Porter And Cream – Recipe

Porter & Cream
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Porter And Cream

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

430

kcal
ABV

6%

Total time

3

minutes

Make a Porter and Cream beer cocktail

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 5 dashes Vanilla Extract

  • 1.5 oz Stabilized Heavy Cream

  • 12 oz Porter Ale

Directions

  • Technique: Build In Glass
  • To make stabilized heavy cream add 1 tbsp (7 g) or cornstarch to 1 cup (240mLs) of heavy cream.
  • Mix the two ingredients with a wire whisk and let it sit for a few minutes before using.
  • Mix stabilized cream, simple syrup, and vanilla extract into a pint glass.
  • Add beer and give the drink a few turns to mix evenly.

Featured Video

The Right Beer Makes A Big Difference.

For this cocktail, I was trying to make a beer cocktail that tasted like a root beer float. I found a sweeter/low bitter porter to taste better. I find stouts to be a bit too bitter and strong to blend well with the cream. Guinness works well but keeps an eye out for a sweeter porter, but the simple syrup can easily be adjusted to offset a more bitter beer. My favorite beer to use when making this is Black Butte Porter by Deschutes Brewery. It’s also one of my favorite porters anyway, so I’m sure that plays a role, in my opinion, but it blends very well with the dairy, sugar, and vanilla extract. So I say find your favorite porter and give it a go. If it misses the mark, then try a different one.

The Problem With Mixing Dairy And Alcohol And How Stabilized Cream Can Help.

Dairy and alcohol do not mix well. Especially dairy and a slightly acidic drink like beer. The problem is in an acidic or alkaline environment, protein will denature (aka cook), and the protein molecules will unfold. These loose unfolded protein molecules can bond together, forming large, firm protein clumps. We call cheese, and a beer with tiny bits of cheese floating about is repulsive. There are two ways to prevent this from happening.

  1. The high-fat content in heavy cream will bond with the alcohol and help prevent it from denaturing the proteins. This is why heavy cream is added to a white Russian and not milk or half and half. The fat will only protect against alcohol, though. Beer is also slightly acidic, and to protect against that, you need something else.
  2. Starch is the secret ingredient that will prevent the protein from bonding together and forming clumps even in an acidic environment.

Using starch to stabilize dairy is nothing new; pastry bakers have been using cream mixed with corn starch for a long time. Boston cream pies, meringues, and whip creams that last for hours. It’s been a long time since I have taken an organic chemistry class but what I believe happens is the starch, which is a long glucose chain, will bind to the unfolded and denatured protein chain. The protein/amino acids will bond to the glucose that makes up the starch instead of to another protein/amino acid chain. This is why a Boston cream filling remains silky smooth after being cooked. There is a bit more to it, and I could talk about the different effects starch will have based on when it is added, but for this specific drink, this will do.

How To Make Stabilized Cream.

To make stabilized heavy cream add 1 tbsp (7 g) or cornstarch to 1 cup (240mLs) of heavy cream. Mix the two ingredients with a wire whisk and let it sit for a few minutes before using.

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Shandy – British Style Recipe

Shandy (Sparkling Clear Lemonade)
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Shandy (British Style)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

168

kcal
ABV

2%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a British-style Shandy.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Stong or Pale Ale

  • 8 oz Clear Sparkling Lemonade (7Up or Sprite)

Directions

  • Technique: Simple Combine
  • Half fill a pint glass with lemonade.
  • Fill the remaining half with beer.

Featured Video

The History Of The Shandy.

The Shandy Gaff is the oldest known version of the shandy-style beer cocktails. The Shandy Gaff is a 1:1 strong or pale ale beer mixed with ginger beer. The earliest printed recipe I could find for the Shandy Gaff is in the 1888 Harry Johnson’s new And Improved Bartender’s Manual. Every recipe I can see from 1888 to 1972 refers to the cocktail as a Shandy Gaff and not simply a Shandy, and they are all made with beer and ginger ale. Although the most popular shandy mixer today is not ginger beer but lemonade. The kind of lemonade used depends on the region.

