Ward Eight – Original Recipe & History

Ward Eight
Ward Eight

The History Of The Ward Eight (Ward 8) Cocktail.

The Ward Eight cocktail was invented by Charlie Carter while working at the Locke-Ober in Boston Massachusetts. To Celebrate his win in 1896 (most Ward Eight recipes online say 1898 but he was elected to that position in 1896) to the Eighth Ward district of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, Martin Lomasney, hosted a party at the Locke-Ober and asked the barman to make several unique drinks. The party would vote on the drinks and select the best one.

“A good many years back, Martin Lomasney delivered the eighth ward for a certain gentleman who, to show his gratitude, threw a party at his club. Charlie Carter was mixing drinks at the club at the time. The host asked Charlie to mix up several different kinds of drinks for his guest, so that they might select the one they liked best. … All were of one mind on the selection. … When it came to a name, they again left it to Charlie, so he promptly christened the newcome the “Ward Eight” and Ward Eight it has been ever since, a favorite drink in Boston and also in Waterbury when you have charlie mix one up for you.” – 1936 Waterbury Democrat

The oldest recipe for the Ward Eight I can find comes from the 1926 Book “The Cocktail Book A Sideboard Manual for Gentlemen” by L.C. Page. The recipe here is that recipe, and both the Old Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy Cocktail books seem to mirror this recipe. The only difference being the L.C. Page recipe adds soda water and the Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy do not.

What Does The Ward Eight Taste Like?

The Ward Eight from L.C. Page’s book is a fantastic cocktail, and it tastes like a pomegranate soda. It’s a nice balance of sweet and sour with the refreshing effervescent of soda water. The Old Waldorf-Astoria and Savoy recipes do not add soda water, and while their recipes are still good, they don’t quite hit the mark as the L.C. Page recipe does.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Ward Eight

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

200

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Ward Eight cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

  • 3 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
  • Top off with soda water. Stir to combine.

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Blue Moon – Recipe & History

Blue Moon
Blue Moon

The History Of The Blue Moon

There seem to be as many Blue Moon recipes as cocktail books. The recipes, for the most part, are similar, but they all seem to use a different liqueur to add sweetness and color. After reading a few recipes, understanding the history of Creme de Violette, Yvette, and Parfait d’Amour, and reading David Embury’s surprise to discover about blue Curaçao, I realized, It doesn’t matter what liqueur you use as long as the color is right.

Hugo Ensslin uses Creme Yvette, Harry Craddock uses Maraschino liqueur with blue food dye, David Embury uses Creme Yvette or Parfait d’Amour and says even Blue Curaçao is fine. The 1945 official Chicago bartenders recipe uses Creme de Violette. The list goes on and on, but the similarity they all share is gin, lemon or lime juice, and a blue/purple-colored liqueur.

The oldest Blue Moon recipe I can find is the Hugo Ensslin recipe from his 1917 Book “Recipe For Mixed Drinks.” Creme Yvette would give the drink a red color, so Yvette is an odd choice. The next one comes from Harry Craddock, who called the drink a Blue Devil and used Maraschino liqueur with blue food dye. The Blue Moon sometimes goes by the name the Blue Devil, and David Embury’s 1948 book “The Fine Art Of Mixing” refers to it by both names. He also seems indifferent to using any specific liqueur. In addition, below the recipes tells a story about how he heard of people using blue Curaçao, which he had never heard of before. After looking into it more, he learned blue Curaçao is nothing other than normal orange liqueur with blue food dye, and how that’s fine too. None of these bartenders seem concerned with the exact taste, just how it looks.

What Is The Difference Between Crème de Violette, Creme Yvette, And Parfait d’Amour?

Most older recipes will list these ingredients side-by-side as being interchangeable in a particular recipe. Not because the three taste the same but because they tend to share a similar purple/reddish color. A Blue Moon wouldn’t be a blue moon if it didn’t look blue. Even though they look similar, they all have different flavors.

  • Creme de Violette: Violet-flavored liqueur.
  • Creme Yvette: Honey, orange, vanilla, strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries.
  • Parfait d’Amour: Different tastes for every brand. Common flavors are typically orange, rose/violet, bitter almond, citrus, herbs, etc.

