Sake Bomb – Iconic Sushi Cocktail

The Sake Bomb Chant

Ichi, ni, san! Then boom you pound your fists on the table causing the shot glass to slip between the chop sticks and fall into the drink. Alcohol splashes everywhere, you then chug it, and everyone has a good time. Ichi, ni, san is Japanese for 1, 2, 3. Many popular theories has this cocktail invented during the American occupation of Japan after WWII but I don’t buy that. That story just seems too neat and convenient to me. I’m just guessing (so I’m most likely wrong) but I get the feeling this was a gimmick drink at a sushi restaurant in the late 1970s/early 80s. Some bullshit story about it being invented during WWII was told to make it sound cool and bars pushing this drink sold more high markup alcohol. I can’t prove that or have any evidence to back that up but that seems more plausible to me give the type of drink this is.

What Does a Sake Bomb Taste Like

The sake bomb is actually pretty good. I’m personally not the biggest fan of sake, but I find it mixes well with beer. Usually the drink is chugged so you never really get a chance to actually taste the drink but the fruit and grain flavors of the sake are subtle enough to enhance the beer’s existing flavor without changing it too much. I rarely buy sake, but when I do, I mix it with beer.

Best Beer To For A Sake Bomb

Typically a Japanese beer is used like Sapporo, Asahi, or Kirin. Those three beers are all lagers so lager style beer is what you want to try and stick with. In fact almost all beer in Japan is a lager, only a few like Hitachino Nest are ale style beers. So try and stick with one of those 3 if you can. Asahi super dry is my favorite of the 3 but at the end of the day, the best beer to use is the one you like.

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Sake Bomb – Iconic Sushi Cocktail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

293

kcal
ABV

17%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Sake Bomb.

Ingredients

  • 6 oz Lager Beer

  • 1.5 oz Sake

Directions

  • Pour half a 12 oz bottle of beer into a pint glass
  • Separately pour a shot of sake into a shot glass.
  • Place 2 chopsticks on top of the pint glass the width of the shot glass.
  • Place the shot glass on top so it is supported by the chopsticks

Notes

Mizuwari – Water Cut With Whiskey

What The Name Mizuwari Means

The mizuwari is an iconic Japanese cocktail and it mean cut with water. Cutting whiskey with water is nothing unique to this cocktail as even in traditional Irish whiskey drinking the whiskey is cut with a little water to open up the flavors. The difference here is how much the whiskey is cut with water. Many whiskey drinkers will use just the water that melts off the ice, or some will add a single ounce of water, but the mizuwari is massive a 1-2 or 1-2.5 ratio of whiskey to water.

Why Drink a Mizuwari

The mizuwari and Japanese highball have a similar soul to them. They have a clean clear whiskey flavor but are not overpowering like a short old fashion style whiskey cocktail is. They are refreshing like a collins or rickey but without any of the extra flavors the collins or rickey bring. They are clean, easy to drink cocktails with whiskey being the only unobstructed flavor. The mizuwari is a bit easier to drink than the highball as it does not even have carbonation. but do not be mistaken. This is not just water added to whiskey. If done right this can be a great cocktail. If done wrong this can be the flattest and saddest drink.

The Most Important Part

The mizuwari is all about technique. Its just two ingredients (3 including the ice) but if combined properly those two ingredients can become something very good. So the most important part of making a mizuwari is the whole making of it. Its similar to making a Japanese highball but just a little bit simpler.

1). Start with a chilled glass. Stemware matters too. A highball, collins, or zombie glass works (they are all pretty similar anyway). Thats because the drink needs the heavy wide base to hold extra coldness, and the straight sides make stirring easier. pint glasses are fine but they taper to a smaller base which means less cold surface area to whiskey ratio. Next add your ice and since the glass is already chilled there is no need to use the ice to chill it. If the glass is not chilled stir the ice to cool the glass and dump the water that has melted off. Also the ice is very important. This is the ice served with the drink so it should be hard, clear, and very cold ice. All of this is done to dilute the whiskey as little as possible before adding the water. Obviously if you are adding water you are diluting it but the reason it preferable to dilute it as little as possible before adding water is it helps maintain the whiskey to water ratio you serve it at longer. If you combine the whiskey and water at a 1-2.5 ratio and then add ice then the ice will melt and change the ratio to something like 1-3 or more. If you do it the preferable way then you are able to see how much water was added chilling the whiskey and add more or less water as needed and not have melting ice change that ratio.

2). Next add your whiskey and stir for maybe 10 seconds. This is to cool the whiskey down to near freezing so that once you add the water the ratio is not changed while the ice melts and cools the drink to near freezing. When preparing a Japanese highball your concern is preserving the carbonation with cooler temperatures which you do not need to worry about here. This part is just to protect the water to whiskey ratio.

