Mayan Mule – Recipe

Mayan Mule Cocktail

Mayan Mule

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Mayan Mule.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Mezcal

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients except the Ginger Beer in the serving glass.
  • Mix the ingredients to chill.
  • Add the Ginger Beer.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The tequila variation of the Moscow Mule substituting tequila/mezcal for vodka. While the original has a more clean and refreshing ginger beer and lime taste, the tequila adds an excellent cactus taste to this one. If you use a smoky mezcal, you get an even stronger cactus to taste with some smoke flavor. Put a little Tajin or chilies spices on top, and you’re good to go.

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Cuba Libre – Classic Recipe & History

Cuba Libre

Cuba Libre

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

182

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Cuba Libre.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1.5 oz Gold Rum

  • 4-5 oz Coca-Cola

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Cuba Libre.

The Cuban Libre’s common origin story was invented in late 1800 during the Spanish-American War of 1898. John Pemberton sold his rights to Coca-Cola in 1896, and within a few years, Coke was one of the most popular Sodas in the United States. Who knows, but two years is very little time for a soft drink to travel internationally. What we know is the first published work to mention the Cuba Libre cocktail that I could find comes from the 1928 book “When It’s Cocktail Time in Cuba” by Basil Woon. He doesn’t provide a recipe, but he mentions it by name. The first cocktail book to publish a Cuba Libre recipe is the 1935 Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.

What is interesting is the Cuba libre is not mentioned in a single Cuban cocktail book or cookbook till 1939. A 1931 Cookbook called “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt does not mention it. She provides a very insightful history of drinking culture in Cuba with many drink recipes and the most likely true origin of the Daiquiri. Both the early Bar La Florida and Sloppy Joe’s Books do not mention the Cuba Libre. Not till the 1939 Sloppy Joe’s book that any Cuban publication even says it. Bar La Florida never published a Cuba Libre recipe. So the timeline of it is a little weird. It existed in the late 1920s and was known by many American bartenders by the mid-1930s; it was not written down in its country of origin until the late 1930s. Not quite sure what to make of that, and I don’t want to infer too much blindly. Who knows, It could mean nothing.

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Tom Collins – Classic Recipe & History

Tom Collins Cocktail

Tom Collins

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

363

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Tom Collins.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Old Tom Gin

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a shaker with ice.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Pour into the serving glass filled with ice. Lastly add the soda water.

Notes

Featured Video

What Is The Difference Between The John Collins And Tom Collins?

While probably not invented by Harry Johnson, his 1882 Bartenders Manual is the oldest printed book I could find to mention the Collins cocktail. Many sources say it was created in 1814 at Limmer’s Old House in London, but who knows. There is no documentation of this, and all the sources that state this seem to reference each other circularly. The oldest concrete evidence of this cocktail is the Harry Johnson one. It seems both the John Collins and Tom Collins are invented around the same time, and the Bartenders Manual gives a pretty definitive recipe for both the John and Tom Collins. His John Collins recipe calls for genever (dry gin doesn’t start to get mixed into cocktails till the end of the 1800s/early 1900s), and his recipe for the Tom Collins calls for Old Tom gin. Harry Johnson’s collins recipes and names are clearly defined, but unlike Harry Johnson, Jerry Thomas’s 1887 Bartenders Guide does not follow his recipes. The Bartender’s Guide doesn’t even mention the John Collins but instead uses the name Tom Collins for every variation of the collins. It has three different recipes for the Tom Collins. A Tom Collins whiskey, a Tom Collins brandy, and a Tom Collins genever. It doesn’t mention the Tom Collins with Old Tom gin and calls the one made with genever a Tom Collins.

To further complicate this, in 1885, a British cocktail book called “The New guide for the hotel, bar, restaurant, butler, and chef” by Bacchus and Cordon Bleu has a recipe for what they call a Fred Collins. Their Fred Collins Recipe is a Whiskey Collins with orange liqueur instead of simple syrup. Their Collins section states, “I should be glad if our caterers would agree what it is to be perpetually named. One Barkeeper calls it a John Collins – another Tom Collins. Harry and Fred are all members of the same family.” They then say they prefer the Fred Collins name, thus credence to Jerry Thomas’s version of the Collins in that the name is more a style than a specific drink. Hell, there was a Harry Collins we have never seen. The Savoy Cocktail Book does the same thing and has both a Dry Gin and Whiskey Tom Collins. Although The Savoy does say that a Tom Collins made with genever is instead called a John Collins.

