Rusty Nail – Make The Original 1937 British Industries Fair Recipe

Rusty Nail Cocktail
Rusty Nail Cocktail

The best guess is the rusty nail was invented at the 1937 British Industries Fair and lived on in Britain for a couple more decades as the B.I.F. or a Drambuie and Scotch. It fell out of favor in Britain during the late 50s early 60s but grew in popularity in the USA during that same time. In the United States, it was called a Rusty Nail and one of the go-to drinks of the Rat Pack. They were solidifying it to Americans as a cool drink to order. No one knows why it’s called a rusty nail in the United States. There are a few guesses and fun-sounding stories about how it got its name. Like a bar, tender to lose his spoon and use a rusty nail to stir the drink, or some folks saying it could cure tetanus, but those are silly, not true.

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Rusty Nail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

216

kcal
ABV

40%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Rusty Nail.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Drambuie

  • 2 oz Scotch

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink
  • Strain into glass with a large ice cube.

Notes


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Rose – Make This Wonderful Raspberry Syrup Rose Cocktail

Rose Cocktail (American Version)
Rose Cocktail (American Version)

So I won’t lie; I don’t have any objective, concrete evidence to point to this being the American version of the Rose recipe. Honestly, the recipe for this cocktail is all over the place. Older books cite just the French and English versions, and later ones add the American version. The recipes are current, grenadine (pomegranate), cherry, and raspberry. So here is an explanation of why I broke the three up the way I did:

• Older books only mention the French or English version and they only mention currant or grenadine as the sweetener.
• I don’t see raspberry pop up until folks start mentioning an American version.
• Of the older books that mention the French and English versions, the French one is often associated with currant.

With that information, I figured my best bet was to associate French with currant, English with grenadine, and American with raspberry. Not to say I am right, but with all the time I have invested in figuring this out, this is the best I could come up with.

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Rose (Raspberry Version)

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

156

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Rose cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp

  • Raspberry Syrup
  • 2 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Kirschwasser

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Recipe Video

Notes


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Polichinelle – Make This Tasty 1922 Robert Vermeire Recipe

Polichinelle Cocktail
Polichinelle Cocktail

This recipe comes from Robert Vermeire and his 1922 book Cocktails and How to Mix Them. Written while he worked at the New York Embassy Club in London, this cocktail is named after the commedia dell’arte character Pulcinella. (Polichinelle is the French spelling of Pulcinella) This cocktail is pretty sweet, but it also has a decent amount of alcohol. If you like Porto, then this is right up your alley.

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Polichinelle

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Italian
Servings

1

servings
Calories

254

kcal
ABV

17%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Polichinelle cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz

  • Black Currant Liqueur
  • 2/3 oz

  • Kirschwasser
  • 1 oz

  • Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a separate mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients.
  • Pour into the serving glass. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes


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Patricia – Make This Wonderful Dry Vermouth Negroni

Patricia
Patricia

This is a dry variation of a Negroni. I like both equally and can’t say the Boulevardier is better or worse than the Patricia. It just depends on your mood.

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Patricia Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

174

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Patricia Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Campari
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Old Fashioned – Make This Beautiful Classic Cocktail and Learn It’s History

Old Fashioned
Old Fashioned

The History Of The Old Fashioned.