Americans use the more regionally typical non-carbonated lemonade (like a child’s lemonade stand-style lemonade), the British use clear carbonated lemonade (7Up or Sprite), and the german style uses the cloudy carbonated lemonades (Italian soda style lemonade). The German-style is my favorite way to make it. The first account I could find of the cocktail being called a shandy and make with sparkling lemonade is in a 1989 research paper by John Balding called “We Teach Them How to Drink!” Interestingly that research paper argues that British children will start drinking at young ages anyway, so parents need to teach them responsible ways to drink when they are young. The Shandy is described as gateway alcohol since it is so easy to drink.

The commonly told history of how the lemonade was first mixed with beer comes from Munich, Germany. The story goes that a Pub owner outside Munich was in danger of running out of beer when countless cyclists stopped at his pub for a drink. To avoid running out of beer, he mixed the local lager with lemonade and sold it as the Radlermass. Radlermass is german for “cyclist liter.” The other german name I find for beer and lemonade is Alsterwasser. This is a reference to the Alster River in northern Germany. The article referencing these two german shandies referred to them as tractor or field beers. They were intended as session drinks with a low ABV but enough sugar and calories so that they could be consumed while doing hard work. They could refresh and nourish a sweaty field worker without inhibiting them mentally.

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Shandy Gaff – Classic Recipe & History

Shandy Gaff
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Shandy Gaff

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

2%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Shandy Gaff.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Stong or Pale Ale

  • 8 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Technique: Build In Glass
  • Half fill a pint glass with ginger beer.
  • Fill the remaining half with beer.

Featured Video

The History Of The Shandy And Shandy Gaff.

The Shandy Gaff is the oldest known version of the shandy-style beer cocktails. The Shandy Gaff is a 1:1 strong or pale ale beer mixed with ginger beer. The earliest printed recipe I could find for the Shandy Gaff is in the 1888 Harry Johnson’s new And Improved Bartender’s Manual. Every recipe I can see from 1888 to 1972 refers to the cocktail as a Shandy Gaff and not simply a Shandy, and they are all made with beer and ginger ale. Although the most popular shandy mixer today is not ginger beer but lemonade. The kind of lemonade used depends on the region.

Americans use the more regionally typical non-carbonated lemonade (like a child’s lemonade stand-style lemonade), the British use clear carbonated lemonade (7Up or Sprite), and the german style uses the cloudy carbonated lemonades (Italian soda style lemonade). The German-style is my favorite way to make it. The first account I could find of the cocktail being called a shandy and make with sparkling lemonade is in a 1989 research paper by John Balding called “We Teach Them How to Drink!” Interestingly that research paper argues that British children will start drinking at young ages anyway, so parents need to teach them responsible ways to drink when they are young. The Shandy is described as gateway alcohol since it is so easy to drink.

The commonly told history of how the lemonade was first mixed with beer comes from Munich, Germany. The story goes that a Pub owner outside Munich was in danger of running out of beer when countless cyclists stopped at his pub for a drink. To avoid running out of beer, he mixed the local lager with lemonade and sold it as the Radlermass. Radlermass is german for “cyclist liter.” The other german name I find for beer and lemonade is Alsterwasser. This is a reference to the Alster River in northern Germany. The article referencing these two german shandies referred to them as tractor or field beers. They were intended as session drinks with a low ABV but enough sugar and calories so that they could be consumed while doing hard work. They could refresh and nourish a sweaty field worker without inhibiting them mentally.

Recipe Resources

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Alsterwasser – German Style Shandy Recipe

Shandy (Sparkling Cloudy Lemonade)
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Alsterwasser (German Style Shandy)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: German
Servings

1

servings
Calories

168

kcal
ABV

2%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a German-style Shandy.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Amber or Pale Lager

  • 8 oz Sparkling Cloudy Lemonade

Directions

  • Technique: Simple Combine
  • Half fill a pint glass with lemonade.
  • Fill the remaining half with beer.

