Red Fassionola Syrup Recipe

Red Fashionola
Red Fashionola

The History Of Jonathan English Fassionola

Fassionola was a line of tropical syrups made by the San Diego-based Jonathan English company. Jonathan English made Gold, Red, and Green fassionola syrup, each with a unique flavor. The gold was primarily passion fruit flavored, the red was fruit punch, and the green was mainly lime and guava. It is widely rumored that the Jonathan English company went out of business, and it was, but before the company went entirely out of business, it was bought by a new owner. I learned this from a Reddit post. The new owner still makes the classic Jonathan English red, green and gold fassionolas. As of writing this, there is an eBay seller who ships these original fassionolas, and here is the website of the distributor of Johathan English, but it seems distribution is limited to the San Diego area.

It’s not uncommon to find individuals who want fassionola to make their own. I’ve made my own, and it turns out pretty good. Again considering there is no definitive recipe for fassionola, make something fun and tropical. I built my recipes knowing that red is supposed to be fruit punch, gold is passion fruit, and green is lime and guava.

How I Came To This Recipe.

Like any food or drink, there is no single recipe, and most have their own variation. While Johnathan English fassionola was the go-to for most tiki bars back in the day, it doesn’t mean you can’t make your own or that it has to be 100% like Johnathan English. I made this recipe up entirely out of what sounded good while trying to highlight the primary flavor for each color of fassionola. With red fassionola in mind, I looked at the classic Red Hawaiian Punch ingredient list, saw what juices it had listed, and made those the ingredients.

Specific to red fassionola, I made half the volume cherry and strawberry juice and the other half the Hawaiian punch juice mix. The resulting syrup is a beautiful red color with a complex flavor and a clear cherry strawberry taste. The nice thing about cherries is they have a strong red color. This lets the red fassionola be colored red more naturally than using dye. Red dye would be fine, too, if you want to make red fassionola without a cherry flavor. Strawberries have a weak red color that quickly oxidizes, so the cherries provide all the color.

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Red Fassionola

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

15

servings
Calories

200

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

How to make a homemade Red Fassionola

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Guava Juice

  • 2 oz Papaya Juice

  • 2 oz Apricot Juice

  • 2 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 2 oz Apple Juice

  • 2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Orange Juice

  • 6 oz Cherry Juice

  • 6 oz Strawberry Puree/Juice

  • 3 cups Granulated Sugar

Directions

  • Combine all the juices together.
  • Run juice through a jelly bag to remove small particles.
  • In a stovetop pot, over low heat, add the sugar and stir till fully dissolved.
  • Bottle and store it in the refrigerator or in the freezer for long-term storage.
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Cocktails That Use Red Fassionola


Gold Fassionola Syrup Recipe

Gold Fashionola
Gold Fashionola

The History Of Jonathan English Fassionola

Fassionola was a line of tropical syrups made by the San Diego-based Jonathan English company. Jonathan English made Gold, Red, and Green fassionola syrup, each with a unique flavor. The gold was primarily passion fruit flavored, the red was fruit punch, and the green was mainly lime and guava. It is widely rumored that the Jonathan English company went out of business, and it was, but before the company went entirely out of business, it was bought by a new owner. I learned this from a Reddit post. The new owner still makes the classic Jonathan English red, green and gold fassionolas. As of writing this, there is an eBay seller who ships these original fassionolas, and here is the website of the distributor of Johathan English, but it seems distribution is limited to the San Diego area.

It’s not uncommon to find individuals who want fassionola to make their own. I’ve made my own, and it turns out pretty good. Again considering there is no definitive recipe for fassionola, make something fun and tropical. I built my recipes knowing that red is supposed to be fruit punch, gold is passion fruit, and green is lime and guava.

How I Came To This Recipe.

Like any food or drink, there is no single recipe, and most have their own variation. While Johnathan English fassionola was the go-to for most tiki bars back in the day, it doesn’t mean you can’t make your own or that it has to be 100% like Johnathan English. I made this recipe up entirely out of what sounded good while trying to highlight the primary flavor for each color of fassionola. With red fassionola in mind, I looked at the classic Red Hawaiian Punch ingredient list, saw what juices it had listed, and made those the ingredients.

Specific to gold fassionola, I made half the volume passion fruit juice and the other half the Hawaiian punch juice mix. The resulting syrup is a beautiful gold color with a complex flavor and a clear passion fruit taste.

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Gold Fassionola

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

15

servings
Calories

200

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

How to make a homemade Gold Fassionola

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Papaya Juice

  • 2 oz Apricot Juice

  • 2 oz Apple Juice

  • 2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Orange Juice

  • 2 oz Guava Juice

  • 12 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 3 cups Granulated Sugar

Directions

  • Combine all the juices together.
  • Run juice through a jelly bag to remove small particles.
  • In a stovetop pot, over low heat, add the sugar and stir till fully dissolved.
  • Bottle and store it in the refrigerator or in the freezer for long-term storage.
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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Cocktails That Use Gold Fassionola


Green Fassionola Syrup Recipe

Green Fashionola
Green Fashionola

The History Of Jonathan English Fassionola

Fassionola was a line of tropical syrups made by the San Diego-based Jonathan English company. Jonathan English made Gold, Red, and Green fassionola syrup, each with a unique flavor. The gold was primarily passion fruit flavored, the red was fruit punch, and the green was mainly lime and guava. It is widely rumored that the Jonathan English company went out of business, and it was, but before the company went entirely out of business, it was bought by a new owner. I learned this from a Reddit post. The new owner still makes the classic Jonathan English red, green and gold fassionolas. As of writing this, there is an eBay seller who ships these original fassionolas, and here is the website of the distributor of Johathan English, but it seems distribution is limited to the San Diego area.

