Picon Punch – Modern Variation

Picon Punch Strong

Picon Punch (Strong Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Picon Punch Strong.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Amer Picon

  • 2/3 oz Brandy

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients. Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Picon Punch.

If you have not heard of this, it’s not surprising. It’s primarily made in the western side of the United States and is popular in parts of California and Nevada with large Basque immigrant populations. If you go to Basque areas in northern Spain, they will have no idea what this is. Most of the histories I have found on this credit its creation to the Noriega Hotel in Bakersfield, California. Although I think that was more just a story used by the hotel. The earliest printed reference of the Picon Punch is from the 1900 book “Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. It’s the first recipe listed in “miscellaneous and unclassified drinks” and is called an Amer Picon. The drink is labeled as already being a popular beverage in France, and that makes a lot more sense to me than it was invented in Bakersfield, California, during the end of the 19th century. The part I found most difficult to imagine was that a small hotel in Bakersfield was using grenadine before 1900.

The most popular red fruit syrup in the US before 1900 was raspberry syrup. William Boothby was the first American bartender to print recipes using grenadine. Grenadine first started being used in France and England around 1890; in his 1891 edition of the book, the Amer Picon cocktail does not use grenadine but orgeat. The change from orgeat to grenadine makes sense, too, with grenadine’s explosive popularity in France during that decade. Check out my grenadine article for its history and use in cocktails.

The hotel was founded in 1893, so that would have given them plenty of time to use Amer Picon before it stopped being imported to the US in 1920, but I don’t buy that it was invented there. The use of grenadine and references to its recipe many years before its origin story says it was created point to it being traditionally a French cocktail.

This is not the classic Picon Punch, but a strong variation served without ice in a cocktail glass. Both the traditional and this version are delicious, but they have different intents. This strong version transforms the refreshing Picon Punch into a classic-style cocktail.

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Tom & Jerry – Original Recipe & History

Tom and Jerry

Tom & Jerry

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

192

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Tom and Jerry Cocktail.

Ingredients

Directions

  • Drop batter into a ceramic or heat resistant mug. Batter recipe is posted above or click here to read it.tom and jerry
  • Add the spirit and give a couple last stirs to finish mixing the drink.tom and jerry
  • Add warm water and stir till the batter is completely incorporated into the water.tom and jerry
  • Give the drink a few last turns to mix.tom and jerry

Recipe Video

Notes

The History Of The Tom & Jerry.

Jerry Thomas most likely invented the Tom & Jerry since there was no reference to it till Jerry Thomas published his recipe. The cocktail is often credited with being created by him anyway. The story goes that he named the drink after his two pet mice, Thomas and Jerry, which he named after himself. Even Savoy credits him with inventing it, and the Savoy is pretty on point.

While the Tom & Jerry seems to fade in the 1930s, it’s still in the larger cocktail books up through the 1970s (I try to limit this project to only published literature from 1970 and earlier). In his 1972 book, Victor Bergeron even gives a single-serve recipe if one needs to be made on the spot. The Tom & Jerry is a very preparation and labor-intensive drink, so I feel this is relegated to be more of a home holiday party cocktail, and I have never once seen this at a bar ever.

When I first heard of this cocktail, I wondered if the iconic MGM cat and mouse cartoon Tom and Jerry were named after it. Unfortunately, no one knows if the cartoon famous Cat and Mouse duo Tom and Jerry were named after the drink, but it would be a weird coincidence. Joseph Barbara, of Hanna Barbara, wrote in his autobiography “My Life in Toons” how they came up with Tom and Jerry’s names. “We left the choice of names to chance. We invited studio personnel to write down pairs of names on paper and toss them into a hat. We shook the hat and drew Tom and Jerry, which had been submitted by an animator named John Carr. He won fifty dollars.” Maybe John Carr knew the drink from a holiday party; they are all long gone now.

What Is The Difference Between Eggnog And A Tom & Jerry?