Featured Video

The History Of The Shandy.

The Shandy Gaff is the oldest known version of the shandy-style beer cocktails. The Shandy Gaff is a 1:1 strong or pale ale beer mixed with ginger beer. The earliest printed recipe I could find for the Shandy Gaff is in the 1888 Harry Johnson’s new And Improved Bartender’s Manual. Every recipe I can see from 1888 to 1972 refers to the cocktail as a Shandy Gaff and not simply a Shandy, and they are all made with beer and ginger ale. Although the most popular shandy mixer today is not ginger beer but lemonade. The kind of lemonade used depends on the region.

Americans use the more regionally typical non-carbonated lemonade (like a child’s lemonade stand-style lemonade), the British use clear carbonated lemonade (7Up or Sprite), and the german style uses the cloudy carbonated lemonades (Italian soda style lemonade). The German-style is my favorite way to make it. The first account I could find of the cocktail being called a shandy and make with sparkling lemonade is in a 1989 research paper by John Balding called “We Teach Them How to Drink!” Interestingly that research paper argues that British children will start drinking at young ages anyway, so parents need to teach them responsible ways to drink when they are young. The Shandy is described as gateway alcohol since it is so easy to drink.

The commonly told history of how the lemonade was first mixed with beer comes from Munich, Germany. The story goes that a Pub owner outside Munich was in danger of running out of beer when countless cyclists stopped at his pub for a drink. To avoid running out of beer, he mixed the local lager with lemonade and sold it as the Radlermass. Radlermass is german for “cyclist liter.” The other german name I find for beer and lemonade is Alsterwasser. This is a reference to the Alster River in northern Germany. The article referencing these two german shandies referred to them as tractor or field beers. They were intended as session drinks with a low ABV but enough sugar and calories so that they could be consumed while doing hard work. They could refresh and nourish a sweaty field worker without inhibiting them mentally.

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Shandy – American Style Recipe

Shandy American
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Shandy (American Style)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

2%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an American-style Shandy.

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Stong or Pale Ale

  • 8 oz Non-Carbonated Lemonade

Directions

  • Technique: Simple Combine
  • Half fill a pint glass with lemonade.
  • Fill the remaining half with beer.

Featured Video

The History Of The Shandy.

The Shandy Gaff is the oldest known version of the shandy-style beer cocktails. The Shandy Gaff is a 1:1 strong or pale ale beer mixed with ginger beer. The earliest printed recipe I could find for the Shandy Gaff is in the 1888 Harry Johnson’s new And Improved Bartender’s Manual. Every recipe I can see from 1888 to 1972 refers to the cocktail as a Shandy Gaff and not simply a Shandy, and they are all made with beer and ginger ale. Although the most popular shandy mixer today is not ginger beer but lemonade. The kind of lemonade used depends on the region.

Americans use the more regionally typical non-carbonated lemonade (like a child’s lemonade stand-style lemonade), the British use clear carbonated lemonade (7Up or Sprite), and the german style uses the cloudy carbonated lemonades (Italian soda style lemonade). The German-style is my favorite way to make it. The first account I could find of the cocktail being called a shandy and make with sparkling lemonade is in a 1989 research paper by John Balding called “We Teach Them How to Drink!” Interestingly that research paper argues that British children will start drinking at young ages anyway, so parents need to teach them responsible ways to drink when they are young. The Shandy is described as gateway alcohol since it is so easy to drink.

The commonly told history of how the lemonade was first mixed with beer comes from Munich, Germany. The story goes that a Pub owner outside Munich was in danger of running out of beer when countless cyclists stopped at his pub for a drink. To avoid running out of beer, he mixed the local lager with lemonade and sold it as the Radlermass. Radlermass is german for “cyclist liter.” The other german name I find for beer and lemonade is Alsterwasser. This is a reference to the Alster River in northern Germany. The article referencing these two german shandies referred to them as tractor or field beers. They were intended as session drinks with a low ABV but enough sugar and calories so that they could be consumed while doing hard work. They could refresh and nourish a sweaty field worker without inhibiting them mentally.