3). Next add the refrigerated water. The typical ratio is 1 part whiskey to 2 – 2.5 parts chilled water. You’ll want to vary this based on how strongly flavored the whiskey is and how much it was already lengthened by the melting ice. Your aim is balance and opening up the flavors so a more strongly flavored whiskey may want 5oz water to 2oz whiskey and a more subtle whiskey would work better with 4oz soda water to 2oz whiskey. Know the whiskey and add what you think will make it taste better. Also use a good tasting filtered water. You’re not adding juice or syrups so there is nothing to mask bad water or bad ice.

4). Finally give it a few last stirs to mix. Although don’t just turn the spoon in a circle but bring it to the bottom and pull the whiskey up into the water. Do this just couple times to evenly mix the drink. A lot of work for a simple 2 ingredient drink right?

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Mizuwari – Water Cut With Whiskey

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Course: DrinksCuisine: Japanese
Servings

1

servings
Calories

150

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a mizuwari

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Scotch

  • 5 oz Water

Directions

  • Add ice and whiskey to a chilled glass and stir the two to chill the whiskey
  • Add chilled filtered water and stir just a couple more times to mix the two ingredients.

Notes

Genever And Tonic – Modern Version Of A Classic Cocktail

A Variation On The Classic Gin And Tonic

This variation of the classic Gin and Tonic uses two older style ingredients to create a vision of what an 1800s gin and tonic would have been like if it existed then. The older style genever gin adds a bit of aged flavor along with the traditional juniper and herbal notes. The tonic syrup brings an earthy and citrusy, almost tamarind like flavor not found in normal tonic water. If you like gin and tonics this one is definitely worth a try.

How Does The Genever and Tonic Taste

The genever and tonic hits all the notes of a classic gin and tonic, but it brings many new flavors too. The tonic syrup adds an earthiness and citrus flavor that pairs well with the more aged herbal flavors of the genever. This is a fantastic tasting cocktail that manages to both flavorful and refreshing with an almost tamarind like quality to it.

History Of The Use Of Tonic Syrup and Quinine

The clarified tonic water used today dates back to the 1870s when Schweppes figured out how to precisely extract quinine, clarify it and bottle it as the product we know today. Discover by the native peoples of Peru, the bark of the Cinchona tree had many medicinal properties one of which was preventing illness from mosquito bites and other physical ailments. The invading Spanish navy observed this and brought back Cinchona to be studied. The Cinchona bark was found to help with nerve pains, fevers, asthma, and they realized the illness it prevented from the mosquito bites was malaria. The ground up and infused cinchona bark tasted terrible, and to counter the poor taste spices, citrus peels and sugar were added to make a kind of quinine julap. Often the syrup would be administered with wine and eventually led to a market of quinine wines called quinquina. Dubonnet, Lillet, and Cocchi Americano are aperitifs we still use to day that started out as quinquinas with Dubonnet and Cocchi Americano still containing quinine to this day.

It was know for a very long time that quinine helped treat and prevent malaria but the process of extraction was too crude and not some thing that could be done on a scale massive enough to support large European armies. The 1820s saw a massive improvement in the extraction process and in the 1850s Erasmus Bond began selling the first carbonated quinine water. By this point the English had already successfully invaded India (present day India and Pakistan) but Africa’s environment was still too difficult to crack. In the 1870s Schweppes perfected the process and began selling a clarified “Indian Quinine Water” that could be produced on a massive scale. This was the invention many European militaries were waiting for.

At the start of 1880s the major European empires were able to penetrate Africa beyond its coast, dividing up is peoples and land for their personal profit and they could only have done it with quinine. The Gin and Tonic as we know it today was probably not being made around this time. If the tonic water was being mixed with gin it was most likely because of availability and not soldiers specifically looking to make this cocktail.

Creation Of The Gin And Tonic

The gin and tonic as we know it today was most likely invented in British occupied India around the 1920s to 1930s. If a genever and tonic was ever made it was most likely made between the 1870s and 1900. Dry gin didn’t start to become a common mixing spirit till the early 1900s just as genever and Old Tom gin started to fade. Cocktail books from the 1890s and back make no mention of it. In fact no cocktail books mention a Gin and Tonic cocktail till the 1940s. The earliest reference I can find to a gin and tonic are in the 1946 The Roving Bartender and The Stork Club Bar book. The Roving Bartender by Bill Kelly describes it as “A favorite drink in the tropics”. After that it’s common in cocktail books but every minor and major cocktail book prior to those two makes no mention of the drink. The simplest and most likely reason is it didn’t exist yet. Ideas and recipes take time to travel so placing its creation around the 1920s to 30s lines up.