The Old Fashioned is an outstanding cocktail. The post-prohibition world’s best attempt at making a classic Whiskey Cocktail with what was still available after prohibition had killed off so many ingredients and techniques. Before people started calling this an Old Fashioned, it was just a Whiskey Cocktail. Prohibition brought about a massive paradigm shift in the way cocktails were made. Before the ratification of the 18th amendment and the start of prohibition, lightly flavored, high-quality spirits were popular among many drinkers. You can identify these vintage-style American cocktails by a couple of ounces of a base spirit lightly flavored with no more than 2 or 3 dashes of other flavorful ingredients and just enough sweetness to cut the spirit’s burn. With the start of prohibition in 1917, the quality of most liquor greatly diminished and high-quality spirits were priced out of most people’s range, and most trained bartenders left the profession and got jobs that were not illicit. Suddenly over night, there was a loss of quality products and knowledge. The cocktails that gained in popularity were the highball and sour style cocktails. Not to say they didn’t exist before this but prohibition had made them more popular. Highballs and sours were slightly easier to make and had more significant amounts of intensely flavored ingredients that helped mask the taste of poor quality spirits. The epitome of this is the tiki drink, which was created during prohibition and saw the first tiki bar open in Hollywood, CA, in 1933, immediately once prohibition ended. If an older individual wanted to order a whiskey cocktail like they remembered having before prohibition, they would need to ask for a whiskey cocktail made in the old fashion. Keep in mind that prohibition lasted for 16 years; a person turning 21 in 1917 was now 37. An entire drinking generation had grown up not having access to this kind of cocktail. If you are curious to learn more about the predecessor to this cocktail, then I would check out the Whiskey Cocktail

What Does The Old Fashioned Taste Like?

The Bourbon’s oak and caramel flavors are still the most forward flavors, but the Angostura bitters provide a dark, heavy, spicy, bark, earthy flavor. The simple syrup is just enough to cut the sharpness of the bourbon, but not to make this a sweet drink.

Using The Right Bourbon In An Old Fashioned.

The most essential ingredient in an Old Fashioned is the bourbon you use. The Bitters are crucial too, but the simple syrup and bitters are still subtle enough to add flavor to the bourbon rather than overpower the drink. You also don’t want to pick a bourbon that is too mellow or one that is too strong. The bitters will overwhelm you if it’s too smooth, and you lose the bourbon taste. If it’s too sharp, you’re trying to slowly sip and enjoy a bourbon not meant to be consumed slowly and thoroughly. A sharper spirit like that would be better suited for other cocktails with other much more assertive flavors.

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Old Fashioned Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Classic Old Fashioned.

Ingredients

  • Angostura Bitters
  • Simple Syrup
  • Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Monkey Gland – Make This Delicious 1930s Harry MacElhone Recipe

Monkey Gland
Monkey Gland

Invented in the 1920s by Harry MacElhone, this is an iconic Prohibition-era cocktail. Most of the great prohibition cocktails were not created in the United States but other countries. It was hard to stock a bar in the States then, and the booze one did get usually trash. This one comes from Harry’s New York Bar, located in Paris, France. Established by Scottish Bartender Harry MacElhone, Harry’s New York Bar was one of the hot spots in Paris for traveling Americans who wanted to get drunk.

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Monkey Gland

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

195

kcal
ABV

22

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Monkey Gland Cocktail by Harry MacElhone.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp

  • Absinthe
  • 1 tsp

  • Grenadine
  • 1.5 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1.5 oz

  • Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Manhattan – Make This Classic Prohibition Style Manhattan Cocktail

Manhattan
Manhattan

The History Of The Manhattan Cocktail.

The Manhattan most everyone thinks of when they order a Manhattan is not that old of a cocktail. It dates from about the 1930s and is the post-prohibition style Manhattan. Not to be confused with the pre-prohibition style Manhattan. From about the 1880s to 1919, Manhattan mainly remained unchanged till the start of prohibition, which brought about the loss of Boker’s bitters and no longer added a few dashes of orange liqueur.