It’s not uncommon to find individuals who want fassionola to make their own. I’ve made my own, and it turns out pretty good. Again considering there is no definitive recipe for fassionola, make something fun and tropical. I built my recipes knowing that red is supposed to be fruit punch, gold is passion fruit, and green is lime and guava.

How I Came To This Recipe.

Like any food or drink, there is no single recipe, and most have their own variation. While Johnathan English fassionola was the go-to for most tiki bars back in the day, it doesn’t mean you can’t make your own or that it has to be 100% like Johnathan English. I made this recipe up entirely out of what sounded good while trying to highlight the primary flavor for each color of fassionola. With red fassionola in mind, I looked at the classic Red Hawaiian Punch ingredient list, saw what juices it had listed, and made those the ingredients.

Specific to green fassionola, I made half the volume a mix of lime and guava and the other half the Hawaiian punch juice mix. The resulting syrup is not green, so I added green food dye. Green is almost impossible to make flavorless and naturally, so green food dye is your best option. There is nothing wrong with using food dye to enhance color when appropriate.

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Green Fassionola

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

15

servings
Calories

200

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

How to make a homemade Green Fassionola

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Papaya Juice

  • 2 oz Apricot Juice

  • 2 oz Passion Fruit Juice

  • 2 oz Apple Juice

  • 2 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Orange Juice

  • 6 oz Guava Juice

  • 6 oz Lime Juice

  • 4-5 drops Green Food Dye

  • 3 cups Granulated Sugar

Directions

  • Combine all the juices together.
  • Run juice through a jelly bag to remove small particles.
  • Add green food dye to color and then add 1 or 2 extra drops to concentrate the color for mixing.
  • In a stovetop pot, over low heat, add the sugar and stir till fully dissolved.
  • Bottle and store it in the refrigerator or in the freezer for long-term storage.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Cocktails That Use Green Fassionola


Vanilla Syrup Recipe – Flavorful & Easy

vanilla syrup
vanilla syrup

How To Make Vanilla Syrup.

The most common sugar to water syrup ratios are 1:1, 3:2, and 2:1. A equal part of sugar and water, 1:1 is a bit thin, doesn’t last as long from mold as the others, and offers less sweetening potential. I don’t care for 1:1, and it’s usually just made this way because it doesn’t need to be heated and is cheap. The next one is 3:2. so three parts sugar to 2 parts water. This is perhaps the best ratio as it offers a similar sweetening potential as 2:1 without any of the issues 2:1 has. This syrup ratio does need to be heated to dissolve the sugar fully, but once it is dissolved, it will not recrystallize. Most of the classic late 1800s and early 1900s syrups were 3:2. The last ratio is 2:1. This syrup ratio needs to be heated to dissolve the sugar too fully. Unfortunately, once it cools, the sugar crystals can reform and form hard clumps of sugar crystals in your syrup. 2:1 syrups’ best feature is their very long shelf life. There is a high enough concentration of sugar that most bacteria are killed, and mold won’t form for a few weeks.

Once you have picked the syrup ratio you want and made it, add the vanilla extract and stir till fully incorporated. It’s that simple. Be aware that the standard extract to syrup ratio is 1:30. So for every 30 oz of syrup, add 1 oz of extract. That ratio can be easily scaled for different volumes. For example, for 2 cups of syrup (16 oz/480 mLs), add around a half ounce (15 mLs) of extract.

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Vanilla Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

20

servings
Calories

90

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

The easiest way to make vanilla syrup.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Granulated Sugar

  • 11 oz Water

  • 1 tbsp Vanilla Extract

  • 1/4 tsp Cream of TarTar (Tartaric Acid)

Directions

  • Combine sugar and water in a saucepan and under gentle heat stir till the sugar is fully dissolved.
  • While still warm add the cream of tartar and stir to combine.
  • Once the syrup has cooled add the vanilla extract and stir till it is fully combined. Bottle and refrigerate.
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  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Cocktails That Use Vanilla Syrup


Related Post

Gum Syrup (Gomme Syrup) Recipe

Gum Syrup
Gum Syrup

How To Make Gum Syrup (Gomme Syrup).

Gum syrup is straightforward to make. It just takes a little time to reconstitute the dried gum arabic powder. To begin with, mix dried gum acacia powder with equal parts of water. Mix the two until there are only a few clumps left, then let it sit for a couple of hours. The lumps will dissolve after a couple of hours. Once the gum is fully dissolved you will have a good working liquid gum arabic. The typical amount of liquid gum arabic to add is 20% of the volume you are adding it to. So if you plan to make 2 cups (480 mLs) of syrup, then you would add 80 mLs of liquid gum arabic to 400 mLs of simple syrup, which will result in desired 480 mLs of syrup. Also, know that gum arabic and gum acacia are the same thing. Gum arabic is just the older name for it.