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Hot Ale Flip – Colonial Recipe & History

Hot Ale Flip
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Quick Step-by-Step Hot Ale Flip Recipe Video

Hot Ale Flip

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

330

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a hot ale flip.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Dark Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

  • 12 oz Ale or Lager

Directions

  • Technique: Toddy Style Preparation
  • Add rum and simple syrup to a large beer glass.
  • Stir rum and syrup together.
  • Pour beer into the glass so that the bubbles are forced out.
  • Dip a hot toddy rod into the drink and stir with the rod as the drink steams.
  • Pour the warmed beer into a serving glass.
  • Garnish:
  • Ground nutmeg.

Recipe Video

Notes

A Short History Of Cooking Beer.

Before the days of bottling and refrigeration, fresh beer had a minimal shelf life, and having to waste any brought a tear to many people’s eyes. So like any food item on its way out, people tried to find ways to get just a couple more uses out of it. I’m sure you do this all the time. Strawberries are starting to get soft. Make a smoothie. Worried about your gigantic bag of onions getting too old, make French onion soup. There are many things you can do before food turns and during the 17th century cooking beer with honey and spices was one way to mask the flavor of a beer going bad.

Earlier forms of the hot ale flip were simple hot ale and honey drinks, and if you want to find these recipes, you’ll need to look in old cookbooks. One such recipe from the 1669 book “The Closet” by Sir Kenelme Digbie is an ale recipe with honey specifically for beer that is about to go wrong. Sir Kenelme Digbie described cooking old beer with honey would help the turned old beer and “set the whole a working a fresh, and casting out foulness.”

Some very old books had tips and tricks for the old food, but with the invention of commercial refrigeration in the mid-1800s, that stopped being such a big problem. Most of those recipes either got lost to time, but many still live on as things you usually eat—fruit pies, jellies, alcohol, pickles, hell, even banana bread. Hence, most recipes specifically call for nasty old soft brown bananas no one wants to eat. It’s for flavor, but it comes from a much older tradition. Old meat was a little harder to repurpose and was something you needed to persevere before it started to turn. Although old meat could be used as bait to catch fresh meat or go fishing, once meat goes bad, it needs to be discarded.

What Does The Hot Ale Flip Taste Like?

Check out my article here, where I have taste-tested many different beers to see which make the best flips. Depending on the beer you use, these can be good or bad. To make it more difficult, it’s almost impossible to know which beers are suitable as a flip and which are not without actually trying them. You think a dark flavorful beer would be tasty warmed with spices, whiskey, and sugar, but most are awful. The flavorful beers seem to turn too bitter, but lighter, more drinkable beers like Boston lager and Budweiser are excellent. The only way to know is to try. I started doing a whole YouTube series on which beers taste good and which taste bad, and my goal is to try every beer I can get my hands on hot. I have a hot beer tier list of my favorite beers so far. I like fat tire, to begin with, but hot it was amazing.

Keep in mind that this is a way of making old beers taste good again. I opened a bottle of beer, poured it, set it on the counter for a day, and it made a better flip than a fresh bottle of the same beer. The new beer tastes better cold, but the old beer tastes better flipped. My mind was blown. No of these results were expected. I believed the opposite to be true of what the actual results were. I only tried it with this one beer (Boston lager since I liked it flipped, to begin with), but I feel I should do the same experiment for others. Doing this will likely make me gain quite a few pounds in the next year, but I think it will be fun.

What Is A Flip?

No one knows where the term flip came from. Some guesses are that it described the bubbles leaving the drink. Like the bubbles flipped from the inside to the outside, or the drink was so strong it would make you flip out of your chair. No one knows, but I have my idea. Some 18th century and earlier books provided ways to repurpose food that was going bad or losing its freshness. I wrote a bit about that in the paragraphs above. It is often referred to as the food or drinks turning. My guess is the term flip was a clever play on words to describe making a turned beer taste good again. Again I have no evidence of this. It’s just a feeling.