While The Harry Johnson uses the names as specific cocktails, the Bartenders guide and others seemed to use the collins as a cocktail structure more than a specific recipe. Similar to the Rickey, Daisy, or Fizz, the collins is used to describe a structure of 2 parts base spirit, 1 part citrus, 1 part sweetener, and 4 or 5 parts carbonated beverage. Harry Johnson influence has been permanent and the collins is ultimately both. It is both a specific cocktail like Harry Johnson pushed and a cocktail archetype like others believed. looking at its influence as an archetype there are many popular cocktails which are structurally a collins that you would not think of as a Collins. The Adios Motherfucker, Mojito, French 75, Paloma, etc, are all just fun variation on the Collins form.

The Brief But Memorable History Of The Tom Collins.

The Tom Collins is enjoying a bit of a renaissance since Old Tom Gin is starting to become more regularly found in liquor stores again. Even though it was only around for a few decades and some major cocktail books back in the day left it out. Harry Craddock, Jerry Thomas (posthumously), George Kappeler, and a few others write about it, but major works like the Old Waldorf Astoria and Savoy make no mention of any Tom or John Collins. The oldest literary reference I could find to it was the 1882 Bartenders Manual which is the earliest reference to either the Tom or John Collins. I’ve read many articles saying the John Collins came first and the Tom was a variation, but I can’t find one without the other. Wikipedia says the oldest reference to a collins cocktail is in the 1869 Steward and Barkeeper’s Manual by Jesse Haney & company. Still, I looked over that whole book and never found the recipe they reference. Granted, I don’t have all the vintage cocktail books ever written, but I probably have a couple hundred more than any reasonable person, and the furthest back I can find the collins is by Harry Johnson.

Sadly this Old Tom cocktail was only on people’s radars for maybe 30 years. Haymans stopped manufacturing Old Tom in the 1930s, I think, and by the 1910s, most works refer to any collins cocktail as a Tom Collins and say you can use any base spirit with the drink. This harkens back to the Jerry Thomas book that called a collins made with whiskey a Tom Collins whiskey, or one made with brandy, a Tom Collins Brandy. This shows that the Tom/John Collins lived on as a cocktail structure more than a specific recipe. The name Tom Collins was being used even though no one was saying it needed to be mixed with Old Tom Gin.

Since Haymans started manufacturing Old Tom again in 2007, the classic spirit is becoming very popular now. The Tom Collins has become all the rage (It is a delicious drink, so it’s understandable), but back in the day, outside of Harry Johnson and a couple of others, It was kind of just a name to refer to a type of cocktail. In the late 1800s, a guy would maybe walk into a bar and ask for a Tom Collins, and the bartender would ask what spirit he wanted, and the guy could say whiskey, and the bartender would know what he meant. Obviously, I was not of drinking age or even alive during the late 19th century to verify this last statement. It is simply my interpolation based on how publications and literature used the name and the recipes they provided at different points in time.

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Dark ‘N Stormy – Recipe & History

Dark N' Stormy

Dark ‘N Stormy

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Caribbean
Servings

1

servings
Calories

197

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Dark N’ Stormy.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Gosling Black Seal Rum (Black Rum)

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

History Of The Dark ‘N Stormy

The history of the Dark ‘N Stormy begins on June 9, 1980, when the United States patent office awarded Gosling Brothers Limited, trademark SN 73-705,138, to the name Dark ‘N Stormy. This trademark secured the name Dark ‘N Stormy to Gosling in the case of any pre-mixed alcoholic cocktails using gum and ginger beer. This was not the first time ginger beer and rum were mixed together into a drink. Anthropological studies of islands in the Caribbean found this was a common drink, and recipes can’t be trademarked or patented. (Technically, a recipe could be patented, but it’s so incredibly rare it almost never happens. The USPTO won’t even grant Coca-Cola a patent to the Coke recipe.) What Gosling did was trademark just the name Dark ‘N Stormy and, thus, how it is used.

Soon after, Bermuda changed its official drink from the Rum Swizzle to the trademarked Dark ‘N Stormy. Probably because Gosling is the island’s largest exporter and a large chunk of the island’s economy, but it could be for other reasons. The cocktail proved wildly popular in the island’s boating community, and by word of mouth and marketing, the name stuck. If you walk into a bar today and order a Cuba Libre, the bartender may know what you are talking about and correct you with, “Oh, a rum and coke.” On the other hand, if you walk into a bar today and order a rum and ginger beer, the bartender will correct you with “Oh, a Dark ‘N Stormy.”

Again, I believe the trademark for Dark ‘N Stormy only applies to alcohol and mixers a company sells. For example, Bacardi can’t advertise their rum for making a Dark ‘N Stormy, but I don’t want to take the chance and get in anyone’s crosshairs. So a Dark ‘N Stormy should only be made with Gosling Black Seal Rum, but a rum and ginger beer can be made with any dark rum.

