Cardamom Bitters

  • 2 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 10 – 15 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into a glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed lemon peel

Recipe Video

Notes

Featured Video

The History of The Manhattan.

The Manhattan most people think of when they order a Manhattan today is the post-prohibition style Manhattan. Bourbon, sweet vermouth, and angostura bitters. An excellent pairing of flavors, but had you ordered a Manhattan from the 1880s to 1919, you would have been served this cocktail instead. The oldest printed reference to the manhattan cocktail I can find is from August 31, 1882, Crawford Avalanche newspaper of Michigan and the December 4, 1883, Evening Star newspaper of Washington DC. The bartender interviewed in the Crawford newspaper mentions that he was the first to introduce “Manhattan cocktails” to the area, and he likes to make his with “whiskey, vermouth, and bitters” The bartender in the DC newspaper says he pre-batches them with gin and vermouth. Both newspapers refer to a new Manhattan style of cocktail currently in vogue and talk about it as if it is a style rather than a specific drink. A few years later, both newspaper and cocktail books seem to have settled on the Manhattan as specifically a whiskey cocktail. This Manhattan recipe is pulled from the 1887 Jerry Thomas Bartenders Guide. This is the oldest printing I could find from a cocktail recipe book. The Manhattan remained unchanged until 1919, as documented in the Old Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, which reported all their recipes from 1897 to 1919.

The two changes that changed the Manhattan from its pre-prohibition to post-prohibition form are changing from Boker’s bitters to Angostura bitters and no longer adding two dashes of orange liqueur. The recipe changed from using Boker’s bitters because the Boker’s company, which was already struggling financially by the 1910s, completely closed its doors around the start of prohibition. Those who knew the secret recipe took it to their graves. I believe in the mid-2000s, an old unopened bottle of Boker’s was found in a recently deceased man’s attic. The mixture was reverse engineered, and it was discovered to be primarily cardamom, cinnamon, and orange peel bitter. You are now able to find cardamom bitters made in the Boker’s style, but for almost 90 years, the closest anyone could get was using Angostura Bitters. The second change was removing the two dashes of orange liqueur. This change had more to do with the transition from pre-prohibition mixing ideologies to the prohibition era and post-prohibition mixing ideologies. The hallmark of pre-prohibition mixing ideology was to take a decent base spirit and add complexity and flavor with small amounts of bitters and liqueurs, with the base spirit still the most forward element. Prohibition-era and post-prohibition mixing ideology shifted to making flavorful cocktails where the base spirit blended in with the sodas or liqueurs. Not to say these styles were exclusive to any period, but there was a definite shift in what was popular and sold.

I cannot find any specific genesis of the Manhattan or who maybe created it. Often with very old cocktails, the creators were never credited, and many people claim they invented the drink. I can’t find any reference to it before the 1880s, and it was most likely created in New York. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was trendy to name drinks after cities or popular locations in New York. This is what gives us cocktails like the Bronx, the Oyster Bay, Brooklyn, etc. So there is no real reason it’s called a Manhattan other than being a famous New York cocktail naming convention of its time.

What Does The Pre-Prohibition Manhattan Taste Like?

Bourbon and Sweet Vermouth are a match made in heaven. The two ingredients’ flavor profiles pair perfectly. The sweet vermouth adds just enough sweetness to soften the bourbon, and the bourbon adds just enough sharp toasted oak volume and flavor to bring down the vermouth’s solid herbal notes. A few dashes of orange liqueur and cardamon bitters add a nice gentle citrus and spice complexity to the cocktail that Angostura bitters do not provide. These are all wonderful ingredients, and combined; they make a wonderfully sweet and spicy cocktail. I like the modern Angostura bitters Manhattan better, but this one is also tasty. If I were to equate the two to sipping spirits, I would say the original pre-prohibition one is like sipping rye whiskey, and the current one everyone knows it is like sipping bourbon.

What Is The Difference Between The Manhattan And The Old Fashioned?