Tom and Jerry are often compared to lighter eggnog, but it all depends on which recipe of a Tom and Jerry you are comparing to which eggnog recipe. If you compare a store-bought Tom and Jerry to store-bought eggnog, they taste similar. Today most eggnogs are made with cooked eggs and heavy cream, and the result is a thick, boozy custard. It’s a hefty drink, and a Tom and Jerry with heated milk are lighter with a similar flavor.

To compare apples to apples, if you compare a mid-1800s eggnog recipe to this classic style Tom and Jerry recipe, they are entirely different. This classic style of Tom and Jerry is more cappuccino-like than egg nog. The top has a nice foam similar to a cappuccino, but the drink itself is light. In an 1800s style, eggnog tastes more like a rich milk punch than today’s custard. The modern version of both drinks is similar, with the Tom and Jerry being a warm thinner version of eggnog, but the older versions of both drinks are very different.

What Is Tom & Jerry Batter?

Tom and Jerry’s batter is an egg and Christmas spice flavored mousse. It’s pretty good and doesn’t need to be mixed into a drink. You can make it yourself, or Tom and Jerry batter can be bought in stores during the holiday season in the upper midwest, where the drink is still pretty popular. I used to publish the original recipe on this site. However, I now use an updated one that makes for a considerably better drink while still being very similar flavor-wise to the original. Most modern recipes include butter and heavy cream and are much denser and almost eggnog-like. Mine does not. If the recipe is true to the classic and lacks a heavy fat ingredient, then the problem they are stuck with is using just warm water or milk, as meringue can not be heated so violently and rapidly. These versions taste fine, but I found this one that uses hot water to taste the best. The aroma is better; it sips better and has a more cozy feel to it. At its core, Tom and Jerry Batter face the same issue all egg-based desserts face when heated. The risk of curdling.

Most desserts try to solve this problem by cooking in a water bath so the egg doesn’t get too hot, and the original 1862 recipe could only use warm water and not hot, or else it would curdle. Most modern recipes try to fix this by adding butter or heavy cream since a cooked protein will bond to fat before bonding to another protein or stick with warm water or milk. While this keeps the drink from curdling, it either completely changes the flavor and texture or makes for a weak old, tasting drink. The solution I am using is an old baker’s technique to add a small amount of thickened corn starch, similar to American-style custard. American custards, cream pies, cream fillings, etc., are cooked at rapid high heat like any other dessert and do not curdle. This solution fixes the issue of curdling and lets the drink gets heated to a good hot drinks temperature while maintaining the drink’s original flavor and texture.

Make This Improved Tom & Jerry Batter Recipe.

I tried to change the original recipe and its ratios as little as possible. The only changes I made were adding cornstarch as a stabilizer and reducing the sugar to a more balanced amount. If you do not add cornstarch, then DO NOT use hot water. Only use warmed water or milk as the rapid heat will curdle the egg and make the drink lumpy.

  • 6 Eggs
  • 1.5 cups (300 g) of sugar
  • 1 tbs (15 g) Cornstarch
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) gold rum
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground allspice
  • 1/2 tsp (2.5 g) ground cinnamon
  1. Combine cornstarch and an ounce of hot water, stir till the cornstarch is dissolved and the mixture is thick, then set aside.
  2. Separate the egg whites and yolks into two bowls.
  3. Add the sugar to the egg whites and using an electric mixer (you would be crazy to do this by hand) beat the eggs into a medium peak meringue.
  4. Once you are done beating, still using the electric mixer, slowly add the thickened wet corn starch. The cornstarch can only be added after you are done beating the meringue. The cornstarch prevents the meringue from cooking when you add hot water and curdling.
  5. In the second bowl with the egg yolks add the rum, ground cloves, cinnamon, and allspice. Using the electric mixer again beat the yolks till they become lighter in color and runny.
  6. Add the egg yolk mixture to the meringue and fold to combine.

If you are curious, checkout and read The Improved 1860s Style Tom & Jerry Batter article and learn about the original recipe from the 1862 Bartenders Guide.

Recipe Resources

NOTE: If what you are looking for is the Tom & Jerry Batter Recipe the link for that is here. Also, the video attached to this recipe below provides simple step-by-step instructions to make the batter and drink.