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Moscow Mule – Original Recipe & History

Moscow Mule Cocktail

Moscow Mule

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

215

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Moscow Mule.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Vodka

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

Invented in 1941 at the Cock’n Bull pub in Los Angeles, this drink single-handedly saved vodka sales. The story goes that three down and out-of-luck individuals, Sophie Berezinski, John Martin, and Jack Morgan, came together and created this drink.

Sophie Berezinski owned a bunch of copper mugs no one wanted, John Martin was a distributor for Schmirnoff, a flavorless spirit no one wished to, and Jack Morgan was the Cock’n Bull bar owner with a ginger beer no one wanted. They combined their unwanted products, and the rest is history.

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Cape Codder – Classic Vodka Cranberry Recipe

Cape Cod Cocktail

Cape Cod

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

215

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Cape Cod cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Vodka

  • 5 oz Cranberry Juice

Directions

  • Add ice to serving glass.
  • Pour Ingredients over the ice and into serving Glass.
  • Give the drink a few turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

The History Of The Cape Codder (Vodka Cranberry)

The earliest record of the Cape Cod (Cape Codder) comes from 1945 in volume 6 of the Cranberry Canners Inc. Newsletter. The article describes a New York restaurant whose owner is also a cranberry grower and the unique ways he incorporates cranberries into his menu.

“In the continental atmosphere of Pierre’s on 52 East 53rd Street, New York, the ultra-American cranberry juice is always on the menu… The restaurateur, Pierre Ferro, is also a cranberry grower and a member of the NCA… With cranberry juice, he adds vodka, a dash of fresh lime and he comes up with a Red Devil cocktail”

The Red Devil name doesn’t stick, and the cocktail only seems to catch on in the late 1950s. I can’t find any cocktail books from the 1940s through 1960s, even ones from New York, that mention it. Any mention of it in the 1950s comes from magazine articles, and it often has different names. A Samovar Vodka ad in Life Magazine calls it a Jubilee Punch. A musical from 1958 called “Say, Darling” calls it vodka and cranberry, and an article in Time Magainze from 1961 mentions how Trader Vic’s calls it a Rangoon Ruby. The June 1961 issue of the Philadelphia Inquirer called it a Jersey Wedding. The list goes on and on. The name Cape Codder, shortened to Cape Cod, started to appear in the 1960s when Ocean Spray began promoting the drink and pushing the juice market hard.

Before Thanksgiving 1959, the Department of Health announced that a few samples of Ocean Spray Cranberries from growers in Washington and Oregon had residual cancer-causing weed killer aminotriazole still on them. All Ocean Spray Cranberries products were pulled from the shelves, and the loss of an entire year’s harvest almost destroyed the company. Realizing the need to expand beyond the holidays Ocean Spray looked for any way to sell its product in new markets. They began heavily promoting Cranberry juice as a healthy alternative to soda for children and adults, dried candies cranberries as a snack, and cranberry juice as an alcoholic mixer for adults. The company took the already-known vodka and cranberry cocktail and began advertising it as a Cape Codder, further tying the name to the Ocean Spray brand. The advertising worked, and by the end of the 1960s, the cocktail was generally called a Cape Codder. Even Trader Vic had renamed his Rangoon Ruby the Cape Codder for the 1972 edition of his Bartenders Guide. The multiple names for this drink persist today, as most refer to this cocktail as simply a Vodka Cran

The Rise Of Vodka Cocktails in the 1940s.

Vodka cocktails were almost nonexistent and not popular till the 1940s. Except for the Bloody Mary, I can’t think of a single cocktail that contained vodka before the 1940s. What happened in the 1940s to change that? The Moscow Mule was invented in 1941, and its overnight success suddenly made vodka a popular spirit. Most classic vodka cocktails can be traced back to this period. Since Vodka had no history of being used as an ingredient, bartenders found it easy to replace gin with vodka and give the drink a fun new name. The screwdriver was just an orange blossom with vodka. The vodka Martini was just a martini with vodka, and a drink called the Russian Bear (most likely the origin of the White Russian) was just an Alexander with vodka instead of gin, and the list goes on.

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Americano – Classic Recipe & History

Americano Cocktail

Americano

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

162

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic 1860s Americano. 

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Campari

  • 1.5 oz Sweet Vermouth

  • 4 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in your serving glass with ice.
  • Stir and combine those ingredients and chill the glass.
  • Gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation.
  • Garnish with an orange slice.