Whether it’s the pre-prohibition or post-prohibition style, the Manhattan and old fashion are, for the most part, very similar cocktails. The main difference between the two is since the old-fashioned uses simple syrup/gum syrup to cut the strength of the bourbon; the taste is still a very clean, bourbon forward cocktail. On the other hand, the Manhattan comes across with a more mild bourbon taste that is balanced against a lightly sweet herbal flavor. So the Manhattan is a slightly sweetened bourbon and herbal flavored cocktail, and the old fashion is a somewhat sweeter but clean bourbon tasting cocktail.

Get The Sweet Vermouth Right.

The most essential ingredients in the pre-prohibition style Manhattan are the sweet vermouth and the cardamom bitters. Boker’s Bitters was one of the quintessential tastes of the 1800s cocktail, and you can finally get that flavor again with cardamom bitters. It’s like tasting history. A little bit more than the bitters, though, is the sweet vermouth. Vermouth is the defining flavor of this cocktail, and for not much more, you can buy some fantastic sweet vermouths. There isn’t a “bad” sweet vermouth, the cheap stuff is still pretty good, but for five bucks more, you can buy some fantastic top-shelf vermouths that will elevate this cocktail to new heights.

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Rattlesnake – Original Recipe & History

Rattlesnake

Rattlesnake

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

231

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Rattlesnake Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole Egg White

  • 2 dashes Absinthe

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without any ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when it is not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does The Rattlesnake Taste Like?

This tastes very similar to a whiskey sour with egg whites. They taste almost the same, but the small addition of absinthe does add an excellent herbal profile to the cocktail. If you like sours and herbal flavors, this is one to try. The Savoy Cocktail Book claimed it was so strong it could cure a rattlesnake bite, but it’s not that intense, it’s pretty lovely, and I would say an improvement over the standard whiskey sour.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Mexican Coffee – Classic Recipe & History

Mexican Coffee

Mexican Coffee

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

314

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Mexican Coffee.

Ingredients

  • 1/8 tsp Ground Cloves

  • 1/8 tsp Ground Cinnamon

  • 1.5 oz Tequila

  • 1/2 oz Coffee Liqueur

  • 5 oz Coffee

  • 2 oz Heavy Cream

Directions

  • Simply combine the ingredients in a warm glass except for the heavy cream.Mexican Coffee
  • Add heavy cream to shaker and shake for around 1 minute to thicken into whipped cream.Irish Coffee
  • Float cream on top.Mexican Coffee

Recipe Video

Notes

History Of The Mexican Coffee

The earliest reference to the Mexican Coffee That I can find is from a 1972 book titled “The Good Time Manual” by Russell Riera and Christopher Smith. The book was a collection of restaurants that the two liked in the Bay Area. One of the restaurants the authors write about is Señor Pico in Ghirardelli Square. Señor Pico was a mexican/Souther Californian concept restaurant by Victor Bergeron. Victor Bergeron was famous for his chain of Trader Vic’s Tiki restaurants and wanted to experiment with a Mexican-themed restaurant. Ghirardelli Square is right next to the Buena Vista Cafe. Riera and Smith state in their book that being so close to the Buena Vista Cafe, famous for its Irish Coffees, Bergeron invented a Mexican-flavored version of the drink.

Around the 1980s the, Mexican Coffee became common in many Mexican restaurants, and by the 1990s, it started appearing in some cocktail books. Not to say Victor Bergeron was the first to mix tequila with coffee. People have been mixing coffee and alcohol for a very long time. Still, his Mexican restaurant, Señor Pico, was the first to give it a name and the regular recipe we still use today.

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Santa Cruz Sour – Classic Recipe & History

Santa Cruz Sour

Santa Cruz Sour

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Santa Cruz Sour.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Is The Difference Between The Rum Sour, Santa Cruz Sour, And The St. Croix Sour?