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Picon Punch – Classic Recipe & History

Picon Punch

Picon Punch (Classic Recipe)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

15%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Picon Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Amer Picon

  • 2 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water into the serving glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients together while also chilling them.
  • Lastly add the soda water.
  • Garnish with an expressed lemon peel.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Picon Punch.

If you have not heard of this, it’s not surprising. It’s primarily made in the western side of the United States and is popular in parts of California and Nevada with large Basque immigrant populations. If you go to Basque areas in northern Spain, they will have no idea what this is. Most of the histories I have found on this credit its creation to the Noriega Hotel in Bakersfield, California. Although I think that was more just a story used by the hotel. The earliest printed reference of the Picon Punch is from the 1900 book “Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender” by William Boothby of San Francisco, California. It’s the first recipe listed in “miscellaneous and unclassified drinks” and is called an Amer Picon. The drink is labeled as already being a popular beverage in France, and that makes a lot more sense to me than it was invented in Bakersfield, California, during the end of the 19th century. The part I found most difficult to imagine was that a small hotel in Bakersfield was using grenadine before 1900.

The most popular red fruit syrup in the US before 1900 was raspberry syrup. William Boothby was the first American bartender to print recipes using grenadine. Grenadine first started being used in France and England around 1890; in his 1891 edition of the book, the Amer Picon cocktail does not use grenadine but orgeat. The change from orgeat to grenadine makes sense, too, with grenadine’s explosive popularity in France during that decade. Check out my grenadine article for its history and use in cocktails.

The hotel was founded in 1893, so that would have given them plenty of time to use Amer Picon before it stopped being imported to the US in 1920, but I don’t buy that it was invented there. The use of grenadine and references to its recipe many years before its origin story says it was created point to it being traditionally a French cocktail.

What Does The Picon Punch Taste Like?

This is a refreshing, lightly sweet, fruity, and herbal cocktail. It’s a lot of flavors that don’t sound like they should work together, but they do. It’s like an herbal pomegranate flavored soda, but it’s hard to describe and is one you need to try. While the garnish can be essential in cocktails (Some are purely decorative), it is necessary for this cocktail. The lemon oil on top took this cocktail from being just ok to being good. Also, the Aperitif you use makes a huge difference so get one you like to drink straight. I used Amaro Nonino, which turned out great, but Amaro Nonino is pretty pricey, so if you want another one, give that a try.

A substitute aperitif has to be used because Amer Picon is not imported into the US and has not been since prohibition. Also, Amer Picon isn’t made the same today as during the turn of the century. The alcohol content is different, and so is the flavor. It used to be around 40% abv, and today it’s 18%, and the taste has been updated for modern palates, so it’s an entirely different drink other than the name. You’ll never be able to recreate this drink in its original form completely, so find a bittersweet/orangey aperitif you like.

Recipe Resources

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Planter’s Punch #4 – Modern 1984 Recipe

Planter's Punch Cocktail

Planter’s Punch – Planters Inn 1984 Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

147

kcal
ABV

16%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Planter’s Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 1.5 oz Black Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into glass filled with crused ice.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Planter’s Punch.

The truth is, no one alive knows the origins of this cocktail, and every best guess of its origin is just the best guess. The issue I have struggled with (and I’m sure many other drink writers have, too) is hoping to find that one true origin story. There are two common origins to the Planter’s Punch that get tossed around:

  1. Mid 1800s Jamaica.
  2. The Old Planter’s Hotel in Charleston, SC.

Had I been asked ten years ago, I would have pushed the hotel idea; then, I pivoted to the Jamaica one. Now I kinda say to hell with it; there seems to be a planter’s punch for every island in the Caribbean, with neither more “authentic” than the other. But the different significant versions are worth exploring. After much reading, I have concluded that every place that had a plantation probably had a version of the planter’s punch.

Planter’s Hotel 1984 Planter’s Punch Recipe.