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Genever And Tonic – Modern Version Of A Classic Cocktail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

293

kcal
ABV

9%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a vintage style gin and tonic

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Tonic Syrup

  • 2 oz Genever

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the soda water in a glass with ice
  • Stir the ingredients together to both chill and mix them
  • Top off with the soda water
  • Garnish with a lemon slice

Notes

Long Island Ice Tea – Classic 1972 Bob Butt Recipe

Created by Bob Butt in 1972, this drink was an entry into an orange liqueur mixing contest. The Long Island carries on the tradition of naming east coast cocktails after regions of New York and specifically gets its name from the fact that Mr. Butt was working at a bar in Long Island at the time.

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Long Island Ice Tea – Classic 1972 Bob Butt Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

540

kcal
ABV

29%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Long Island Ice Tea.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 oz Vodka

  • 1.5 oz White Rum

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

  • 1.5 oz Reposado Tequila

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz Coke

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Chilcano Cocktail – Classic Peruvian Pisco Cocktail

Think of this as a Peruvian Moscow Mule but the bitters add a really nice spice to it. Invented somewhere in the early 1900s in Peru it can be prepare with simple syrup and bitters or without. While the bitters do add a nice spice to the drink, if you choose to prepare it without syrup and bitters, I would add an additional oz (30mls) of ginger beer. The chilcano does predate the Moscow Mule but it is unknown if the chilcano had any influence on the creation of the moscow mule in Los Angeles.

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Chilcano Cocktail – Classic Peruvian Pisco Cocktail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: Peruvian
Servings

1

servings
Calories

221

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Classic Chicano.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 3 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 2 oz Pisco

  • 4 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

El Diablo – Original 1972 Trader Vic’s Recipe

A lot of the vintage tequila cocktails I have been able to scrap together are actually from the Trader Vic’s 1972 revised bartending guide. In fact he has this cocktail in there twice. It’s first referenced as the El Diablo, then the EXACT same recipe is on the next page as the Mexican El Diablo. They are line for line, word for word, ounce for ounce the same. The only difference is one has a straw and the other does not. Not sure if that really counts as a different cocktail but maybe he was trying to pad up his tequila section like me. He must have struggled to find tequila recipes too; There are not that many.

I’m not really one to talk though, all this writing is really hard. Collectively I think I have written about 100 pages worth of single spaced 12 point font information and history for this app, and I know I have a bunch of grammar and syntax errors. So if you find any of those errors… oops, I try to fix them as I find them. I also try to update my histories if I find out any new info.

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El Diablo – Original 1972 Trader Vic’s Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

4

servings
Calories

300

kcal
Total time

0

minutes

Learn how to make the an El Diablo.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 oz Creme de Cassis

  • 1.5 oz Reposado Tequila

  • 3 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Mojito Criollo No.2 – Classic 1935 Cuban Bar La Florida Recipe

A variation of the original Mojito from the 1935 Bar La Florida recipe book this recipe calls for gin instead of rum. In fact that is the only difference. The book also uses lemon juice in the original one too, which I swapped for lime juice instead. My description for the Mojito Criollo #1 provides my justification and reason for using lime instead of lemon. And since I used lime in the first one I will keep with lemon in this one for varieties sake. Both the #1 and #2 are excellent drinks and the use of gin makes this taste like a more refreshing highball version of a Southside.

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Mojito Criollo No.2 – Classic 1935 Cuban Bar La Florida Recipe

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Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

279

kcal
ABV

8%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Mojito No.2.

Ingredients

  • 5 Mint Leaves

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 5 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine mint leaves and simple syrup in the serving glass and muddle together.
  • Add spirit. Add ice to the serving glass and stir for 20 – 30 seconds.
  • Pour soda water into glass and give the drink a couple last turns to mix.

Notes

Pimm’s Cup Cocktail – James Pimms 1830s No.1 Recipe

The History Of James Pimm’s Tonic Drink

The Pimm’s No. 1 Cup was Invented in either the 1820s or 1830s by James Pimm in London and was actually 1 of 6 different house drinks. James Pimm’s No. 1 Cup was a gin cocktail, thus making Pimm’s cup a gin cocktail. No.2 was a scotch cocktail, No.3 was a brandy cocktail, No.4 was a rum cocktail, No.5 was a rye whiskey cocktail, and No.6 was a vodka cocktail. James Pimm only invented 1,2, and 3, with No. 4,5, and 6 being invented almost 100 years later. James Pimm would start his cocktails with a base spirit, added some quinine, herbs, and sweeten it with lemonade and was sold it as a tonic/health drink. Each cup had a different base spirit and a different health benefit.

James Pimm eventually started selling pre-made concentrated bottles of each of his drinks that the average person could buy at a store and make at home by just adding lemonade. Similar to how you can buy pre-made margarita mix and just need to add tequila. So when you buy bottle of Pimms No.1 Cup, you’re actually buying Pimm’s No.1 Cup concentrate. In the 1970s the Pimm’s company was bought and No.2 – No.6 were eventually phased out leaving only his gin based No.1 concentrate. Sometimes No.3 is sold in limited releases as Pimm’s Winter cup and No.6 as Pimm’s Vodka Cup. Every now and then old bottles of 2-6 will go to auction and get anywhere from 150 to 400 dollars a bottle. I can’t imagine that they still taste any good.