The next thing to prepare is your syrup. The most common sugar to water syrup ratios are 1:1, 3:2, and 2:1. 1:1 is equal part of sugar and water. It’s a bit thin, doesn’t last as long from mold as the others, and offers less sweetening potential. I don’t care for 1:1, and it’s usually just made this way because it’s fast, doesn’t need to be heated, and is cheap. The next one is 3:2. so 3 parts sugar to 2 parts water. This is perhaps the best ratio as it offers a similar sweetening potential as 2:1 without any of the issues 2:1 has. This syrup ratio does need to be heated to dissolve the sugar fully, but once it is dissolved, the sugar will not recrystallize. Most of the classic late 1800s and early 1900s syrups were 3:2. The last ratio is 2:1. This syrup ratio needs to be heated to dissolve the sugar fully. Unfortunately, it’s so concentrated that once it cools, the sugar crystals can reform into hard clumps of sugar crystals in your syrup. 2:1 syrups’ best feature is their very long shelf life. There is a high enough concentration of sugar that most bacteria are killed, and mold won’t form for a few weeks.

Once you have made the syrup ratio you want, combine the syrup and liquid gum arabic in a blender and blend for 1 minute. Transfer to a container, and that is it.

Gum Syrup vs. Simple Syrup.

The only difference between gum syrup and standard simple syrup is the addition of gum arabic. Gum arabic, or gum acacia, is the dried sap of the acacia tree and is a thick, insoluble fiber. It adds no significant flavor to the syrup but it adds a more viscous mouthfeel to cocktails. If you are downing the cocktail, the mouthfeel can be hard to notice, but it’s equatable to a red wine mouth feel vs. a white wine mouthfeel. When comparing wines, people usually talk about a thick or thin body. What they are really talking about malolactic acid vs. malic acid (gum syrup does not have malolactic or malic acid, I’m just using this as an example). Malic acid is more commonly associated with white wine, has a thin body, and feels like holding a sip of apple juice in your mouth. Malolactic acid is most associated with red wines, has a thicker body, and feels like holding a sip of milk in your mouth. So if you make a cocktail with gum syrup, that is the mouth feel to look for. Hold a sip in your mouth and notice if it feels like milk or apple juice. The mouth feel gum syrup adds is the same as red wines mouthfeel, and standard syrup without a gum is the same as white wines mouthfeel.

Gum Arabic has a high acidity (4-4.5), so it offers preservative properties I will mention below. Still, outside a small change to mouthfeel/body, it’s not that different from the standard simple syrup. The two can easily be substituted for the other with almost no noticeable difference.

Does Xanthan Gum Work For Making Gum Syrup?

Long story short. Not really. The idea is appealing, though. Xanthan gum is cheap, mixes very quickly, and you need much less xanthan gum to get similar results to gum in Arabic. Both xanthan gum and gum Arabic are stabilizers that prevent the merging of oil and water molecules. Still, they behave differently once diluted beyond their effective range and even do a few unexpected things. I’ll explain how this relates to making cocktails.

Stabilizers such as starches, gums, pectin, and gelatins work by separating smaller oil and water molecules and preventing them from reforming together. Which makes them looked mix. These large stabilizer molecules don’t change the surface tension of water or oil, they just stop the water and oil molecules from having any space to coalesce. This is also why they are used as thickeners for foods. Because they work by separating oil and water, they must constitute a certain percentage of the volume of the final mixture. Gum Arabic is an effective stabilizer between 10% and 20% of a mixture’s volume. So if you have 400 grams of water and oil you are trying to emulsify; you would need to add 40 – 80 grams of gum arabic. Xanthan gum is effective at 0.01% and 0.02%. Xanthan gum is used in tiny amounts. So using the above example, you would only need around half a gram to 1 gram of xanthan gum for 400 grams of water and oil. Again these stabilizers work great until they are under, or over, their effective range. Like how a cocktail mixed with 1 oz of 20% gum syrup, 2 oz gin, and 1 oz lemon juice will have a final percentage of gum arabic of 3%. Well below the 10% minimum. I did a few experiments on this with gum arabic, xanthan gum, and a control syrup with no gum, and here is what I found.

Even with the low gum arabic percentage, cocktails with particulate, like from the juice of a lemon, stayed in a decent suspension longer than my controlled standard simple syrup and gum syrup with xanthan gum. The xanthan gum syrup would sometimes clarify the cocktail. I couldn’t get it to do this consistently or even understand why this happened, but some drinks clarified. I made hot buttered rum to test the syrups in a warm fat rich drink, and soon after mixing, all the butter and spices bonded together and solidified at the top. This happened with other cocktails too, but not all the time, or in a way, I could find a pattern. There was also no mouthfeel with the xanthan gum the same way there was with gum acacia.
All in all, xanthan gum syrup performed worse than my control simple syrup without gums. Every cocktail I made with gum arabic performed very well. The hot buttered rum’s oil stayed emulsified for a long time, with less fat settling at the top than the control simple syrup. Foams that formed on top from shaking lasted longer too with gum acerbic syrup. I also did an experiment where I mixed pure cinnamon oil in gum arabic and xanthan gum. I then added a large amount of water to see how each handled the mixing of oil and water. The gum arabic oil mixture stayed perfectly emulsified even after several hours while the xanthan gum oil mixture instantly separated, and the oil all floated to the top.

All in all, gum arabic simple syrup improved the emulsification and looked of every drink I used it in. I love xanthan gum for cooking and think it’s one of the best gums available. Still, specifically to cocktails, it is detrimental to the quality of the drink.