I will be using a traditional toddy rod or, as it is also called, a loggerhead to warm the Flip. A stove works too, but a toddy rod imparts a slightly toastier final flavor. If you are curious to learn more, check out this fantastic article on early American toddy culture.

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Best Beers For Cooking And Hot Ale Flips

Hot Ale Flip
Quick Step-by-Step Hot Ale Flip Recipe Video

The Best Beer To Cook With.

Warming beer for cooking or making flips is not something everyone has done and most likely is grossed out by the idea of warm beer, but I’m here to change that. I’ve made many of these, and the taste varies considerably based on the beer used. So this will be a list that I will maintain and continue to update, ranking beers as flips. Taste is subjective, so these will be beers I like heated up that others may not, but I think I have a pretty middle-of-the-road taste in beer. Every beer on this list I like cold. This is just my opinion of them heated up. So take this list as what it is, one man’s opinion, but I will try and be fair.

I will be using a traditional toddy rod, or as it is also called a loggerhead, to warm the beers for a constant test. A stove works too, but a toddy rod imparts a slightly toastier final flavor. If you are curious to learn more, check out this fantastic article about early American toddy culture.

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S Rank: (Amazing When Flipped)

  • Fat Tire (nice malty flavor with light sweetness) – Amber Ale (USA)
  • Blue Moon (light and cider-like) – White Wheat Ale (USA)
  • Miller Highlife (light and sweet almost mead-like) – Pale Lager (USA)
  • Ladenburger Weizenbock Hell (beautiful balance of banana, citrus, and spice) – Wheat Bock (Germany)
  • SchwarzbrĂ€u Marie Hausbrendel Hell (light and sweet almost mead like) – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Modelo Negra (nice malty flavor with light sweetness) – Dunkle Lager (Mexico)
  • KartĂ€user Doppelbock Dunkel (Clove, banana and spice, kinda Christmas like, really really good) – Doppelbock Dunkel Lager (Germany)
  • Samuel Smith’s Chocolate Stout (Unreal how good this is warmed, like chocolate milk but beer. Honestly, WAY better warmed than cold) – Stout (UK)
  • HofbrĂ€u Hefe Weizen (Really lovely light malty sweetness with a more robust citrus flavor) – Hefeweizen Ale (Germany)
  • Budweiser (Oddly really good heated. Thin maltiness, light sweetness. Thin but great taste. reminded me of a Japanese Highball) – Pale Lager (USA)
  • Zywiec Beer (Thin maltiness, nice flavor, fairly sweet when heated) – Pale Lager (Poland)
  • New Belgium Trippel (light sweetness, spiced apple cider flavor) – Belgian Tripel (USA)

A Rank: (Makes A Good Flip)

  • Samuel Adam’s Boston Lager – Amber Lager (USA)
  • Grantler Hell – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Corona Extra – Pale Lager (Mexico)
  • Stella Artois – Pale Lager (Belgium)
  • Blau Weisse – Hefeweizen Ale (Germany)
  • Wittmann Urhell – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Sierra Nevada Brewing Pale Ale – Pale Ale (USA)
  • Samuel Adams Cold Snap – White Wheat Ale (USA)
  • Flötzinger BrĂ€u Hell – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Ettl BrĂ€u Teisnacher 1543 – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Husaren-Trunk – Oktoberfestbier Lager (Germany)
  • Redd’s Hard Apple – Apple Cider (USA)
  • Harp by Guinness – Pale Lager (Ireland)
  • Spaten – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Kona Big Wave – Pale Ale (USA)
  • Carlsberg – Pilsner Lager (Denmark)
  • Foster’s Lager – Pale Lager (Australia)
  • Sapporo Premium Beer – Pale Lager (Japan)
  • Goose Island Neon Beer Hug – IPA (USA)
  • Hitachino Nest White Ale – White Wheat Ale (Japan)
  • Anchor Steam Beer – hybrid Style (USA)
  • Lucky Buddha – Pale Lager (Australia)
  • Big Sky Brewing Moose Drool – Brown Ale (USA)
  • Colorado Brewing Salty Crew – Blonde Ale (USA)

