Lemon Drop Cocktail

Lemon Drop Martini – Original 1970s Norman Jay Hobday Recipe

Invented in the 1970s in San Francisco by Norman Jay Hobday, this drink is essentially a fancy Vodka Sour. It replaces the simple syrup with orange liqueur and has a fun catchy name too. I leave the word martini off this intentionally because there is nothing martini about this. This is a sour through and through and has more in common with the Sidecar than a Dry Martini. Bars just like putting this drink in a Martini glass for some reason, thus the confusion.

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Lemon Drop Martini – Original 1970s Norman jay Hobday Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

235

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Lemon Drop Martini.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Vodka

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Matador Cocktail

Matador Cocktail – Original 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

A more contemporary take on the Matador, this recipe is more tiki like than its original older British version. It was first published in the 1937 Cafe Royal Cocktail Book by William J. Tarling. Don’t go looking too hard for this book, there is only one left in the world, but thanks to the power of the internet you can google a free pdf version of it. If you want to make the original 1937 version it’s equal parts of orange liqueur, dry vermouth and tequila.

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Matador Cocktail – Original 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

189

kcal
ABV

12%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Matador.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice

  • 4 oz Pineapple Juice

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Leather Neck Cocktail

Leatherneck Cocktail – Original 1940s Frank Farrell Recipe

Think of this as a green whiskey Margarita or a green sidecar. This cocktail gets its name from the strange army fatigue green color it has which is achieved with the use of blue orange liqueur. Like any of the blue orange liqueur cocktails in this app I just use a drop of blue food coloring so I don’t have to actually buy the blue one.

The Leatherneck was invented a little after WWII by former marine Frank Farrell and true to its name, this drink is an ass kicker. It goes down strong and gets the job done.

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Leatherneck Cocktail – Original Frank Farrell 1940s Recipe

5 from 1 vote
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Leatherneck cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Blue Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker and add 1 drop of blue food dye if you do not have blue orange Liqueur.
  • Add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake the ingredients till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Last Word Cocktail

Last Word – Original Detroit Athletic Club Cocktail Recipe

History Of The Last Word

Invented at the Detroit Athletic Club (DAC), sometime before 1916, the last word survived thanks to a New York stage actor. The last word is often credited with having been invented by Frank Fogarty, but, after research done by the DAC itself, the last word was actually invented sometime before Frank Fogarty brought it to New York. Frank Fogarty was a vaudeville actor in New York during the earlier part of the 20th century and is credited in Ted Saucier’s 1951 book “Bottom’s Up!” for having “introduced [The Last Word] around here [New York] about thirty years ago”. (Ted Saucier took over historical records and publications for The Waldorf-Astoria after Albert Stevens Crockett. A.S. Crockett is the person who compiled the original Waldorf-Astoria’s bars cocktail recipes into the famous Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book.) Due to the drinks present day popularity the DAC did a bit of research and found an old 1916 decorative souvenir menu with the last word listed for 35 cents. The menu was most likely printed to celebrate the clubs much larger and much more impressive new building on Madison Avenue in 1915. It is unknown if the last word predates the 1916 souvenir menu and if so, by how much. The club first opened in 1887, so somewhere between those two years the drink was invented. The Detroit Metro Times has a very good article about the Last Word it reprinted with the DAC permission that was first published in a 2015 edition of The Detroit Athletic Club Magainze.

The cocktail wasn’t commonly made again until 2003 when Seattle bartender Murray Stenson found a copy of “Bottoms Up!”. He added this forgotten cocktail to his Seattle bar’s drink menu and it was a hit. The Last Word became popular in the Pacific Northwest, eventually was made on television as the hot new Seattle cocktail and soon spread to the rest of the country.

How Does It Taste

I personally love the taste of this cocktail. The Last Word has a clean bright herbal, cherry, citrus flavor that is wonderful but unfortunately not for everyone. If you have ever had Green Chartreuse before and are not a fan then this cocktail will not change your mind. the Green Chartreuse flavor is not too strong but its still the most forward flavor.

Most important Ingredient

The most important ingredient in the Last Word cocktail is the gin. The dryness of the gin is what saves this cocktail from being way too flavorful and herbaceous. The drier and cleaner the gin is the better. Don’t use a fancy flavorful sipping gin in this cocktail, because the Green Chartreuse is already such a strong unique herbal flavor that any more strong herbal flavor is just too much. The lime juice and Maraschino Liqueur help cut that flavor and add more complexity but its the clean dryness of the gin that mellows the drink. I personally feel using vodka instead of gin makes for a more balanced cocktail, but the classic recipe calls for dry gin. Something like a Bombay dry gin (normal Bombay, not Sapphire) and Beefeater work very well in this.

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Last Word – Original Detroit Athletic Club Cocktail Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

184

kcal
ABV

31%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Last Word.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 2/3 oz Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Green Chartreuse

  • 2/3 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Holland House Cocktail

Holland House – Original 1906 George Kappeler Recipe

Invented at the Holland House in New York City by George Kappeler, this was first published in his 1906 book Modern American Drinks. While also being named after the Holland House building this was also their house cocktail made with Holland style gin, so the name of this drink kinda covers all its bases. This is a wonderful cocktail that kinda has a taste of Martini meets Gin Sour.

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Holland House – Original George Kappeler Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

287

kcal
ABV

27%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Holland House.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Maraschino Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Genever

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Golden Glow Cocktail

Golden Glow – A Refreshing Whiskey & Rum Cocktail

How can you go wrong with this drink. It has everything good in it. It kinda toes the line between being an Old Fashion style cocktail and a Tiki drink.