What do you mix with Pimms?

There are 4 different mixers to add to Pimms. The original mixer is sparkling lemonade. Sparkling lemonade is not Sprite or 7Up, it’s more like the fancy French or Italian sparkling lemonades you would find at a Trader Joes or whole foods. If you don’t have access to sparkling lemonade you can make your own by combining lemon juice, simple syrup, and soda water. Another mixer is just normal lemonade. This is my favorite way since its a bit more acidic and less sweet, and it makes the drink taste kinda like a herbal Tom Collins. Another mixer, and maybe most common, is with ginger beer. This is a very popular way to mix it today and it does add a nice spice to the drink. The last mixer is lemon lime soda; like Sprite or 7Up. This last one is a pretty boring mixer since it just adds sweetness and no real extra flavor. But if you want to go traditional then go with sparkling lemonade.

What Do THey Taste Like

The final taste of a Pimm’s cup will vary based on what it is mixed with. Pimm’s itself has actually a wonderful taste similar to that of a gin based Drambuie meets sweet vermouth. I think it would be interesting to experiment with it as a sweet vermouth substitute, but back to the Pimm’s cup. Sparkling lemonade adds a nice bit of sweetness and lemon flavor without being acidic. Normal lemonade adds a nice bit of lemon and acidic flavor to the drink while being the least sweet of the four. Ginger Beer replaces the acidic lemon flavor with a spicy peppery earthy flavor. Lemon Lime soda simply adds a soda like sweetness. lemon lime soda is not bad but the other 3 just taste so much better.

Garnishing a Pimm’s Cup

The Pimm’s Cup is unique from other cocktails because the garnishes are just as important to the drink as the drink itself. A Pimm’s without garnishes is not a proper Pimm’s. I once read that Pimm’s use to use bergakmot petals but since those are expensive and hard to find a common substitute are cucumber slices. Not sure if that is true or not but the standard garnishes that go into a Pimm’s Cup are cucumber slices, strawberry slices, and mint, and I will agree that they do make the drink taste better.

Making a whole pitcher of Pimm’s Cup

I have provided a recipe for each single drink. If you wanted to make a pitcher of this with a whole bottle of Pimm’s, then mix a whole bottle of Pimm’s with 1.9L (about 8 cups) of mixer. Remember to add the garnishes to the pitcher as well.

The most important Ingredient

The most important ingredient in the Pimm’s Cup is the mixer you use. As described above the mixer used will completely change the drink. So my advice is to ditch the soda and use either ginger beer, a nice lemonade, or drive to Trader Joes and buy Italian sparkling lemonade. Life is too short to waste on drinking subpar mixer.

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Pimm’s Cup Cocktail – Classic Mid 1800s Pimms No.1 Recipe

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

258

kcal
ABV

7%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Pimm’s No.1 Cup.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Pimm’s No.1 Concentrate

  • 5 oz Sparkling Lemonade

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass. Combine all the ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Garnish with strawberry and cucumber slices and mint.
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.

Notes

Irish Mule – A Smoky, Refreshing Variation of the Moscow Mule

This is the Irish Whiskey version of a Moscow Mule, sometimes called the Irish Mule. There is an older similar drink called the Horse’s Neck that is also whiskey and ginger beer. The difference between these two is the Irish Mule has lime juice in it while the Horses Neck has a large lemon peal to add citrus flavor.

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Irish Mule – A Smoky, Refreshing Variation of the Moscow mule

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

227

kcal
ABV

10%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Irish Mule.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Irish Whiskey

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Add ice to the serving glass and add the lime juice and irish whiskey
  • Give the drink a couple turns to chill and mix.
  • Gently add the Ginger Beer and give one last stir to mix.

Notes

Horses Neck Cocktail – A Refreshing Bourbon Ginger Cocktail

This was the Irish Mule before ordering an Irish Mule became a thing. Dating back to the 1890s this drink as originally a non alcoholic drink that folks started to fortify with brandy or whiskey because, why not? Only real difference between this and an Irish Mule is this drink has a large lemon peel for flavor where as an Irish Mule has a bit of lime juice for that citrus flavor.

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Horses Neck Cocktail – A Refreshing Bourbon Ginger Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

225

kcal
ABV

11%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Horses Neck.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Bourbon

  • 5 oz Ginger Beer

Directions

  • Cut a long peel from a lemon and place it in the glass filled with ice.
  • Simply combine both ingredients and ice into the serving glass.
  • Give the drink a few turns to mix and chill.

Notes