TLDR is gum arabic made every cocktail better while xanthan gum somehow made them worse. No gum was better than using xanthan gum in a mixed drink. When the xanthan gum was diluted to a level far lower than its effective percentage of 0.01 or 0.02, it behaved oddly and even clarified some drinks. Don’t use xanthan gum for gum syrup.

The Purpose Of Adding Gum Arabic to Simple Syrup.

People often talk about the mouthfeel gum syrup adds, but it also works as a preservative. Gum syrup isn’t as common as it was in the past, and refrigeration is the main reason for that. Commercial refrigeration was invented in the 1850s, but it didn’t become scaled-down and more common till much later. Preservation of food was more difficult, and syrups would spoil very quickly. one way to preserve a syrup while not changing the quality of it too much was to add gum arabic to it. Gum arabic has an acidic PH of around 4 to 4.5, enough to kill most germs. Another method to lengthen the life of syrups was to add tartaric acid (cream of tartar) and lower the PH even more. By combining gum syrup with tartaric acid, the syrup PH could be lowered to that ideal 4.5 PH range and it would keep for quite some time without refrigeration.

Gum arabic also modified the mouthfeel of cocktails and gave a desirable full-body texture similar to red wine. The easiest way to describe it is gum syrup gives a red wine mouthfeel, while standard simple syrup gives a white wine mouthfeel. The red wine’s full body mouthfeel is compared to the mouthfeel of milk, while the white wine’s thinner mouthfeel is compared to the mouthfeel of apple juice. So if you ever want to experience that texture, hold a sip of a cocktail in your mouth and notice if it feels like milk or apple juice.

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Gum Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

4

servings
Calories

300

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

The easiest way to make gum syrup.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz Granulated Sugar

  • 11 oz Water

  • 2.5 oz Liquid Gum Arabic

  • 1/4 tsp Cream of TarTar (tartaric acid)

Directions

  • Combine sugar and water in a saucepan and under gentle heat stir till the sugar is fully dissolved.
  • While still warm add the cream of tartar and stir to combine.
  • Once the syrup has cooled, pour it into a blender, add the liquid gum arabic, and blend for 1 minute. Bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.
  • To make liquid gum arabic combine equal parts by weight of powdered gum arabic and water. Stir, there will be clumps, but let it sit for several hours and it will fully dissolve.
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Cocktails That Use Gum Syrup


Related Post

Orgeat – Recipe & History

Orgeat Syrup
Orgeat Syrup

The History Of Orgeat.

Orgeat began as barley water. Its name comes from the Latin word hordeaceus, which translates to “of barley” or instead made of barley. Over time the barley water became sweeter, and variations emerged. One of these variations is the Spanish tiger nut horchata and the almond orzata/orgeat. The English word orgeat comes from the word orge, Which is French for barley. In parts of northern Africa, “rozata” is an almond drink typically prepared for weddings or special occasions. Most countries along the Mediterranean Sea have some barley/nut drink whose romantic name is derived from the Latin word hordeaceus. Over time, these nut juices were sweetened and concentrated into a syrup that could be used in many different drinks.

The earliest reference to orgeat in the Americas that I can find is from a 1779 newspaper article detailing the goods sold in a shop in Newport, R.I. The particular store owner was a man named Nathan Hart, and he even had orgeat listed under the “Liqueurs” section and not the standard grocery. This shows that orgeat was used in alcoholic drinks even in the 18th century, predating Jerry Thomas’s early use of it by 80 years. Orgeat’s use as a sweetener in American-style mixed drinks most likely originated in the late 18th century.

The Dangers Of Bitter Almonds

Bitter Almonds are very poisonous. Each seed contains around 4 mg of cyanide. Depending on body weight and size, just ten bitter almonds (or less) are enough to kill a grown man. The formation of hydrogen cyanide in bitter almonds is a defensive measure from the plant to ensure that animals do not eat its seeds. Many plants do this, and it would surprise you to find out how many plants we regularly eat contain cyanide. Specific to almonds, though, all plant seeds in the Rosaceae family contain high amounts of cyanide. This includes apples, cherries, apricots, pears, peaches, etc. A bitter almond seed contains a carbohydrate called Amygdalin and an enzyme called Emulsin. Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) is formed when the seed’s cell walls are broken, the emulsin and amygdalin mix, and the amygdalin is broken down. The byproducts of amygdalin breakdown are Benzaldehyde (the bitter almond/cherry flavor) and Hydrogen cyanide (The poisonous gas part). It is essential to have a cyanide test kit to know precisely how much cyanide is present, and if you are unfamiliar with working with bitter almonds, then it is best to leave them out.

How To Make An Amazing Orgeat

The desirable qualities of a good orgeat are to be rich and creamy with a high amount of emulsified almond fat and to have a distinctive bitter almond/cherry flavor. There are several ways to achieve this.

It needs to be cooked for a bit to get a creamy high-fat orgeat. It takes heat and time to melt the almond oils out of a nut, so a few minutes of cooking isn’t going to cut it. The mixture should simmer for at least 30 to 45 minutes to adequately heat the oils out. Seeping/infusing the nuts in water doesn’t work either because water does not dissolve oil. Sweet almonds have 50% more fat than bitter almonds, so a blend of sweet and bitter almonds is traditionally used to achieve the desired fat to flavor ratio. It helps to grind the nut down as small as possible, but it still takes heat and time to melt the fat, swell the cells with hot water, and push the almond fat out. A stick blender helps break down the pieces to their smallest size.