B Rank: (Not A Bad Flip But Not Good)

  • Cali Creamin’ – Cream Ale (USA)
  • Newcastle Brown Ale – Brown Ale (UK)
  • Kirin – Pale Lager (Japan)
  • Peroni – Pale Lager (Italy)
  • Zwönitzer Rauchbier – Amber Lager (Germany)
  • Landgang Brauerei – Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • fĂŒrst carl kellerbier – Keller Lager (Germany)
  • Pizza Port Brewing Bacon & Eggs – Imperial Porter (USA)
  • Hoegaarden – White Wheat Ale (Belgium)
  • Beck’s – Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • Kauzen Pils – Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • Kurpfalz BrĂ€u Helles – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Landbrauerei Ludwig Erl – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Lagunitas IPA – Indian Pale Ale (USA)
  • HerrnbrĂ€u Kellerbier – Pale Lager (Germany)
  • Perlenzauber IPA – Indian Pale Ale (Germany)
  • Smithwicks Red Ale – Amber Ale (Ireland)
  • Duvel – Strong Pale Ale (Belgian)
  • Ballast Point Grapefruit Sculpin – Indian Pale Ale (USA)
  • Foster’s Premium Ale – Bitter Ale (Australia)
  • Coors Light – Pale Lager (USA)
  • Leffe Blonde – Abbey Ale (Belgium)
  • Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout – Stout (UK)
  • Delirium Tremens – Strong Ale (Belgium)
  • Warsteiner Oktoberfest – Marzen lager  (Germany)
  • Taj Mahal – Pale Lager (India)
  • Weihenstephaner – Hefeweizen Ale (Germany)

C Rank: (Not A Good Flipping Beer)

  • Boddingtons – Amber Ale (UK)
  • Founder’s Dirty Bastard – Scotch Ale (USA)
  • Der Schwarze Bock – Bock Lager (Germany)
  • Guinness – Porter/Stout Ale (Ireland)
  • Schlossbrauerei Rheder –  Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • hoamat weissbier – Hefeweizen Ale (Germany)
  • Lindemans Framboise – Raspberry Lambic (Belgium)
  • Black Butte Porter – Porter Ale (USA)
  • Alms Hell – Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • Dos Equis – Pale Lager (Mexico)
  • Kona Longboard – Pale Lager (USA)
  • Old Speckled Hen – Pale Ale (UK)
  • Cusqueña – Pale Lager (Peru)
  • Grolsch – Pilsner Lager (Netherlands)
  • Bud Light – Light Lager (USA)
  • Corona Familiar– Pale Lager (Mexico)
  • Red Stripe – Pale Lager (Jamaica)

D Rank: (Bad, Absolutely Undrinkable When Flipped)

  • Kirta – Dunkelweizen Ale (Germany)
  • New Belgium Accumulation – Indian Pale Ale (USA)
  • Propeller Turbo Prop – Imperial Pilsner Lager (Germany)
  • Wiener Lager –  Vienna Lager (Germany)
  • New Belgium Voodoo Ranger – Imperial IPA (USA)
  • Miller Lite – Pilsner Lager (USA)
  • Pizza Port Itinerary – Indian Pale Ale (USA)
  • Angry Orchard Hard Cider – Apple Cider (USA)
  • Michelob Ultra – Light Lager (USA)
  • Pabst Blue Ribbon – Pale Lager (USA)
  • Elysian Contact Haze – IPA (USA)
  • Goose Island 312– Hefeweizen Ale (USA)
  • Maui Brewing Coconut Hiwa Porter – Porter (USA)

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