Any violet-flavored liqueur is a Creme de Violette. The Austrian-based company Rothman & Winter is the most popular in the United States, but there are a few other manufacturers. Creme Yvette was a liqueur originally manufactured by Charles Jacquin et Cie, Inc. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but production of it stopped in 1969. In 2010 Creme Yvette was brought back into production by Robert Cooper of Cooper Spirits Co. Robert Cooper is the inventor of St. Germain and the son of Norton Cooper, who was the previous owner of Charles Jacquin et Cie, Inc. Parfait d’Amour, on the other hand, is a bit of a free for all when it comes to flavor. A few different manufacturers make it, and each has its own recipe. The most common flavors are bitter almond, rose, orange, and vanilla.

In addition to color, another similarity these three liqueurs have in common is they are difficult to find. Used in a few cocktails before prohibition, Creme de Violette provided a nice floral flavor and gave their drinks a unique blue/purple color. It stopped being imported during prohibition, but Creme de Violette never returned once it ended.

After prohibition ended, many cocktails that used Creme de Violette began substituting with Creme Yvette or Parfait d’Amour. In the 1948 edition of David Embury’s book “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks,” he lists Creme Yvette or Parfait d’Amour as the liqueurs to use in a Blue Moon. Below the recipe, he even mentions just using blue curaçao. It’s not the taste that’s important but the color. In 2007 the Austrian company Rothman & Winter began importing Creme de Violette into the United States. For the first time in nearly 90 years, making pre-prohibition cocktails that used it became possible. As a result, Creme de Violette has become popular in the last decade along with anything that gives drinks a blue or purple color and looks Instagram-able.

Recipe Resources

NOTE: I have linked to the 1961 edition of the Embury book as that is the only one I can easily find online to link to, but the Blue Moon recipe is the same as the 1948 edition.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Blue Moon

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

259

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Blue Moon cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Creme De Violette

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Daiquiri No.4 – The Mistranslated Recipe

Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail
Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail

What Does the Mistranslated Daiquiri #4 Taste Like?

This is the mistranslated Daiquiri #4 recipe from the Bar La Florida cocktail book. Even though the English translation swapped the lime juice for lemon, it’s still a fabulous cocktail and my favorite of the numbered daiquiri variations from Bar La Florida. The lemon and maraschino liqueur combine perfectly and make a fantastic sour cocktail.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Daiquiri No.4

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

155

kcal
ABV

30%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a Daiquiri No.4 Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Champs Élysées – Original Recipe & History

Champs Élysées Cocktail
Champs Élysées Cocktail

The History Of The Champs Élysées Cocktail.

Champs Élysées is French for Elysian Fields and is named after the famous French avenue that terminates at the Arc de Triomphe. The earliest record of this cocktail comes from the 1925 book “Drinks Long and Short” by Nina Toye & A. H. Adair. I love this drink, and while I have never given that book more than a passing glance, this recipe is a standout hit from it. Most people will know this cocktail recipe from the later Savoy Cocktail Book printed in 1930. The Savoy Cocktail Book is regarded as one of the best European cocktail books to come out of the period, and it’s fitting that it includes this recipe. It is an example of how cocktails changed during the American prohibition era. Even though it was first printed in the 1925 book “Drinks long and short, ” the Savoy helped introduce Americans to cocktails made with less common liqueurs and aperitifs such as Chartreuse, which were more familiar with European cocktails.

What Does The Champs Élysées Taste Like?

The oaky wine flavor of the brandy is perfectly balanced by the herbal flavor of the Green Chartreuse, and the acidic citrus is cut perfectly by the syrup. It tastes like an herbal brandy sour, but its proportions make it balanced and tasty. If you have never had this, you don’t know what you are missing—one of the top 5 drinks I have ever had.

The Most Important Ingredient

The most essential ingredient in the Champs Élysées is the Green Chartreuse. Its unique green herb flavor shapes the drink. Any ordinary brandy will work, and in fact, I wouldn’t use a lovely sipping one. It would be a waste since the Chartreuse becomes the primary flavor. Fortunately, there is only one Green Chartreuse, so you can’t make this wrong since it’s a pretty short list of ingredients. Unfortunately, Green Chartreuse costs around $60 a bottle, making this a pretty pricy drink to make at home.

Who Were Nina Toye & A. H. Adair?