To get a pleasantly bitter almond cherry flavor, bitter almonds are traditionally used, but bitter almond extract is a safer way to get the same taste. The chemical responsible for that flavor is Benzaldehyde. The breakdown of amygdalin creates Benzaldehyde, but Hydrogen Cyanide is also made in that process. Hydrogen Cyanide needs to be boiled off to ensure the mixture is safe, and testing must be done to validate its safety. I’ll be honest. I was thinking about publishing a traditional North African orgeat recipe, but I have decided not to as the risk is greater than zero. If not prepared properly, it can be dangerous. Keeping bitter almonds around can be dangerous if children are present as they could find them and try to eat them; they need to be ground up and cooked correctly (evaporating the cyanide while minimizing the oxidation of benzaldehyde takes a gentle touch), and proper testing must be done of the syrup. It needs to be cooked in a well-ventilated area. That is asking too much of the casual mixologist who wants to make some at home. Alternatively, bitter almond extract can be used to add bitter almond flavor without the risk. Therefore that will be the recipe I will provide. The result is similar enough that it’s hard to tell the difference, it’s easy to add bitter almond extract, and it has none of the same risks.

It is also preferable to blanc the seeds and remove the almond skins. The almond seeds’ outer skin is bitter and offers no desirable flavor. Almond skins can also cause nettle rash in some individuals when eaten. It is easy to find blanched almonds and preground almond flour, but removing the skins yourself is easy. Pour boiling water on top of the seed and let them sit for a few minutes. The skins quickly absorb the hot water and swell up. This detaches the skins from the seeds and makes the skins easy to rub off with just your fingers.

Recipe Resources

NOTE: The book linked below is an amazing resource. If cooking, baking or making your own drink ingredients is something, you want to get into or improve your knowledge of I highly recommend it.

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Orgeat

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

15

servings
Calories

80

kcal
Total time

1

hour 

Learn how to make flavorful orgeat.

Ingredients

  • 2.5 oz Fine Ground Sweet Almonds

  • 12 oz Water

  • 12 oz White Sugar

  • 1 tsp Bitter Almond Extract

  • 1.5 tsp Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 tsp Rose Water

  • Optional Ingredients
  • 1.5 oz Liquid Gum Arabic

  • 3 g Lecithin

Directions

  • First blanch the almonds to remove the skin, then using a food processor or blender, grind the almonds into a fine flour.
  • Combine the almond flour and water in a saucepan. cover the top and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes. Add more water if needed. 
  • Over a large bowl, line a mesh strainer with cheesecloth and pour the mixture in. Let it sit for a bit to cool.
  • Once the mixture has cool, so as not to burn yourself, squeeze and press the cheesecloth to remove any additional almond fat. Optionally add the lecithin at this point and whisk to combine.
  • Measure the amount of fluid. The goal is to have 1.5 cups. Water evaporated and soaked the almonds during the cooking process so add more to bring it up to 1.5 cups.
  • Add the remaining ingredients and whisk together. Optionally add gum syrup and blend everything in a blender. Bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.
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  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

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Related Post

Clear Ice Cubes – Easy Perfect Ice

Clear Ice Cubes
Clear Ice Cubes

How To Make Clear Ice.

The only way to make clear ice is to freeze water in one direction so that the dissolved oxygen is pushed back. Water put in an ice tray will freeze from the outside in. This traps the dissolved air in the cube’s center, which gives it a cloudy look. By freezing in one direction, air never gets stuck in the ice.

The easiest way to freeze in one direction is to freeze the water slowly from the top down in an insulated cooler. An insulated cooler prevents the sides and bottom from freezing and forces the water to freeze from the top down. It can take a day or two to freeze the top layer, but the result will be a nice transparent thick layer of ice on the top. It’s just that simple.

The reason water freezes from the top-down have to do with its density at different temperatures. Water, like anything else, gets denser as it gets colder, but once it freezes, it crystallizes and expands, becoming less dense. This is why icebergs and ice cubes float. At 15°C, water has a density of 999.1 kg/m3. At 1°C, it gets heavier at 999.9 kg/m3, but once it freezes at -1°C, it expands to a weight of 998.12 kg/m3. As a result, cooler water will always drop, and warmer water will always rise to the top. The top layer of water will cool and fall, and the next layer will rise to the top to cool till it drops. This cycle continues until all the water in the cooler drops to 1°C. At this point, there is no more warm water to replace the dropping cold water, and the top layer will crystalize and freeze. Each new layer of ice will expand and freeze to the topmost layer of ice. The water’s expanding and freezing cycle continues from the top-down, forming a crystal transparent top layer of ice. Air will not crystalize or bond to the other ice, so it is pushed down. Air Will continue to get pushed down till it has nowhere else to go, thus forming cloudy-looking air bubbles.

What Type Of Mold Makes Clear Ice?

No ice mold makes clear ice. The only way to get clear ice is to freeze it from the top down. Any mold can be placed at the top of an insulated cooler filled with water to make clear ice. The mold needs a hole in the bottom for the dissolved air to be pushed through.

What Are The Benefits Of Clear Ice?