The two changes that changed the Manhattan from its pre-prohibition to post-prohibition form are changing from Boker’s bitters to Angostura bitters and no longer adding two dashes of orange liqueur. The recipe changed from Boker’s bitters because the Boker’s company, which was already struggling financially by the 1910s, completely closed the doors around prohibition, and those who knew the secret recipe took it to their graves. I believe in the mid-2000s, an old unopened bottle of Boker’s was found and reverse engineered, so it is possible to make a similar cocktail to the pre-prohibition one, but for the last 90 years, this is the only one you could make, and thus, the flavor most of us are used to. The second change was removing the two dashes of orange liqueur. This change had more to do with the transition from pre-prohibition mixing ideologies to the prohibition era and post-prohibition mixing ideologies. The hallmark of pre-prohibition mixing ideology was to take an excellent base spirit and add complexity and flavor with small amounts of bitters and liqueurs, with the base spirit still the most forward element. Prohibition-era and post-prohibition mixing ideology shifted to making flavorful cocktails where the base spirit blended in with the sodas or liqueurs. These styles were exclusive to any period, but there was a definite shift in what was popular and sold.

There is no specific genesis of this particular recipe. Realistically it was just 1930s bartenders trying to make Manhattans similar to the ones the previous generation made while not having the same ingredients—a product of its time and now the standard method.

What Does The Manhattan Taste Like?

Bourbon and Sweet Vermouth are a match made in heaven. The two ingredients flavors profiles pair perfectly. The sweet vermouth adds just enough sweetness to soften the bourbon and the bourbon adds just enough sharp toasted oak volume and flavor to bring down the vermouths strong herbal notes. The addition of just a few dashes of Angostura bitters adds a nice spicy complexity to the cocktail. On their own these are all wonderful ingredients but the proportions elevate this to something out of this world.

What Is The Difference Between The Manhattan And Old Fashioned?

Whether its the pre-prohibition or post-prohibition style, the Manhattan and old fashion are, for the most part, very similar cocktails; the main difference between the two is since the old-fashioned uses simple syrup/gum syrup to cut the strength of the bourbon; the taste is still a very clean, bourbon forward cocktail. On the other hand, the Manhattan comes across with a more mild bourbon taste that is balanced against a lightly sweet herbal flavor. So the Manhattan is a slightly sweetened bourbon and herbal flavored cocktail, and the old fashion is a somewhat sweeter but clean bourbon tasting cocktail.

Using The Right Ingredients To Make a Manhattan.

The most essential ingredient in the post-prohibition style Manhattan is the sweet vermouth. The bitters are essential, but they don’t make or break the cocktail. A little bit more than the bitters, though, is the sweet vermouth. Sweet Vermouth that is too old will make this cocktail unpalatable, and the difference between normal vermouth and top self vermouth is like night and day. Vermouth is the defining flavor of this cocktail, and for not much more, you can buy some fantastic sweet vermouths. There isn’t a “bad” sweet vermouth, the cheap stuff is still pretty good, but for five bucks more, you can buy some fantastic top-shelf vermouths that will elevate this cocktail to new heights.

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Manhattan Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

193

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Post prohibition Manhattan Cocktail. While it is a more contemporary version of the cocktail, I personally feel it is the best one.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Angostura Bitters
  • 1 oz

  • Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink. Strain into glass.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Japanese Cocktail #2- Make This Delicious Prohibition Era Recipe

Japanese Cocktail Post-Prohibition Style
Japanese Cocktail Post-Prohibition Style

Jerry Thomas invented the Japanese Cocktail in the 1860s, but nothing about this cocktail is Japanese. None of the ingredients are from Japan or have any association with Japan. Some sources say it is named this to commemorate the first representative of Japan coming to the United States in the 1860s after the United States forced them to open their borders in 1853, but who the hell knows.

I like to imagine the name came about because the faint almond/cherry flavor the orgeat adds conjures up images of cherry blossom trees, but I am entirely making that up and in no way claim this to be true.

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Japanese Cocktail #2

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Post prohibition Japanese Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes

  • Angostura Bitters
  • 1/2 oz Orgeat

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink
  • Strain into glass.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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Japalac – Make This Tasty 1930s Classic Cocktail

Japalac Cocktail
Japalac Cocktail

This looks kind of like a little tiny tequila sunrise. It tastes like one, too, but just a little stronger. This drink dates back to the 1930s and is named after a super-strong, quick-dry wood stain brand.