Nina Toye and A. H. Adair are very mysterious, considering they wrote a book with the first appearance of a few famous cocktails. Simple google searches bring up almost nothing, and even trying to thumb through some digital archives brings up very little. One source says that Nina Toye & A. H. Adair was a pseudonym for J. E. Plowman. I did locate a former WWI British officer named J. E. Plowman but nothing else on the name. The online source also says the book’s french translation “Petits Et Grands Verres” uses a different pseudonym of Philibert Le Huby, but I found that book still lists Nina Toye and A. H. Adair as the authors. Every reference I found to J. E. Plowman seems to be a copy-paste/scrape of the same information. Another lead brought me to American author Ann Huston Miller whose nickname was Nina, who eventually married English music critic and educator John Francis Toye. I could not find any books published under the name Ann Huston Miller, but I did find several other books under the name Nina Toye. A book in 1916 called “Death Rider,” A book in 1921 called “The Shadow of Fear,” and a book in 1935 called “The Twice Murdered Man.” A. H. Adair was a British food critic and food writer whose full name was Alec Henry Adair. So to me, it appears that an author and food critic without prior bartending experience but with a passion for cocktails came together to produce this one-off cocktail book.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Champs Élysées Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

202

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Champs Élysées Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Angostura Bitters

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 oz Green Chartreuse

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Pendennis Club – Original Recipe & History

Pendennis Cocktail
Pendennis Cocktail

The History Of The Pendennis Club Cocktail.

Invented at the Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky. The brandy used in this is traditionally either apricot or peach brandy, and yes, it is better with apricot or peach brandy, but if you do not have those, then an ordinary brandy will work. No one knows when the Pendennis Club cocktail was invented. The Pendennis Club was founded in 1881, but the cocktail recipe wasn’t printed until 1939. It was first published in 1939 in Charles Baker’s Gentleman’s Companion, giving us a 60-year window between 1881 and 1939 for when the cocktail was most likely invented.

Many references say this cocktail first appeared in the 1908 book, The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them, but I couldn’t find it anywhere. Many also specify the use of apricot brandy instead of peach, but ultimately no one knows for sure which is more authentic. With no clear genesis for this cocktail, it’s hard to pin down an entirely authentic and original recipe. Regardless, It’s good whether you use apricot or peach.

What Does The Pendennis Taste Like?

The taste of the Pendennis Club is unique from other sour cocktails. It’s boozy like a Hemingway but comes across to me as some herbal Daiquiri. It’s kind of hard to describe this one as it’s slightly sour, mildly sweet, and fruity with a hint of herbal flavor. The other ingredients balance the higher proof of this drink.

Using The Right Peach Or Apricot Brandy.

The most essential ingredient in the Pendennis Club is, without a doubt, brandy. All the other ingredients are pretty straightforward, but the peach or apricot brandy makes this sour special. There are three kinds of apricot or peach brandies you find:

  1. Peach/apricot schnapps. Cheap and very common to find. It’s very sweet and around 15% – 20% ABV.
  2. Peach/apricot flavored brandy. On the cheap side too and not too hard to find. It tastes fine like you dissolved a few peach gummy candies in actual brandy. Around 30% – 35% ABV.
  3. Actual dry peach/apricot fruit brandy. Often pretty expensive and almost impossible to find. Drier taste, like a standard brandy with a slight hint of peach flavor. I have only ever seen these at small-batch specialty distillers that make cool, hip spirits—around 40% ABV.

So all that being explained, you’re the best bet for making this cocktail is using a flavored brandy. It’s accessible and tastes good in this cocktail too. Peach/apricot schnapps is too sweet for this drink, but I also find the actual dry brandies to be too dry. There are times when more expensive liqueurs or spirits work well in cocktails, but there are many times when cheaper ones work better. This is one of those times. Your run-of-the-mill peach/apricot flavored brandy works excellent in this cocktail.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Pendennis Club

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

308

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Pendennis Club Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Peychauds Bitters

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 2/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 oz Peach Brandy

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Daiquiri No. 3 – Classic Grapefruit Daiquiri

Daiquiri No.3 Cocktail
Daiquiri No.3 Cocktail

What Does the Daiquiri #3 Taste Like?

The Bar La Florida has three variations of the daiquiri that are fantastic. This is the grapefruit variation, and it’s beautiful. The Bar La Florida expertly balanced alcohol, tartness, sweetness, and flavor. The Daiquiri #3 still has the qualities of a daiquiri but with an unmistakable grapefruit flavor. If you are a fan of grapefruit, this is a must-try.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Daiquiri No. 3

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

234

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Daiquiri No.3.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 1 tsp Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


South Side – Classic Recipe & History

South Side
South Side

The Origins Of The South Side.