The two main benefits of clear ice is it melts slower and is visually more appealing. The truth is that clear ice melts at the same rate regardless of whether it is clear. It seems to melt slower because clear ice is all frozen water, while cloudy ice is a mix of frozen water and cold air. For this reason, a clear cube will weigh more than a cloudy cube, and extra water keeps its temperature longer. The trapped cold air will not hold at all, and once it is freed from the ice, it releases into the atmosphere. To provide numbers, water requires 4,200 joules of energy to change a kilogram of water by 1°C. Air-only requires 1,006 joules of energy to change the same air mass by 1°C. It’s not that the ice is melting slower. There is more of it to slow down the melting process.

Does Distilled Water Makes Clear Ice?

The mineral content has nothing to do with the clarity of the ice. Again the main cloudiness comes from the trapped air bubbles. If the water is frozen slowly in a large insulated container, the dissolved minerals are pushed down as the water freezes, similar to the dissolved gas. Using distilled water would only make and if the ice cubes were made the usual way by placing an ice tray in the freezer with the whole cube freezing. Technically there should be a difference, but I have personally never noticed a difference between using distilled and regular water, even when making regular cubes.

I have noticed a big difference between ice cubes made from the water straight from the tap and water that rested on the counter for an hour. This is because while in the pipe, water is under 4x the pressure it would be under in a typical atmospheric environment. This increased pressure results in more dissolved gas in the water. Similar to how carbonated beverages are bottled under pressure to maintain their carbonation, most of that carbonation escapes once they are opened. Water that has rested on the counter for an hour is more effective than distilled water. You’ll even see the dissolved bubbles reforming and concentrating inside the glass.

Should I Boil Water To Make Clear Ice?

If you are freezing the water slowly, then hot water does not matter. Although if you are freezing the water rapidly, like in a typical ice tray, starting with hot water will result in a clearer cube. This has to do with internal and atmospheric pressures: the more significant the relative atmospheric pressure, the more dissolved gas in the water. Typical water pipes are around 60PSI (41kPa), 4x atmospheric pressure at sea level. For this reason, there will be 4x the amount of dissolved air in water from the tap than in the water left on the counter for a few hours. This can be observed by filling a glass of water from the tap and then leaving it on the counter to decompress. After an hour, air bubbles will form inside the glass due to atmospheric pressure.

Boiling is loosely related to temperature and results from when the vapor phase pressure equals atmospheric pressure. This is why 100°C and 212°F are measured at sea level. Water boils at lower temperatures at higher elevations and higher temperatures when under increased pressure. More dissolved gas is dispersed by increasing the internal pressure relative to the atmospheric pressure. If the hot water is quickly added to an ice tray and placed in the freezer, the outside of the cube quickly freezes, sealing out the atmospheric gas. It’s not perfect, but it will result in a more transparent cube than a cube made from room temperature water. Then again, if frozen slowly in a large insulated container, the temperature makes no difference.

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Clear Ice Cubes

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

0

kcal
Total time

15

minutes

Learn the easy way to make perfectly crystal clear ice cubes

Ingredients

  • 2 Gallon Water

  • 1-3 Unit Ice Molds

  • 1 Unit 9 qt. Insulated Cooler

Directions

  • Punch 2-3 small holes in the bottom of the ice molds for dissolved air to move through.
  • Position molds at the top of a small insulated cooler.
  • Fill the cooler with water to the top of the ice molds and place in the freezer.
  • Let the water slowly freeze for 24 – 48 hours till the molds are completely frozen.
  • Remove the Ice molds and remove the crystal clear ice cubes.

Recipe Video

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Cream of Coconut – Easy Flavorful Recipe

Cream of Coconut
Cream of Coconut

Should I Buy Cream Of Coconut Or Make It?

Always make your own syrup. Never buy syrup, but it’s ok to buy this one if you want to. Coco Lopez and Coco Real are both pretty good products, but the homemade stuff is better. The ingredients in a homemade cream of coconut are much better too. If you have the ingredients and 10 minutes, make your own. If you need to go to the store to buy cream of coconut anyway, you can purchase the ingredients instead and make a much better product.

The Difference Between Cream Of Coconut, Coconut Cream, Coconut Milk, and Coconut Water.

While they all sound similar, coconut water, coconut milk, coconut cream, and cream of coconut are very different. Exactly what coconuts are processed into depends on how mature the coconut is. Coconuts are only harvested when they are young or old. Young green coconuts are sweeter and have more sweet tasty water and less fatty meat. Older brown coconuts have less sweet delicious water and more fatty meat. Check out the differences below to know what each one is used for.

1). Cream Of Coconut

Cream of coconut is coconut syrup like the white coconut syrup used on top of pancakes, in desserts, and in drinks. Making cream of coconut with coconut cream results in a dense and overly fatty syrup. Coconut milk works better for making cream of coconut.

Your standard cream of coconut is just equal parts coconut milk and sugar. If you are making this at home, a normal-size can of coconut milk is about 400 grams (≈ 1.5 Cups). So combine 400 grams of coconut milk and 400 grams of sugar. Gently heat the mixture and stir till the sugar is fully dissolved.

If you want to take it a step further, try adding an emulsifier, a little salt, and a small amount of coconut extract. An emulsifier will make the coconut fat water soluble, which helps it mix better and stay evenly suspended in the final mix drink. Not as noticeable in blended drinks, but it does help for shaken and strained drinks like the Acapulco or Coco Loco. And a little bit of salt and coconut extract helps intensify the coconut flavor without adding volume.