The rum sour, Santa Cruz sour, and St. Croix Sour are all the same drinks, and one name is not more correct than the other. Even though rum sour is the name used today, I went with the name Santa Cruz Sour because it’s the name used in the oldest cocktail book to reference it. The oldest name for this cocktail that I could find was Jerry Thomas’s Santa Cruz Sour in his 1862 edition of The Bartenders Guide. The reason he used that name was the island the very popular Cruzan rum used in the cocktail came from was St. Croix, but he used the original Spanish spelling of the island. Even into the early 1900s, the name of this cocktail was still the Santa Cruz Sour or the St. Croix Sour. St. Croix is the more modern French spelling of the island’s name, so some bartenders preferred to use that spelling instead of the older Spanish spelling. This cocktail wasn’t called the rum sour until around the 1930s when cocktails books began to group all sours as a general recipe. Most books say, “Sours are usually all prepared the same. The juice of half a lemon, one tablespoon of syrup, and 2 oz of any spirit. Gin, whiskey, brandy, rum, etc.”. The name Santa Cruz or St. Croix dropped, and the more generic term, rum sour, became common.

To Add Egg Whites Or Not To Add Egg Whites.

Historically speaking, if a cocktail was a simple sour, it did not have egg whites. Yes, there were cocktails like the clover club or pink lady that had egg whites, or you can go back even further to the Fizz-style cocktails from the 1880s that had egg whites. But not until the early 1950s am I able to find anyone using egg whites in a cocktail labeled a Sour. Sour cocktails before the 1950s that used egg whites in this way all seemed to have fun names and were presented as cocktails for the ladies. In the 1930s or 40s, if a man ordered a whiskey sour and were handed one with egg whites, he would probably be offended or think the bartender mixed his drink up with some women’s at the bar. I looked through maybe 100+ books ranging from the 1880s to the late 1960s, which was pretty consistently what I found.

The earliest use of egg whites in a standard sour I could find was from King Cocktail by Eddie Clark. In 1947 Eddie Clark was the successor head bartender to Harry Craddock at the Savoy. The 1955 official British Bartenders union cocktail book, The UKBG, also mentions using egg whites in sours, but both books say they are optional and not traditional. Assumedly egg whites were added upon request and not the usual way a whiskey sour was made. Keep in mind Harry Craddock, 1920 – the 40s, did not make his sours with egg whites. All those cocktails had different fun names. Eddie Clark even grouped those fun cocktails in his book’s “For ladies only” section.

A Short History Of Sours.

While a standard American style sour is likely as old as the country itself, it traces its origins to the Age of Exploration. In the mid-1500s, the Spanish Navy began preserving concentrated lime juice in high-proof spirits that could last on long voyages as medication to fight and prevent scurvy. These medications were known for being super sour and not tasting good. In the early 1800s, there were attempts at improving these into actually good drinks, and one of these is the standard Sour cocktail of 2 oz base spirit, 1 oz citrus, and 1/2 oz simple syrup. This traditional recipe still has its roots in the overly sour medication, but by reducing the citrus by 1/3, you end up with a tastier product. Please enjoy this early rum sour pulled from the 1862 edition of the Bar-Tenders guide by Jerry Thomas.

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Side Car – Original Recipe & History

Sidecar

Side Car

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Side Car.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Side Car

The Side Car is often considered a French cocktail, which I believed too for many years, but it is British. Barman Pat MacGarry invented the Side-Car at Buck’s Club sometime between 1919 and 1923. We know this because the earliest printed recipe for the Side Car comes from the 1923 book “Harry of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails” by Harry McElhone. McElhone credits Pat MacGarry for inventing the Side Car while at Buck’s Club. In the 1925 Frech cocktail book “L’Art du Shaker” by Dominique Migliorero. Migliorero also credits the creation of the Side Car to MacGarry of London. Buck’s Club opened in 1919. Therefore Pat MacGarry had to have invented it between 1919 and 1923.

The History Of Buck’s Club London

The Buck Club was founded in 1919 by Herbert Buckmaster of the Royal Horse Guard. Herbert Buckmaster intended Buck’s Club to be an upper-class club with less of the stuffiness of other elite London clubs. One of Buckmaster’s requirements for the club was it should have an American-style bar. Not uncommon in hotels that served guests from overseas, but the idea of an American Bar in a prestigious invite-only boys club was unheard of. Buckmaster hired Pat MacGarry to head his American Bar. MacGarry never published his own cocktail book, but he is credited with having invented the Buck’s Fizz and the side-car. To this day, Buck’s Club is still an all-boys, invitation-only club.

