Golden Glow – Recipe

Golden Glow Cocktail
Golden Glow Cocktail

How can you go wrong with this drink? It has everything good in it. It kind of toes the line between being an Old Fashion style cocktail and a Tiki drink.

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Golden Glow

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

177

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Golden Glow.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Black Rum

  • 1.5 oz Irish Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Corpse Reviver No.2 – Original Recipe & History

Corpse Reviver No.2
Corpse Reviver No.2

Kina Lillet Substitute: Should You Use Lillet Blanc Or Cocchi Americano?

Unfortunately, the original ingredient Kina Lillet was discontinued by the Lillet company in 1986. What replaced it is Lillet Blanc, but Lillet Blanc is a different wine from what Kina Lillet was. I will clearly say I have personally never tasted the now defunct Kina Lillet. But from other sources and individuals familiar with its taste, most say Cocchi Americano is closer to what Kina Lillet used to taste like than Lillet Blanc. So even though it shares the Lillet name, you may want to substitute Cocchi Americano for the Kina Lillet. For any pre-1980s cocktail that calls for Kina Lillet, use Cocchi Americano.

What Does The Corpse Reviver No.2 Taste Like?

So the corpse reviver no.2 will taste different depending on if you use Lillet Blanc or Cocchi Americano. Again the two aperitifs taste similar, but the corpse reviver no.2 made with Cocchi will have a very slight woody sweet bitterness. The one made with Lillet will not. That woody, sweet bitterness reminds me of tamarind. The corpse reviver no.2 is a beautiful balance of sweet and sour citrus, herbal, and fruit flavors. The Lillet version will be a bit less sweet than the one made with Cocchi, but the Cocchi one has a nice woody-ness the one made with Lillet lacks.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1930, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

Recipe Resources

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Corpse Reviver No.2

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

132

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Corpse Reviver No.2.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Absinthe

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Cocchi Americano

  • 2/3 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes

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Side Car – Original Recipe & History

Sidecar
Sidecar

The History Of The Side Car

The Side Car is often considered a French cocktail, which I believed too for many years, but it is British. Barman Pat MacGarry invented the Side-Car at Buck’s Club sometime between 1919 and 1923. We know this because the earliest printed recipe for the Side Car comes from the 1923 book “Harry of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails” by Harry McElhone. McElhone credits Pat MacGarry for inventing the Side Car while at Buck’s Club. In the 1925 Frech cocktail book “L’Art du Shaker” by Dominique Migliorero. Migliorero also credits the creation of the Side Car to MacGarry of London. Buck’s Club opened in 1919. Therefore Pat MacGarry had to have invented it between 1919 and 1923.

The History Of Buck’s Club London

The Buck Club was founded in 1919 by Herbert Buckmaster of the Royal Horse Guard. Herbert Buckmaster intended Buck’s Club to be an upper-class club with less of the stuffiness of other elite London clubs. One of Buckmaster’s requirements for the club was it should have an American-style bar. Not uncommon in hotels that served guests from overseas, but the idea of an American Bar in a prestigious invite-only boys club was unheard of. Buckmaster hired Pat MacGarry to head his American Bar. MacGarry never published his own cocktail book, but he is credited with having invented the Buck’s Fizz and the side-car. To this day, Buck’s Club is still an all-boys, invitation-only club.

Recipe Resources

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Side Car

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Side Car.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1.5 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Pink Lady – Recipe

Pink Lady Cocktail
Pink Lady Cocktail

Invented somewhere around the early 1900s, this cocktail was named after a broadway show called The Pink Lady. Oddly enough, this old-time pink cocktail shares a similar history to a more modern pink cocktail, the Cosmopolitan. Both are incredible drinks that became wildly popular during their days but soon fell from favor as they became associated with being girly drinks. However, the Cosmo and Pink Lady are nothing to mess with. Both of these drinks taste amazing and will lay you out if made right. So if drinking a Pink Lady is girly, count me one of the girls.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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Pink Lady

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Pink Lady.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg Whites

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Apple Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Hemingway Daiquiri – Classic Recipe & History