Recipe Video

Featured Video

The History Of The Americano.

The Americano cocktail was invented around the mid-1860s in Milan, Italy, by Gaspare Campari. Gaspare ran around Italy trying to sell his bitter aperitif until he met his wife and settled down in Milan. Settling down in Milan, he opened up Gaspare’s Bar, where he sold his aperitif, which he also named after himself, and began mixing up the house cocktail called the Milano-Torino. Milano because that is where he produced Campari and Torino because that is the town that produced Italian sweet vermouth. As time went on, the drink became a huge hit and the drink of choice for many traveling Americans. By the early 1900s, the Milano-Torino became better known as an Americano. It is considered the predecessor to the Negroni since the Negroni was invented as a strong Americano. The difference between the Americano and its more famous younger brother, the Negroni, is the Negroni Swaps the 120ml (4 oz) of soda water for 30 mls (1 oz) of gin. This changes the cocktail from a refreshing and light highball to a boozy and more bitter lowball cocktail.

What Are Some Variations Of The Americano?

Variations of the Americano include The Negroni, The Boulevardier, The Man About Town, and the Patricia. These cocktails have a similar flavor profile to the americano but are very different in style. They are all short, strong drinks, while the Americano is tall, light, and refreshing. There is nothing quite like the americano, but these four are the most similar.

What Does the Americano Taste Like?

The Americano taste is refreshing since the soda water helps cut the bitter and herbal Aperitifs. The flavor is still very medicinal and not for everyone. If you like medicinal or herbal tastes, you may like this, but if you are someone who sticks to rum and cokes, adioses, or mules, then this may not be for you. If you are curious about trying Campari, this would be the drink to start with.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The essential ingredient in this is the sweet vermouth. There is only one Campari, and soda water is all the same, but the sweet vermouth you use will make a big difference. There are no terrible sweet vermouths, and the cheaper stuff works fine, but there are a few amazing ones. I usually buy smaller 375ml bottles of sweet vermouth because it is wine-based, and like all wines, it doesn’t go well after a while. It has a slightly longer shelf life than regular red wine but not much more. When I buy the larger 750ml bottles, I find half of it spoiled before I finish using them. So instead of spending $7 for a large normal bottle of sweet vermouth that you will end up wasting half off, pay $13 for a fantastic bottle of sweet vermouth that’s half the size, but you will finish. Once you start using excellent sweet vermouth, you will never want to use anything else. It makes a very noticeable difference for not that much more money.

Variations Of This Cocktail.

Popular variations of this kind of cocktail are:

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7 & 7 Cocktail- Recipe

7 and 7 Cocktail

7 & 7

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

210

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic 7 & 7 cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Canadian Whisky

  • 6 oz Seven Up

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Featured Video

So this one is specifically named for the use of Seagrams 7 and 7 Up, but any blended Canadian whiskey will work well here. The 7 & 7 was a popular highball back in the 70s. It’s pretty simple but is a lovely light and refreshing cocktail. I give it a thumbs up.

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Mojito – Classic Recipe & History

Mojito Criollo Cocktail

Mojito

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

243

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Mojito Criollo Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 5 Mint Leaves

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz White Rum

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine mint leaves and simple syrup in the serving glass and muddle together.
  • Add spirit and ice to the serving glass and stir for 20 – 30 seconds.
  • Pour soda water into glass and give the drink a couple last turns to mix.

Recipe Video

Notes

Some say the mojito goes back to the mid-1500s, but I doubt that, especially as rum was just being invented about then. No one knows who invented this drink or when. All that is known is that it was created in Cuba. It is structurally a rum collins with mint, and the collins style of cocktails started to become common in the United States around the 1880s. Also, many American-style cocktails quickly made their way to the Caribbean because of trade and tourism, so it’s reasonable to assume this could have been invented as early as the 1880s. The recipe I have here is the Mojito from the 1935 Bar la Florida book. Bar la Florida was one of the most popular and influential bars in Cuba pre-Castro. It is credited with creating countless, now considered canon, Caribbean cocktails and having one of the most significant impacts on Caribbean-style cocktails. Bar La Florida referred to their Mojito as the Mojito Criollo. Like the Daiquiri from that book, this mojito uses lemons instead of lime but, also like the Daiquiri, every other recipe for the mojito I know of uses lime. I was born in the US, but my family is Cuban and every Cuban I know uses limes. Maybe this bar just had a thing with lemons. Who knows. So for the sake of consensus, I’m going to go with lime juice. Also, there is a Mojito Criollo #2 recipe in the book that uses lemon. So this adds a little variety.