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Boulevardier – Original Recipe & History

Boulevardier Cocktail

Boulevardier

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Boulevardier. The perfect blend of sweet and bitter aperitifs with a nice bourbon base. 

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed orange peel.

Recipe Video

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier was invented in Paris in the early 1920s by an American journalist, Erskine Gwynne. We know this because the Boulevardier was first recorded in the 1927 book Barflies and Cocktails by Harry MacElhone. In a section at the back of the book titled “Cocktails Around Town” by Arthur Moss, he states that Erskine Gwynne comes to parties making this cocktail. It’s essentially a bourbon variation of the Negroni. The word boulevardier is a French term for a wealthy, fashionable socialite man. Similar to the English term “man about town,” It is easy to mispronounce the name if you don’t speak French ( I don’t, and I had to look it up the first time I heard of this drink ), but the phonetic way to say it is “bool-ah-vard-ee-a.” If you say this wrong the first few times, you are in good company because everyone struggles with the name of this cocktail at first, so Google it to hear someone say it.

How To Order A Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier is a very cool drink to order and has tricked people into thinking I am more sophisticated than I am. The Negroni has an old man connotation, but the boulevardier is what young high-class men order. In addition, any bar can make it. Every bar, from your small average corner bar to a high-class craft bar, and you won’t look out of place ordering it either. There are very few cocktails you can say that about. So if the bar has a liquor license, they can make the boulevardier. The bartender will already know what it is, and it will be made pretty well.

What Does The Boulevardier Taste Like?

The boulevardier is a very well-balanced tasting cocktail. The bitter medicinal flavor of the Campari is complimented nicely by the herbal sweet Vermouth, with a nice caramel-y, vanilla-y bourbon base. It’s a fantastic and straightforward drink worthy of all its praise. That being said, it is not for everyone. I like strong drinks and herbal flavors, which are perfect for someone like me. On the other hand, my wife is more a Moscow Mule kind of person, and she would never want a drink like this. If you like Manhattans or Negronis, you will love it, but if you are more of a rum and coke or Moscow mule kind of person, this cocktail, b will not like the boulevardier.

Variations Of This Cocktail.

Popular variations of this kind of cocktail are:

A Nice Vermouth Makes A World Of Difference.

The most essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and while bourbon provides a nice vanilla and toasted oak base to the drink and does matter, it’s the sweet vermouth that will make the most significant difference. The strong Campari and vermouth flavors overpower the subtle bourbon flavors. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones out there. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it oxidizes after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of them spoil before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for an average 750mLs bottle of sweet vermouth, you will end up wasting half of it anyway, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

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Daiquiri No.4 – The Mistranslated Recipe

Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail

Daiquiri No.4

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

155

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Featured Video

What Does the Mistranslated Daiquiri #4 Taste Like?

This is the mistranslated Daiquiri #4 recipe from the Bar La Florida cocktail book. Even though the English translation swapped the lime juice for lemon, it’s still a fabulous cocktail and my favorite of the numbered daiquiri variations from Bar La Florida. The lemon and maraschino liqueur combine perfectly and make a fantastic sour cocktail.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

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Americano – Classic Recipe & History

Americano Cocktail

Americano

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

162

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic 1860s Americano. 

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Campari

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in your serving glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients and chill the glass.
  • Gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation.
  • Garnish with an orange slice.

Recipe Video

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The History Of The Americano.

The Americano cocktail was invented around the mid-1860s in Milan, Italy, by Gaspare Campari. Gaspare ran around Italy trying to sell his bitter aperitif until he met his wife and settled down in Milan. Settling down in Milan, he opened up Gaspare’s Bar, where he sold his aperitif, which he also named after himself, and began mixing up the house cocktail called the Milano-Torino. Milano because that is where he produced Campari and Torino because that is the town that produced Italian sweet vermouth. As time went on, the drink became a huge hit and the drink of choice for many traveling Americans. By the early 1900s, the Milano-Torino became better known as an Americano. It is considered the predecessor to the Negroni since the Negroni was invented as a strong Americano. The difference between the Americano and its more famous younger brother, the Negroni, is the Negroni Swaps the 120ml (4 oz) of soda water for 30 mls (1 oz) of gin. This changes the cocktail from a refreshing and light highball to a boozy and more bitter lowball cocktail.