Hemingway Daiquiri
Hemingway Daiquiri

History Of The Hemingway Daiquiri

The Hemingway Daiquiri is not the Papa Doble. The two are often considered the same, and the Hemingway daiquiri is also called a Papa Doble. The Papa Doble was a very different cocktail that most people would not like. The Hemingway Daiquiri as we know it today started to appear around the 1960s. One of its earliest references is from the publication ” Cuba, Paloma de Vuelo Popular” by Nestor Teran. Teran refers to the cocktail as the Hemingway Special at Bar Floridita. If Hemingway had this cocktail, it was probably much later in his life (he passed in 1961), and residents knew this was not the Papa Doble but a different cocktail entirely. The 1972 Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide calls this drink the Floridita Special. Victor Bergeron’s cocktail information is often very much on point. He didn’t just know tiki but traditional cocktails and Caribbean cocktails too. As a bartender from the 1930s to 1970s, his knowledge of cocktails is trustworthy. The earliest Hemingway Daiquiri recipes are shaken with crushed ice and dirty poured into a glass like the Papa Doble, but the Trader Vic recipe is blended into a slushy cocktail. Thus taking on its current form.

By the 1990s, every publication I found simultaneously calls the Papa Doble the Hemingway Daiquiri. The list is too numerous to cite, so the example I will mention is the 1998 book “The Hemingway Cookbook” by Craig Boreth. Boreth implies that the Hemingway Daiquiri is also called the Papa Doble, Wild Daiquiri, and Daiquiri Special. A lot of names for one drink.

Recipe Resources

Papa Doble References

Hemingway Daiquiri References

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Hemingway Daiquiri

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Hemingway Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1/2 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1.5 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Gimlet – Classic Recipe & History

Gimlet
Gimlet

History Of The Gimlet.

This common history of the gimlet is it was invented by Sir Thomas Desmond Gimlette, a doctor for the British Royal Navy sometime in the early 1900s, who thought to mix lime juice with gin.

The issue with this is I can’t find any evidence of this. I’ve searched the British digital national archives, Royal Navy medical records, Uk newspapers, and periodicals. While I can find records on Thomas Gimlette, I can’t find any record of him prescribing or administering lime and gin or being invented by him. The two earliest Gimlet recipes I can find in books come from the 1923 book “Harry of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing” and the 1930 “Savoy Cocktail Book.” Both recipes are the same. Both are half lime cordial and dry gin. If Harry Craddock and Harry McElhone agree on this recipe, there must be something to it. McElhone even states in his book that the Gimlet is popular among the UK Navy.

Investigating lime cordial’s use a bit deeper, I can find an advertisement from 1872 (reprinted in an 1874 directory) by Rose & Co stating their new sweetened lime juice cordial goes well with gin, rum, and whisky. In 1868 Lauchlan Rose, a Royal naval goods supplier, invented a method of preserving concentrated lime juice with sugar instead of alcohol. Alcohol was the preferred method of preserving citrus for seamen, but the intense sour flavor was off-putting to most people, and many seamen would dilute the citrus concentrate with their daily booze rations to dilute the taste (This is the origin of sour cocktails). As a naval supplier, Lauchlan Rose began selling his improved citrus concentrate to the Royal Navy, quickly becoming a hit with the sailors. The sailors still mixed their daily ration of citrus concentrate with their ration of alcohol, and thus the gimlet was born. Perhaps it was named after Sir Thomas Desmond Gimlette or the gimlet tool, but its origin seems more closely related to the Rose company than any specific person.

Recipe Resources

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Gimlet Cocktail

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

253

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Gimlet cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Lime Cordial

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the serving glass.
  • Stir and serve at room temperature for a true 1870s Royal Navy experience or add ice to cool the drink.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Frisco Sour – Classic Recipe

Frisco Sour Cocktail
Frisco Sour Cocktail

Benedictine makes anything taste herbal, and this is an herbal tasting Whiskey Sour. Despite that description, it is good, and the Benedictine balances well with the rest of the drink. Don’t buy Benedictine to try this, but give it a shot if you have some.

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Frisco Sour

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

33%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Frisco Sour cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Benedictine

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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French 75 – Original Recipe & History

French 75 Cocktail
French 75 Cocktail

The History Of The French 75

The French 75 cocktail was named after the WWI French 75mm light field canon. The earliest reference to the French 75 is a cocktail called the “75” in Harry MacElhone’s 1923 book “Harry of Ciro,” but that was completely different than what we typically consider a French 75 today. Mac Elhones’ recipe contained 2 oz apple brandy, 1 oz dry gin, 1 tsp grenadine, and two dashes absinthe. MacElhone states that this cocktail was very popular in France during the Great War (WWI) and was named after the French 75mm canon. So this is the same cocktail, just a different recipe. I believe this is the original French recipe for the French 75. MacElhone mentioned other french cocktails before they became popular, and grenadine was amazingly popular in France during this time. Grenadine became popular in France during the mid-1890s and stayed that way. The recipe looks like a cocktail that would be popular in 1910s France. This is the only time this recipe appears, and it is not the canon recipe used from the 1930s on.