2). Coconut Cream

Coconut cream is made from just older brown coconuts. It’s mostly coconut fats; it is unsweetened and has a deep rich coconut flavor. They are usually used for cooking and thickening soups or curries. This is a bit too fatty to be used to make the sweetened cream of coconuts for cocktails. Coconut milk is better for that.

3). Coconut Milk

Coconut milk is made from both green and older brown coconuts. Coconut milk is made by combining the water of green coconuts with the fatty meat of older brown coconuts. I used to think the coconuts were just harvested at the halfway point, but that’s not the case. Coconuts are harvested either young or old, and coconut milk is a mix of the two. Coconut milk is excellent for cooking and making drinks. It’s sweet and fatty, so it’s a perfect middle ground between the two. Use coconut milk to make a cream of coconut. It’s the right balance of fat and water.

4). Coconut Water

The coconut water you buy at a store to drink is the fluid inside a coconut and is processed from only young green coconuts. Coconut water is usually harvested from 6-month-old green coconut. Coconut water is pretty Healthy. It’s high in potassium, magnesium, and manganese, suitable for your bones, blood pressure, heart, hydration, etc. Most everyone knows coconut water is a healthier alternative to sugary beverages but Google it for more exact information. If you drink too much, the worst is that you get diarrhea. Also, you can not make a cream of coconut with this.

What Are Some Cream Of Coconut Substitutes?

The two main store-bought cream of coconuts are Coco Lopez and Coco Real. Coco Real has slightly better ingredients, but Coco Lopez is the original. For the most part, though, they are pretty similar, and so are all the other smaller brands. If you have coconut cream but don’t feel like making a whole thing of cream of coconut (I know the names are too similar), then split the cream of coconut volume between coconut cream and simple syrup. Pew, that was difficult to write, so I imagine it was hard to read. Here is an example of what I am saying. If your pina colada recipe calls for 4 oz cream of coconut, then add 2 oz coconut cream and 2 oz of simple syrup.

As far as substituting cream of coconut entirely, try using evaporated milk. It’s very similar to cream of coconut and can be substituted 1:1 directly. The other option is to leave it out entirely if the drink still works. It can’t be left out of a pina colada (you can’t make the drink without it), but an Acapulco is just as good with cream of coconut as it is without.

The Benefits Of Adding An Emulsifier.

Cream of coconut can be made by adding sugar and coconut milk together, which would be great. Unfortunately, It will separate from the rest of the liquid in a cold drink. Coconut fats start to solidify at a pretty warm 75f (24c), which needs to be kept above that to stay liquid. Cocktails are much cooler than that, so once a cocktail is chilled, the fats will turn solid and clump together. That’s not a big deal in blended drinks, but it’s pronounced in shaken drinks or stirred ones. This is why drinks like the pearl diver, pina colada, blue Hawaiian, etc., are all blended.

The solution to this is to add an emulsifier. Common emulsifiers in food are lecithin and casein. These are naturally present in foods like eggs and milk but can be bought online as purified powders. Lecithin powder is pretty easy to get and easy to work with. Use 1% of lecithin to the amount you are looking to emulsify. So to emulsify 400g of coconut milk or butter, add 4g of lecithin and thoroughly mix. Bonding lecithin to the fats (or water) will ensure that the fats stay evenly suspended and incorporated in the final drink. It makes the fats water soluble and opens these ingredients to use beyond just being blended.

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Cream of Coconut

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

16

servings
Calories

130

kcal
Total time

10

minutes

Make the best cream of coconut.

Ingredients

  • 400 g White Sugar

  • 400 g Coconut Milk

  • 2 g Salt

  • Optional Ingredients
  • 2 mLs Coconut Extract

  • 4 g Lecithin

Directions

  • Basic Recipe
  • Combine the coconut milk and sugar in a pan. If using lecithin, first blend coconut milk with Lecithin and whisk together till the lecithin is fully incorporated, and then combine the coconut milk and sugar in a pan.
  • Turn on low heat and whiskey together till the sugar is fully dissolved.
  • Remove from heat and let the cream of coconut cool. If adding salt and coconut extract, add once the cream of coconut has cooled and mix them in.
  • Refrigerate cream of coconut or freeze to store for an extended period of time.
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Related Post

Simple Syrup – Easy Recipe

Simple Syrup
Simple Syrup

What Is Simple Syrup And Why Should You Use It.

Simple Syrup is sugar dissolved in water. That’s it. It’s no more complicated than that. The only thing to remember when making simple syrup is there are two kinds of simple syrup. Standard 1:1 syrup and rich 2:1 syrup. 1:1 is just that, 1 part sugar to equal part water, and rich is two parts sugar to 1 part water. The clear winner between the two is rich simple syrup, it’s sweeter, last refrigerated longer, and most of the old recipes used rich syrup. Standard 1:1 is kind of the lazy man’s simple syrup, IMO. Advantages to standard simple syrup are it’s easier to make and pours a bit better. Although both taste good, simple syrup is a great way to add sweetness to a drink without changing its flavor.

The reason for using simple syrup, instead of just adding granulated sugar or sugar cubes, is it helps sugar incorporate into other liquids easier and much faster. Don’t use powdered or confectioners sugar as those are mixed with corn starch to prevent clumping. Some use sugar cubes in their drinks, and while they look fantastic and many old books call for using them, they don’t dissolve well and end up making a sugary crystal sludge on the bottom of the drink. Simple syrup solves many of the issues of regular white sugar by mixing easily with alcohol. It is easily measured in a jigger, is a consistent ingredient, and helps you work faster with less effort. There are no downsides to using simple syrup, but many use sugar cubes or granulated sugar.