What Are Some Variations Of The Americano?

Variations of the Americano include The Negroni, The Boulevardier, The Man About Town, and the Patricia. These cocktails have a similar flavor profile to the americano but are very different in style. They are all short, strong drinks, while the Americano is tall, light, and refreshing. There is nothing quite like the americano, but these four are the most similar.

What Does the Americano Taste Like?

The Americano taste is refreshing since the soda water helps cut the bitter and herbal Aperitifs. The flavor is still very medicinal and not for everyone. If you like medicinal or herbal tastes, you may like this, but if you are someone who sticks to rum and cokes, adioses, or mules, then this may not be for you. If you are curious about trying Campari, this would be the drink to start with.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and soda water is all the same, but the sweet vermouth you use will make a big difference. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it doesn’t go well after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of it spoiled before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for a large normal bottle of sweet vermouth that you will end up wasting half off, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

Variations Of This Cocktail.

Popular variations of this kind of cocktail are:

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Boston Sour – Trader Vic’s Recipe

Boston Sour

Boston Sour

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

19%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Whiskey sour with egg whites.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Egg Whites

  • 2/3 oz lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

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What Is The Difference Between The Boston Sour And The Whiskey Sour?

There is debate whether to call this recipe a Whiskey Sour or a Boston Sour. I will go with Boston Sour, and here is why. 1). I can find no cocktail books that list adding egg whites to a whiskey sour till the 1950s (Read the section below for more detailed information about when egg whites started being used in sours). Whiskey sours were traditionally just lemon juice, sugar, and bourbon. Adding egg whites to cocktails was considered girly, and no machismo man would want to be seen ordering a girly whiskey sour. Even if it made them feel super cute. 2). Traditionally cocktails with egg white had fun, unique names to indicate that they were not a standard sour—white lady, pink lady, clover club, rattlesnake, million dollar cocktail, etc. The list goes on and on, but the name was always something other than “base spirit” sour. 3). Egg whites were listed as optional/non-traditional in sours from the 1950s -to the 1960s, and I can’t find a recipe that says explicitly you must egg whites till the 1970s. The 1972 edition of Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide is the oldest use of the name Boston Sour I could find in a publication that does not list egg whites as optional. If it’s in a book older than that, then it’s one I don’t have. I will say, though, I combed through a little over 100 books published between 1880 and 1972, looking for the Boston Sour, the first one I found.

So the TLDR of this is, Whiskey sours are not traditionally made with egg whites, and the Boston Sour is the first version of this recipe I found to say you must use egg whites and that they are not optional.

To Add Egg Whites Or Not To Add Egg Whites

Historically speaking, if a cocktail was a simple sour, it did not have egg whites. Yes, there were cocktails like the clover club or pink lady that had egg whites, or you can go back even further to the Fizz-style cocktails from the 1880s that had egg whites. But not until the early 1950s am I able to find anyone using egg whites in a cocktail labeled a Sour. Sour cocktails before the 1950s that used egg whites in this way all seemed to have fun names and were presented as cocktails for the ladies. In the 1930s or 40s, if a man ordered a whiskey sour and were handed one with egg whites, he would probably be offended or think the bartender mixed his drink up with some women’s at the bar. I looked through maybe 100+ books ranging from the 1880s to the late 1960s, which was pretty consistently what I found.

The earliest use of egg whites in a standard sour I could find was from King Cocktail by Eddie Clark. In 1947 Eddie Clark was the successor head bartender to Harry Craddock at the Savoy. The 1955 official British Bartenders union cocktail book, The UKBG, also mentions using egg whites in sours, but both books say they are optional and not traditional. Assumedly egg whites were added upon request and not the usual way a whiskey sour was made. Keep in mind Harry Craddock, 1920 – the 40s, did not make his sours with egg whites. All those cocktails had different fun names. Eddie Clark even grouped those fun cocktails in his book’s “For ladies only” section.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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