The most popular origin story for the south side is named after Chicago’s Southside and was invented to mask the poor quality of the prohibition-era gin. This history is gripping because it ties the south side to famous prohibition mobster Al Capone who famously supplied Chicago with his “bathtub gin.” Unfortunately, this story is most likely more fun than it is true. Every city has a southside area, and the canon version of this cocktail from the Club 21 is located in lower Manhattan. So is the south side’s name referring to the Southside of Manhattan or Chicago? Who knows. Was it invented in Chicago and then popularized in New York.

To give extra weight that it is from New York, the oldest printed recipe I could find for this cocktail comes from the 1946 Stock Club Bar Book by Lucius Beebe. Their recipe is essentially a gin mojito identical to the Bar La Florida’s Mojito #2 recipe from their 1935 book. Both even serve the drink in a highball glass with ice. Granted, the south side fizz is a regular collins style cocktail, so it’s not unreasonable to think that two people just happened to come up with each drink independently of the other. I did not find this cocktail in any books coming out of Chicago in the 1930s or 1940s. I may not have checked all of them, but I matched some major ones and did not find a South Side cocktail.

Serving A South Side.

The most common way a south side is served in a cocktail glass resembling more of a sour than a highball fizz. I prefer this way, and even though the 1946 Stock Club recipe calls for it being served in a highball glass with ice. I’m going to go with the more daisy-like serving because I want to make it different from the older Cuban gin mojito mentioned above. I don’t see a point in having the same cocktail with different names so I will give that honor to the older recipe. The other reason is it’s just delicious as a daisy, and the mint makes it unique from other daisies. However, it is right and depends on whether you want a nice cool sipping cocktail or a short, strong sour.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

South Side

4 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

219

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Classic South Side Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 3 Mint leaves

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Soda Water

Directions

  • Muddle mint leaves and simple syrup together in shaker.
  • Add the other ingredients and ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously Shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain using double strainer to remove mint bits

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Daiquiri No.2 – Classic Orange Daiquiri

Daiquiri No.2 Cocktail
Daiquiri No.2 Cocktail

What Does the Daiquiri #2 Taste Like?

I love the Bar La Florida variations of the Daiquiri. The Daiquiri #2 is a delicious orange-flavored variation of the original. It’s a little sweeter but it’s not too sweet. It still balances the alcohol and tart flavors while having a slightly sweet orange taste.

The History Of the Daiquiri

The common history of the Daiquiri was invented in late 1800 by the American miner Jennings Cox. Cox was a manager at the Daiquiri mines in Santiago, Cuba. Some put the creation of the daiquiri around 1905, but regardless it’s often thought to have been invented during that range. Who knows if this is true or not? Even the most academic articles I can find on Caribbean cocktails put an asterisk on this statement and say it is just the story that has survived through the years.

We can definitively say the Daiquiri’s first published appearances came around 1913. The earliest Daiquiri recipe comes from the 1913 cocktail book “Straub’s Manual” by Jacques Straub. The recipe is actually pretty awful, but it is the oldest. It’s 2 oz lime juice, 1 oz rum, and a tsp of sugar. Interestingly the daiquiri is spelled with a “g” instead of a “q” as daiguiri. Every American cocktail book until prohibition spells it this way, and any news article mentioning the daiquiri mines spells it this way too. The Daiquiri mines were an important topic during the lead-up to the Spanish-American war, and all of the journalism from this time spelled it with a “g” too. It’s not too surprising it was misspelled, though. This was the start of yellow journalism, and most national news leading up to the Spanish-American war was not concerned with accuracy. The best early recipe for the daiquiri comes from the 1914 U.S. Navy Standard Publication. A periodical by the U.S. Navy mentions the Daiquiri as the latest in cocktail clubdom. They also spelled it correctly. The recipe they provide is a pony of rum, the juice of half a lime or lemon, and a little bit of sugar. Generally, half a lime provides 1/2 oz of juice, and I’ll take a little bit of sugar to be either a tsp or 1/3 of an oz, but they were not trying to be precise.

In the 1931 book “Cuban Cookery” by Blanche de Baralt, the author states that cocktails were not part of the culture in Cuba before the Spanish-American War. American-style cocktails were first brought there by the soldiers stationed there and the tourist that soon followed. Enamored with the high-quality rum and juices available on the island, many new Cuban cocktails were invented. She specifically calls out the Daiquiri. Baralt provides an alternative origin for the Daiquiri that sounds more accurate. She states the U.S. Naval Officers stationed in Guantanamo Bay made the drink on base and named it after the nearby mining town. This makes much more sense to me, and it would also explain why one of the earliest records of the daiquiri comes from a U.S. Naval publication and that they are the only ones to spell it correctly for decades.