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Golden Glow – A Refreshing Whiskey & Rum Cocktail

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

177

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Golden Glow.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Orange Juice

  • 1 tsp Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Black Rum

  • 1.5 oz Irish Whiskey

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Corpse Reviver No.2 Cocktail

Corpse Reviver No.2 – Original 1934 Savoy Cocktail Book Recipe

Lillet Blanc And It’s Substitutes

The official recipe uses Lillet Blanc but the Lillet Blanc we have today is fairly different from the Lillet Blanc Harry Craddock or Ian Fleming used. In 1985 the product line changed ownership and the recipe was reformulated to make it more appealing. The sweetness and bitterness of Lillet Blanc was reduced and resulted in a more modern flavor profile. That being said it still makes very good cocktails but a more accurate ingredient might be Cocchi Americano. Cocchi Americano is still a quinine infused, bitter sweet, white wine aperitif more similar to how Lillet Blanc used to taste before it was reformulated. My suggestion is to buy both and try making drinks with each and see which you like better. Hey maybe they changed it for the better. The two aperitifs are not too expensive either so buying a bottle of each is doable. Both taste of dried fruit, citrus, and honey but the difference is Lillet Blanc scales back the sweetness and bitterness where Cocchi Americano does not. I personally feel Lillet is better for sipping and Cocchi is better for mixing.

What Does The Corpse Reviver No.2 Taste Like

So the corpse reviver no.2 will taste different depending on if you use Lillet Blanc or Cocchi Americano. Again the two aperitifs taste similar but the corpse reviver no.2 made with Cocchi will have a very slight woody sweet bitterness to it the one made with Lillet will not. That woody sweet bitterness reminds me of tamarind. The corpse reviver no.2 is a wonderful balance of sweet and sour citrus, herbal and fruit flavors. The Lillet version will be a bit less sweet than the one made with Cocchi but the Cocchi one has a nice woody-ness the one made with Lillet lacks.

The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London

Opened in 1893 The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American style cocktails in London to the British upperclass. The American Bar has always been a high end bar but what really set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became it’s head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high end hotel bars, but Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the american prohibition was coming to an end the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar and a year later they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934 The Savoy Cocktail Book documents all of the bars best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era, European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there though. A cocktail cost around $250 there and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Corpse Reviver No.2 – Original 1934 Savoy Cocktail book Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

132

kcal
ABV

24%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Corpse Reviver No.2.

Ingredients

  • 1 dash Absinthe

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Lillet Blanc or Cocchi Americano

  • 2/3 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2/3 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Sidecar

Sidecar Cocktail – Classic Early 1900s French Cocktail

This is the fancy French version of the Whiskey Sour. What makes it fancier is that it replaces simple syrup with orange liqueur and uses brandy instead of whiskey. It was invented during WWI and most likely came about by American soldiers wanting drinks that resembled Whiskey Sours while in France and the bartenders mixing drinks with their local liquor stock.

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Sidecar Cocktail – Classic EArly 1900s French Cocktail

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

229

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Sidecar.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Pink Lady Cocktail

Pink Lady Cocktail – Early 1900s Recipe

Invented somewhere around the early 1900s this cocktail was named after a broadway show during that time called The Pink Lady. Oddly enough this old time pink cocktail shares a similar history to a more modern pink cocktail, the Cosmopolitan. Both are incredible drinks that became wildly popular during their days but soon after fell from favor as they became associated with being girly drinks. Although the Cosmo and Pink Lady are nothing to mess with. If made right, both of these drinks taste amazing and will lay you out. So if drinking a Pink Lady is girly, then count me one of the girls.

The Most IMportant Ingredient

Cocktails with egg whites are actually difficult cocktails to get right and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made a fizzes or sour with egg whites has had one of these pop open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any cocktail with egg whites is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well is the dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice but you will end up working twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip it will pop open a little. as the egg whites unfold they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more important is chemistry. For a cocktail with egg whites to properly foam you have to get the science right. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I made for a long time is using is using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake I’m still starting off with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process along with beating it. In the cocktail we use lemon or lime juice. Without using an acid it is much much harder to form a foam. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making cocktail with egg whites with just liqueurs for sweeter alone and they have never formed a good foam. This needs actual simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your cocktail what will happen is the foam will form but it will collapse back into the liquid-y cocktail just as fast and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar also somehow makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubble head.

cocktail with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully the tips I gave help shorten that journey. Also theres a lot of tips and tricks out there for making eggs foam and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time and still I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the exact same. Its just the nature of the egg sometimes and I just accept it and make it again.

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Pink Lady Cocktail – Early 1900s Recipe

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

213

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Pink Lady.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg Whites

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 1/2 oz Apple Brandy

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
Hemingway Daiquiri Cocktail

Hemingway Daiquiri – Classic 1930s Bar La Florida Cuban Cocktail

Also called a Papa Doble this cocktail is credited to being invented by Ernest Hemingway (along with several other drinks) when he was not satisfied with the Daiquiri #3 at the La Florida bar in Havana, Cuba. Ernest Hemingway was a heavy drinker who also happened to be diabetic, therefore all the Hemingway inspired cocktails are heavy on the liquor and very light on sweetness. True to form the Daiquiri #3 was too sweet and not boozy enough for him so he requested if the bartender could make it less sweet and with more rum. Thus the Hemingway was invented.

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Hemingway Daiquiri – Classic 1930s Bar La Florida Cuban Cocktail

0 from 0 votes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

228

kcal
ABV

26%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Hemingway Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

  • 3 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.