The name seems to be a play on words, combining the racial slur for a Japanese person and the word lacquer because that brand of wood stain was made with Japan lacquer. That’s the old days for you.

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Japalac

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

16%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Japalac cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz

  • Orange Juice
  • 1 oz

  • Dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz

  • Bourbon
  • 1/2 oz

  • Grenadine

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass. Combine all ingredients in the mixing glass except the grenadine.
  • Stir the ingredients for 15 – 20 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into serving glass and gently pour in the grenadine so it settles on the bottom.

Notes


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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Boulevardier – Make The Original 1930s Erskine Gwynne Recipe

Boulevardier Cocktail
Boulevardier Cocktail

The History Of The Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier was invented in Paris in the early 1930s by an American journalist, Erskine Gwynne. It was made as a bourbon variation of the Negroni. The word boulevardier is a French term for a wealthy, fashionable socialite man. Similar to the English term “man about town,” It is easy to mispronounce the name if you don’t speak French ( I don’t, and I had to look it up the first time I heard of this drink ), but the phonetic way to say it is “bool-ah-vard-ee-a.” If you say this wrong the first few times, you are in good company because everyone struggles with the name of this cocktail at first, so Google it to hear someone say it.

How To Order A Boulevardier.

The Boulevardier is a very cool drink to order and has tricked people into thinking I am more sophisticated than I am. The Negroni has an old man connotation, but the boulevardier is what young high-class men order. In addition, any bar can make it. Every bar, from your small average corner bar to a high-class craft bar, and you won’t look out of place ordering it either. There are very few cocktails you can say that about. So if the bar has a liquor license, they can make the boulevardier. The bartender will already know what it is, and it will be made pretty well.

What Does The Boulevardier Taste Like?

The boulevardier is a very well-balanced tasting cocktail. The bitter medicinal flavor of the Campari is complimented nicely by the herbal sweet Vermouth, with a nice caramel-y, vanilla-y bourbon base. It’s a fantastic and straightforward drink worthy of all its praise. That being said, it is not for everyone. I like strong drinks and herbal flavors, which are perfect for someone like me. On the other hand, my wife is more a Moscow Mule kind of person, and she would never want a drink like this. If you like Manhattans or Negronis, you will love it, but if you are more of a rum and coke or Moscow mule kind of person, this cocktail, b will not like the boulevardier.

Variations of the Boulevardier.

Four popular varitions of the Boulevardier are:

  • Negroni
  • Americano
  • Man About Town
  • Patricia

The boulevardier is a variation of the Negroni, which predates the boulevardier by about ten years. The Negroni has a drier and more herbal taste than the boulevardier, but they are very similar. Another variation is the Americano which predates the Negroni and is the first cocktail to use Campri. The Americano was invented by Gaspare Campari himself and was initially called the Milano-Torino. It’s a different drink, though, and is a refreshing highball with a similar flavor profile. Very few people have heard of Patricia. It swaps the sweet vermouth for dry vermouth, making it a drier and slightly more herbal version of the Negroni. I like Negronis; then you may like this too.

A Nice Vermouth Makes A World Of Difference.

The most essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and while bourbon provides a nice vanilla and toasted oak base to the drink and does matter, it’s the sweet vermouth that will make the most significant difference. The strong Campari and vermouth flavors overpower the subtle bourbon flavors. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones out there. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it oxidizes after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of them spoil before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for an average 750mLs bottle of sweet vermouth, you will end up wasting half of it anyway, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

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Boulevardier

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

183

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the original Boulevardier. The perfect blend of sweet and bitter aperitifs with a nice bourbon base. 

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Campari

  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 1 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Add Ice To Mixing Glass and combine all ingredients in the mixing glass.
  • Stir the ingredients for 20 – 30 seconds to properly chill and dilute the drink.
  • Strain into glass.
  • Garnish with an expressed orange peel.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.