Most people probably know the recipe from the two main cocktail books to come out of Cuba in the 1930s. Sloppy Joe’s and Bar La Florida. Sloppy Joe’s recipe is more on the sour end with a whole ounce of lime juice, but Bar La Florida’s recipe is identical to the U.S. Navy recipe. A comment brought this to my attention, but the Bar La Florida cocktail book is mistranslated. The Bar La Florida cocktail book has Spanish on the left and English on the right; in every place, limes are mentioned, and the English side says lemons. The book uses the older term for limes, limón verde, but the English translation says lemons. Just keep that in mind when looking at recipes in that book.

Recipe Resources

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Daiquiri No.2

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

173

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Daiquiri No. 2

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Orange Juice

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 3 dashes Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Cosmopolitan – Original Recipe & History

Cosmopolitan Cocktail
Cosmopolitan Cocktail

The History Of The Cosmopolitan.

Like the Margarita, many people claim to have invented the Cosmopolitan cocktail. The oldest known written reference to it comes from the 1934 book Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars. This is a somewhat different drink other than the name and a light pink hue. The 1934 recipe is a Jigger of Gordon’s Gin, two dash Cointreau, Juice of 1 Lemon, and 1 tsp Raspberry Syrup. While many have claimed to invent the Cosmo, the internationally recognized one was created by Toby Cecchini.

The Cosmopolitan is not a very old cocktail; it was invented in New York in 1987 by Toby Cecchini while working at The Odeon. Toby’s Cosmo was a huge hit. It quickly spread across New York and eventually caught national attention once celebrities started getting photographed drinking New York’s fabulous new bright pink cocktail. It gets its distinctive color from the single ounce of cranberry juice added. The Cosmopolitan enjoyed mild fame throughout the mid-90s, but that changed once Sex and the City aired in 1998. The fictional character Carrie Bradshaw’s favorite cocktail turned the Cosmopolitan into an overnight superstar.

Women wanting to imitate Carrie became obsessed with this cocktail. Sadly just as fast as it became the hot new drink, it became associated with trashy rich girls and a social faux pas to order. This is unfortunate because this is a beautiful drink.

What Does The Cosmopolitan Taste Like?

The Cosmopolitan is a delicious cocktail. It is pretty strong (around 25% abv) and not overly sweet. It gets its distinctive bright pink color from the single ounce of cranberry juice added. This adds a slightly sweet and tart red fruit flavor to the cocktail that is structurally a vodka daisy. A Cosmo tastes more like a cranberry margarita than anything else and is just as strong if made correctly. Sadly, it is a bit of a faux pas to order and is seen as a “girly” drink with a promiscuous connotation. Again independent of history, the Cosmopolitan cocktail is anything but that, but it can’t escape the image it’s been given.

There isn’t any best vodka to use with this. The whole idea about mixing with vodka is the spirit should be invisible to the other flavors, and even most cheap to the middle of the road, vodka tastes fine. I wouldn’t use expensive or nice vodka.

Should The Cosmopolitan Be Made With Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, Or Triple Sec?

The essential ingredient in a Cosmopolitan is the orange liqueur. Cointreau, grand mariner, curaçao, and triple sec are the same ingredients. They are all orange liqueurs. All the different names are either due to brand names or marketing gimmicks. However, it is essential to try them all and find one you like, and stick with it. I like Cointreau’s clean, dry, bright orange flavor the best, and I use it in the Cosmopolitan. Also, Grand Mariner’s base spirit is aged brandy, so it has a brown tint, and Cointreau is clear. If you use grand Mariner in this cocktail, it will have a muddy pink color instead of bright pink. For the appearance to look proper, use Cointreau or another clear orange liqueur. Many other orange liqueurs are good, but I have not found one for under $20 that I liked. Any in the sub $10 range are garbage. I love a deal and try not to spend more than is reasonable, but orange liqueur is one ingredient you can not get cheap.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Download The Official Vintage American Cocktails App

Discover what classic cocktails you can make right now with the ingredients you have. Check out the Vintage American Cocktail app.

Cosmopolitan

5 from 2 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

250

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the Cosmopolitan Cocktail. A Classic New York Cocktail that is as delicious as it is beautiful.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Cranberry Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Citrus Favored Vodka

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards

Recipe Video

Notes

Advertisements

Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.