The first publication of the French 75 cocktail we commonly see today comes from a 1926 UK periodical called “The Judge.” In volume 90 of the Judge. The recipe in The Judge is exactly the French 75 recipe used today, but oddly the article writer says the cocktail comes from “somewhere east of the Suez” the Suez is in eastern Egypt, and I don’t believe for one second this cocktail came from the Middle East. It’s not uncommon for some cocktails to get exotic origin stories to make them sound more interesting. Cocktail origins often get simplified when people don’t know to “oh, the margarita was made for a girl named Margarita” or “Oh, the Negroni was made by a man named Mr. Negroni.” if you are curious about the most likely origins of the Margarita or Negroni check out my articles on them.

The oldest cocktail book to publish the current French 75 recipe was the 1928 book “Here’s How!” by Judge Jr. His recipe is the same as “The Judge” periodicals recipe. Both of these recipes call for the drink to be served in a tall highball glass with cracked ice, but it is more common to see it served today in a Champagne flute without ice.

What Does The French 75 Taste Like?

The French 75 is both a strong and an easy-to-sip cocktail. The French 75 has an ABV of around 15% and is a boozier version of the John Collins. That’s also a good way to describe it. It tastes like a slightly sweeter and boozier John Collins. These come up on you fast too. A few of these, and you’re done for.

Recipe Resources

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French 75

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

609

kcal
ABV

15%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the French 75.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 5 oz Sparkling Wine

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients except for the sparkling wine in a shaker with ice.
  • Gently throw the drink between the two shaking tins so it will chill without over diluting.
  • Pour into the serving glass.
  • Lastly, gently pour the sparkling wine into the glass so it evenly mix with the other ingredients and keeps as much of its carbonation as possible.

Recipe Video

Notes

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Clover Club – Original Recipe & History

Clover Club Cocktail
Clover Club Cocktail

The Clover Club cocktail was the signature cocktail of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel’s Clover Club in Philadelphia. The Clover Club men’s club was in operation from the early 1880s to the beginning of prohibition in 1920. The first printing I was able to find of the Clover Club cocktail is from the 1917 book The Ideal Bartender by Tom Bullock. The recipe in that book is “Fill large bar glass 1/2 full fine Ice. 1/2 pony Raspberry syrup. 1/2 jigger dry gin. 1/2 jigger French vermouth. White of 1 egg. Shake well; strain into a cocktail glass and serve.” That more or less translates to 15mls raspberry, 20mls gin, 20mls vermouth, and 30 mls egg white.

I found online that Dave Wondrich found an older printing of it from the 1909 Drinks – How to mix and serve by Paul Lowe. I did my best to look that one up, but I couldn’t personally find it anywhere. I found a picture of the book’s cover but not the recipe, and copies sell for around 300 clams. So I’m not buying that to verify this short entry.

Like the Rose cocktail, common variations of the Clover Club use grenadine or currant syrup instead of Raspberry, but Raspberry is the preferred choice. No one knows what the original Clover Club’s version of its house drink was. We have a few old, pretty good guesses. The recipe I have listed is my best guess at smashing together some of the old guesses while keeping with how other old drinks similar to the clover club were made. Another common way to make it is with 60 mls gin instead of 30 gin and 30 dry vermouth. As I get older, I’m starting to like dry vermouth more and more and slightly prefer the clover club with both; younger, but when I was, I wouldn’t say I liked dry vermouth and liked the straight gin one better. So really, it’s up to what you prefer or have on hand, but both are good ways to make it.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizz has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any fizz cocktail is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is using a dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. You have to get the science right for egg whites to foam properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time was using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. It is much, much harder to form a foam without using an acid. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making fizzes with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your Fizz, what will happen is the foam will develop, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble foam.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. There are a lot of tips and tricks out there for making fizzes, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

Recipe Resources

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Clover Club

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

171

kcal
ABV

14%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Clover Club cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg White

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Raspberry Syrup

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 1 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Blinker – Original Recipe

Blinker
Blinker

First popping up in the 1930s, this little whiskey cocktail is refreshing. A popular substitute for grenadine in this cocktail is regular old raspberry syrup, as you would find in the pancake section of a grocery store. If you don’t have raspberry syrup, you can use grenadine, but that’s up to you.

Recipe Resources

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Blinker Cocktail

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Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

198

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Blinker cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1/3 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Rye Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes

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Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.