Do You Need To Use Hot Water To Make Simple Syrup?

It depends on whether you are making rich or standard simple syrup. Rich simple syrup requires hot water to make it, and standard simple syrup does not. It all comes down to the concentration of sugar. Hot water can be saturated more than colder water. At room temperature, 1000 mLs of water becomes completely saturated with around 2000 grams of sugar, which is 2:1 and even though it is technically possible with water in a perfect environment. Even with filtered water, the sugar fights back and competes with other dissolved minerals in a typical environment. To reasonably combine sugar and water in a real-world setting, the water has to be able to hold 2x the sugar you are asking it to keep at a particular temperature. Near boiling temperatures, 1000 mLs of water can contain around 4000 grams of sugar. Thus it’s reasonable to dissolve equal parts sugar and water at room temperature and 2:1 sugar and water at near-boiling temperatures. Check out this handy chart for the solubility of sugar in water at various temperatures.

Should I Buy Simple Syrup Or Make It?

Always make your own simple syrup. Never buy this. It is just two ingredients: water and sugar. On top of that, most store-bought simple syrups are the cheaper standard simple syrup. Not even the better rich simple syrup. Most folks already have sugar at home, which saves a trip to the store, but if you need to go to the store, buy a bag of sugar instead of a bottle of syrup and make it at home. Simple syrup can only really be used as simple syrup, but sugar can be used to bake or cook. There are countless things you can make with a bag of granulated sugar.

What Is The Shelf Life Of Simple Syrup?

Again that depends on the kind of simple syrup and whether it is standard or rich. Always refrigerate simple syrup but even refrigerated, it goes bad pretty fast, so make it the same day you plan to use it instead of ahead of time. Standard simple syrup will last about one week in the fridge, and rich simple syrup will last 3 to 4 weeks in the refrigerator. Toss it out once you start to see any cloudiness, regardless of how old it is. That’s mold growing, and the syrup has gone bad. Take it from some who had multiple food poisoning and even salmonella once. Don’t mess with turned food.

Simple Syrup Substitutes.

While simple syrup is the gold standard in adding a clean natural sweetness to drinks, there can be reasons you want to use something else. Whether to impart additional flavors or for dietary reasons, here is a list of simple syrup substitutes.

  • Honey Syrup: Honey is about 1/2 sweeter than regular sugar. Try mixing this 2:1 (200 grams of honey to 100 grams of water) to get a syrup similar to a rich simple syrup. Try this recipe here for simple honey syrup.
  • Maple Syrup: Maple syrup is around 3x as sweet as regular sugar. Try mixing this 3/4:1 (75 grams maple syrup to 100 grams water) to water to get a syrup similar to rich simple syrup.
  • Stevia: Stevia is around 100x sweeter than regular sugar. Try mixing this 1 teaspoon (5 g) powdered stevia or 2 teaspoons (10 mLs) liquid stevia to 2 cups (500 mLs) of water to get a syrup similar to rich simple syrup.
  • Monk Fruit sweetener: Pure monk fruit is around 200x sweeter than regular sugar. Try mixing this 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 g) Monk fruit sweetener to 2 cups (500 mLs) of water to get a syrup similar to a rich simple syrup.
  • Agave syrup: Agave is around 1.5x sweeter than regular sugar. Try mixing this 1:1 agave syrup to water to get a syrup similar to a rich simple syrup.
  • Coconut sugar: Coconut sugar is the exact same sweetness as regular sugar. Try mixing this 2:1 coconut sugar to water to get a syrup similar to a rich simple syrup.
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Simple Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

8

servings
Calories

120

kcal
Total time

1

minute

A quick and easy simple syrup recipe.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz White Sugar

  • 11 oz Water

  • Optional Ingredient
  • 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar (Tartaric Acid)

Directions

  • Combine sugar and water in a saucepan and under gentle heat stir till the sugar is fully dissolved.
  • While still warm add the cream of tartar and stir to combine.
  • Bottle and refrigerate or freeze to store for an extended period of time.
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Honey Syrup – Delicious & Easy Recipe

Honey
Honey

What Is The Difference Between Honey Syrup vs. Regular Honey?

Honey is SUPER sweet and a bit richer than simple syrup, so you want to dilute it. Trying to get honey to dissolve in a drink is like getting regular sugar crystals to dissolve. It takes a while and is somewhat difficult. So to make cocktails, you’ll want to make honey syrup. Just mix honey and water at a 2 to 1 ratio. 2 oz honey to 1 oz water. This dilutes the honey enough so that it will blend easily but still be sweet.

There are tons of different kinds of honey, all with subtle variations based on the flowers used, environment, and bee. However, it doesn’t matter once it’s mixed into drinks with citrus, liqueurs, and spirits. So pick get any kind and go with it.

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Honey Syrup

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

10

servings
Calories

150

kcal
Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a simple Honey syrup.

Ingredients

  • 200 grams Honey

  • 100 grams Water

Directions

  • Simply combine the honey with warm water and stir till the honey is completely dissolved.
  • Bottle and use like regular syrup.
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Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.

Cocktails That Use Honey Syrup