The original Planter’s Hotel opened in 1809 and was mostly destroyed during the civil war. It did reopen but not as the elite southern hotel it once was. It eventually closed around the turn of the 20th century. The present-day Planter’s Hotel opened in 1984. Not to say the original hotel didn’t have a version of the planter’s punch, but there is no way they invented what we currently consider a planter’s punch. The issue here is that grenadine (A common ingredient in most planter’s punch recipes) didn’t begin to be used in cocktails until the turn of the 20th century. The earliest printed recipe with grenadine was in George Kappeler’s “Modern American Drinks,” published in 1895. Also, there is no known evidence of the original hotel having a house punch recipe. So this recipe is the present-day Planter’s Inn recipe from the 80s, But not to knock them too much, they have one of my favorite versions of this drink.

  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Orange Juice
  • 1 oz (30 mLs) Pineapple Juice
  • 1 Barspoon (5 mLs) Grenadine
  • 1 1/2 oz (45 mLs) Black Rum

Why Are There So Many Planter’s Punch Recipes?

I include all these because they are all delicious, and one is not more authentic than the others. The oldest known recipe may be the Fun magazine recipe, but there is no certainty that it is even the original. There are more versions of this cocktail than I have included here, and they are all different and good. So don’t let anyone tell you your recipe is wrong because there is no right way to make the drink.

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Milk Punch – Classic 1862 Recipe

Milk Punch Cocktail

Milk Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

335

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Milk Punch.

Ingredients

  • 3 dashes Vanilla Extract

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Cream

  • 1 oz Gold Rum

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add crushed ice to the shaker.
  • Lightly shake the drink.
  • Pour the whole contents of the shaker into the glass.

Notes

Featured Video

Using Dairy In Cocktails.

So you may notice this is a milk punch, but the milk punch does not use milk. Mixing with dairy is a pain in the ass, and that’s because alcohol, like acid, causes milk protein to bind together and make cheese. What protects the protein from binding together is fat. Regular milk doesn’t have enough fat, so you will make curds and whey punch every time instead. The trick is to balance the higher ABVs with the correct fat percentage. This one comes in around 15%, and at that abv half & half works well. Something like a white Russian, which is 30%, needs heavy cream because that’s too much booze and would curdle half & half. If you use milk, you would need to add less alcohol and water it down some to hopefully not have it curdle.

On a side note, I experimented with making this with oat milk and almond milk, and it was ok. They tasted fine, but they lacked the creaminess of actual dairy. Kind of like substituting almond milk in coffee. It’s OK but not good. Also, this follows older recipes pretty closely, but I feel this is a superior version. One of the oldest ones I could find was Jerry Thomas’s version.

• 15mls/ tea spoon of sugar
• 60mls/ 2 ounces of brandy
• 30mls/ 1 ounce rum
• remainder of glass filled with milk and ice

I like booze, but it was too boozy and the milk curdled. I took the ingredients of most of the milk punches I found, increased the fat content, and decreased the booze by a 1/4, and that’s what this recipe is. It won’t curdle, and I think the parts are a better balance.

What Is The Difference Between Eggnog And Milk Punch

Eggnog and milk punch are similar drinks, but the main difference is eggnog is made with both dairy and eggs, and milk punch is only made with dairy. Adding an egg or not also changes how the drink is consumed. A milk punch is shaken and served right away with the intent that it is consumed right then and there. On the other hand, eggnog is typically stored and consumed over a more extended period. Eggs add a thicker texture to the drink, adding stability. Egg yolks are around 10 to 15% lecithin, a powerful emulsifier. Lecithin emulsifies fat, preventing it from binding together and forcing them to remain evenly suspended in a liquid. Egg yolks are also 20% fat and add around 4 to 5 grams of fat each. Fat will stabilize proteins and prevent them from denaturing in a highly alcoholic or acidic environment. What does this all mean? It means the milk in eggnog will not clump together and get cheesy. Eggnog can be prepared and placed in the fridge to develop flavors further. Days and even weeks later, it will still look the same. The same can not be said for a milk punch. Milk punch will start to curdle after a few minutes. So it’s a trade-off. Milk punch is thinner and not so heavy, but it must be consumed immediately. Eggnog is a richer, thicker drink, but it has a long shelf life.