My dad grows mint and limes in his backyard to make sure he is always ready to make a mojito at a moment’s notice. This is the go-to party cocktail for most Cubans I know.

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Japanese Highball – Classic Recipe

Japanese Highball

Japanese Highball

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

4

servings
Calories

150

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Japanese Highball.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Scotch

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Fill your serving glass with ice and combine all ingredients except for the soda water in the glass.
  • Stir and combine the ingredients and at the same time chilling the glass.
  • Top off with more ice if you need to.
  • Lastly gently add the soda water to maintain its carbonation and give a couple gentle stirs to mix.

Notes

Featured Video

How The Japanese Highball Is A Structurally Correct Highball.

While many long drinks in tall glasses tend to be called highballs and are often thought of that way, a structurally correct highball is simply 1 part spirit, 2-2.5 parts carbonated beverage, and optional bitters or citrus peel. They do not contain juice or additional sweetener. I love this cocktail, and it’s usually what I often make for myself when I’m home. It goes down easy and gives me the pleasure of drinking a beer without the bloat. While the Japanese did not create the highball, they have maintained the classic highball better than American or British cultures. The highball has continued to stay a popular beverage there.

Keep This In Mind When Drinking A Japanese Highball.

Again even though it’s called a Japanese highball, it was not invented by the Japanese. It’s called that because it’s still a trendy cocktail with Japanese business people after work. Similar to how the Japanese jigger was originally American, it eventually fell out of fashion in the USA and remained popular in Japan. Sadly most Americans find this cocktail dull at first taste and need to be told its history or how it’s popular in Japan to say, “oh, ok. I see”. American and British cocktail culture is one more strong drink with juice-filled big flavors, and those are good, but this cocktail is all about subtlety done perfectly. This cocktail is all about the perfect technique.

The Most Important Part To Making A Japanese Highball.

Most cocktails live in a gradient from good to bad and fall somewhere between. How well-made or poorly made a cocktail will end up is based on ingredients and preparation. The most crucial part of creating a Japanese highball and the mizuwari is your technique. How well you prepare each ingredient before moving on to the next step will make or break this cocktail. No joke, this can only be 1 of 2 things, perfect or awful. Learning how to prepare this cocktail taught me more about mixing drinks than any other cocktail.

1). Start with a chilled glass. Stemware matters too. Use a highball, collins, or zombie glass (they are all pretty similar anyway). The drink needs a heavy broad base to hold extra coldness, and the straight sides make stirring easier. Pint glasses are delicate, but they taper to a smaller base which means less cold surface area to whiskey ratio. Next, add your ice, and since the glass is already chilled, there is no need to use the ice to chill it. If the glass is not chilled, stir the ice to cool the glass and dump the water that has melted off. Also, the ice is vital. This is the ice served with the drink, so it should be challenging, clear, and freezing ice. This is done to dilute the whiskey as little as possible before adding the soda water. It should be refreshing bubbly soda water lengthening the whiskey, and not warmed melted ice.

2). Next, add your whiskey and stir for maybe 10 seconds. This is to cool the whiskey down to near freezing so that once you add the soda water, the warmth of the whiskey does not force carbonation to leave the drink. You don’t want to over stir and add risk adding too much water to the whiskey, thus diluting it too much and making for a flat cocktail. Ice is typically around 0°F (-18°C), and whiskey freezes at -17°F (-27°C). So if you keep stirring, it will keep getting colder and colder until it becomes the same temperature as the ice, 0°F, but it doesn’t need to get that cold. The drink is getting far colder than it needs to be and gaining extra flat melted ice. It just needs to match the temperature of the soda water. Soda water will be refrigerated, making it around 34°F (1°C). Then again, you don’t know when you have hit 34°F, so just stir for 10 seconds. That will get you in the right ballpark.

3). Next, add the soda water. The ratio is 1 part whiskey to 2 – 2.5 parts soda. You’ll want to vary this based on how strongly flavored the whiskey is. You aim to balance and open up the flavors, so a more intensely flavored whiskey may want 5oz soda water to 2oz whiskey, and a more subtle whiskey would work better with 4oz soda water to 2oz whiskey. Know the whiskey and add what you think will make it taste better. Also, how you pour is essential too. Don’t be violent and pour it in. Pour gently and down the side of the glass to maintain as much carbonation as possible. The warmer and more aggressive the pour, the more bubbles will leave.

4). Finally, give it just two last stirs. Although don’t just turn the spoon in a circle; bring it to the bottom and pull the whiskey up into the soda water. Do this just two times to evenly mix the drink while losing as little carbonation as possible. A lot of work for a simple two-ingredient drink, right?

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