Recipe Resources

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Bourbon Punch – Classic Recipe

Bourbon Punch Cocktail

Bourbon Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

270

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Bourbon Punch Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 4 oz Black Tea

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients.
  • Pour into the serving glass filled with ice. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

I can’t find much of an origin on this one, but it seems most popular in the American south. If you read my main punch description, I describe how punch style cocktails have, for the most part, never worked in commercial settings. Most of these are only made in folks’ homes, so there are many variations and little written history. If you wanted to learn all the variations and try and get to a root, you would need to pop into southern folks’ homes, make it with them and chat them up. The oldest reference to tea and bourbon punch is hot and seems like a hot toddy. This is something I will do more research on in the future; this is a combination of all the best parts of all the different recipes I could find.

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Pisco Punch – Classic 1890s Recipe & History

Pisco Punch Cocktail

Pisco Punch

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

18%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Pisco Punch.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Gum Syrup

  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Pisco

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Pisco Punch.

Invented in the 1890s at the Bank Exchange Saloon in San Francisco, the Pisco Punch recipe was kept a closely guarded secret by its creator Duncan Nicol. Over time, people learned that Duncan Nicols punch contained Pisco, gum syrup, pineapple juice, and lemon juice, but the exact proportions have always remained hidden. Mr. Nicol would even pre-mix large drink containers in the backroom by himself so no one could see him make it. Some believed it even contained some cocaine. Once prohibition kicked in in 1920, Duncan Nicol shut the doors of the Bank Exchange Saloon and retired from bartending at the age of 65. Even after closing his bar, he never revealed the full recipe. So keep in mind that this is not the original recipe, but an assumption of what that original recipe could have been based on comparing all the different versions of the drink.

The Pisco Punch’s Secret Ingredient And Original Recipe.

No one knows the exact recipe for this cocktail, as its creator, Duncan Nicol, took it to the grave with him in 1926. Duncan Nicols went to great lengths to ensure his Pisco punch recipe stayed a secret and would pre-mix it alone. When he sold it, people began to guess that it most likely contained pisco, gum syrup, pineapple juice, and lemon juice. Many even believed it had cocaine as a secret ingredient to provide a bit of a pick me up. That wouldn’t be too unusual during that period as cocaine was not regulated, and several other beverages had it. (That’s actually how Coca-Cola started as an American version of French coca wine.) No one ever found out about the promotions, though the recipe I have provided here is an averaging of all the different variations of this cocktail. Averaging doesn’t always produce the best recipes, but I think it’s spot on.

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Jungle Juice – Recipe & History

Jungle Juice Cocktail

Jungle Juice

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

182

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an amazing Jungle Juice cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Guava Juice

  • 1/2 oz Papaya Juice

  • 1/2 oz Apricot Juice

  • 1/2 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 1/2 oz Apple Juice

  • 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 2 oz Gold Rum

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass and combine all the ingredients in the serving glass
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix

Notes

Featured Video

Everyone knows jungle juice is just a mix of whatever you have on hand. Well, believe it or not, jungle juice does have a history, and it Is made with whatever you have on hand. The name jungle juice was created during World War II by the American soldiers fighting in the pacific. There was no guarantee when your next supply shipment would come on these dense, heavily forested Islands or what would be in them. So they made do with whatever booze they got and whatever mixers (mostly fruit) they had around. Thus jungle juice was created. So it is correct that there is no official jungle juice recipe and an actual jungle juice is whatever you got mixed. I have provided here a fancy fruit juice recipe with booze, but you can do whatever the hell you want. If you don’t have any idea of what you wish to then hopefully, this recipe helps give you an idea.

Again, you can technically use whatever you want, but this is a fantastic recipe. Everyone I know who has had this is blown back by it, and then when I explain the whole jungle juice history are left very impressed. It is a lot of ingredients, but they all go together very well in the amounts I have listed.

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