Ideal Cocktail – Delicious 1933 Sloppy Joe’s Recipe

Ideal Cocktail Sloppy Joe
Ideal Cocktail Sloppy Joe

The Many Variations Of The Ideal Cocktail.

The Ideal cocktail was invented by Hugo Ensslin and is printed in his 1917 Book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks.” The ideal cocktail is a grapefruit variation of the martini, and you can see that in the way the cocktail changed over time. As Hugo saw it, a classic martini was what we would consider today to be a sweet martini. It is made of gin and sweet vermouth. During this time and more so into the 1930s, the dry martini becomes far more popular. Modifying Hugo’s original version based on the sweet martini, Jose Abeal (owner of Sloppy Joe’s) substituted sweet vermouth for dry vermouth (like the dry martini) but made up for the sweetness with a little bit of simple syrup. Grapefruit, dry vermouth, and dry gin are a bit much, and the drink needs a little sweetness to taste good. A clean and herbal grapefruit martini is more suited for a warm tropical climate.

The History Of Sloppy Joes Cuban Bar.

There are two famous pre-revolution Cuban bars. Well, there are at least two famous pre-revolution Cuban bars that printed books and provided future generations with their recipes—Bar La Florida and Sloppy Joe’s Bar, both in Havana, Cuba. Sloppy Joe’s was created by Spanish immigrant Jose Abeal. The 1936 edition of his book details his biography. Jose immigrated from Spain to Cuba in 1904, where he worked as a bartender for three years. He then moved to New Orleans, where he worked as a bartender for another six years, and then to Miami, where he worked for another six years. Upon moving back in 1918 to Cuba, he opened a liquor store and added a bar. When a few of his American friends visited, they commented on how dirty his store was. “Why, Joe, this place is certainly sloppy, look at the filthy water running from under the counter.” They were commenting on how he let the melted ice run all over the ground. His friends would call him dirty or sloppy Joe, and the name stuck. Jose sold classic American and Cuban drinks from his liquor store and bar and Spanish and Cuban food. One of the most popular food items he sold was a traditional Spanish picadillo sandwich. A loose ground beef sandwich where the beef is cooked with crushed tomatoes, Spanish olives, spices, and herbs became more commonly known as a sloppy Joe in the United States. Although Sloppy Joe’s Picadillo sandwich is nothing like the midwestern BBQ sauce covered, Manwich style sloppy joes most of us are used to.

A political revolution later, and Sloppy Joe’s fell on hard times. Now owned by the state and American tourists prohibited from visiting, Sloppy Joe only stayed open for a couple more years. The 1959 movie “Our Man In Havana,” starting Sir Alec Guinness, features some of Sloppy Joe’s in its prime before its business dried up. After a fire in 1965, the bar and store closed entirely with no real intention to ever open again. In 2013 though, the bar was restored, where it was, as it was, and currently sells the same drinks and food items as it did in the 1930s – 1950s.

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Ideal Cocktail – Sloppy Joe’s Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

239

kcal
ABV

23%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make an Ideal Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp Simple Syrup

  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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White Lady – Make This Beautiful 1934 Savoy Recipe

White Lady Cocktail
White Lady Cocktail

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

What Does The White Lady Taste Like?

The white lady is a fantastic velvety smooth cocktail that tastes like a gin lemon meringue. The flavor profile is similar to the sidecar or margarita, but the egg whites add a wonderful texture and smoothness.

Should You Use Cointreau, Triple Sec, Or Curaçao?

You can use Cointreau or triple sec/Curaçao/orange liqueur. Technically they are all orange liqueurs, and the only reason for the different names is history, marketing gimmicks, and brand names. Check out my orange liqueur description for a more detailed account of that. Again you don’t have to use Cointreau; any orange liqueur will work. On that note, though, Cointreau is the best and makes for what I think is a noticeably better cocktail. The only downside to Cointreau is its price tag. It’s a little pricier than other brands (around 50 bucks for a liter), but it’s worth it. There have been other delicious and pricy orange liqueurs to hit the market in the last few years, but Cointreau is still the go-to.

How To Get Egg White Right In Cocktails.

Cocktails with egg whites are difficult cocktails to get right, and anyone who says otherwise is projecting a false image. Everyone who has made fizzes or sour with egg whites has had one of these pops open on them while shaking, only to make a mess. The best advice I can pass on to making any cocktail with egg whites is it comes down to 2 things; Technique and chemistry. A common technique that works very well in the dry shake. A dry shake is shaking all your ingredients together without ice first to make forming the foam easier. The foam will still form with ice, but you will work twice as hard for half the result if you shake with ice first. The first shake is only about 20-30 seconds of vigorous shaking, but this is the part that forms most of your foam. A little tip here is to wrap a kitchen towel around the seal of your shaker because no matter how strong you are or how tight your grip, it will pop open a little. As the egg whites unfold, they can expand up to 8x their original size, thus increasing the pressure inside the shaker and forcing small amounts of the sugary egg mix to squirt out. Wrapping a small towel around the shaker will catch this and keep things clean.

Next and more critical is chemistry. You have to get the science right for a cocktail with egg whites to form properly. Denaturing/unfolding egg protein into a meringue is more science than brawn, and a friend of mine who is a baker once gave me this advice for how she made meringue at the bakery.

  1. Keep it room temperature.
  2. Use an acid to help break the proteins hydrogen bonds and unfold it in addition to beating it.
  3. Use sugar to stabilize the foam from collapsing and to form smaller bubbles.

A mistake I have made for a long time is using eggs fresh from the fridge. Even if I’m doing a dry shake, I’m still starting with cold ingredients. So take the eggs out and let them come to room temperature first. Cold egg protein is much more stable and difficult to break apart than if it is at room temperature. The next tip is to use acid. Bakers will use cream of tartar as the acid helps accelerate the denaturing process and beat it. In the cocktail, we use lemon or lime juice. Without using an acid, it is much harder to form a foam. The last bit of advice is to use sugar to stabilize the foamed protein from collapsing. A sweet liqueur alone isn’t enough. I’ve tried making a cocktail with egg whites with just liqueurs for sweeter alone, and they have never formed a good foam. This needs real simple syrup. If you don’t use sugar in your cocktail, the foam will form, but it will collapse back into the liquid just as fast, and you will be left with a thin layer of lame bubbles on top. It will still taste the same and be good, but that beautiful foam will be gone, and for these drinks, the large foam head is the garnish. The sugar makes the water “wetter” and helps keep the suspended air inside from combining into larger bubbles. This helps form a smoother micro bubblehead.

Cocktails with egg whites are some of the most elegant and sublime cocktails, but they are not the easiest to make. Eventually, you can get to a point where you can make them correctly and consistently, but it can take a while and many failed attempts. Hopefully, the tips I gave help shorten that journey. Also, there are many tips and tricks for shaking egg foam out there, and I tried to keep mine reasonable and realistic, but see what works for you. I’ve been doing this for a long time, and still, I have the occasional one that doesn’t foam up well, even though I make them all the same. It’s just the nature of the egg sometimes, and I accept it and make it again.

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White Lady Cocktail – Original 1934 Savoy Cocktail Guide Recipe

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

268

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a White Lady.

Ingredients

  • 1 Whole Egg Whites

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker without ice. Shake dry for 30 second – egg foams better when not cold.
  • Now add ice to the shaker. Vigorously shake again till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Jack Rose – Beautiful Classic Early 1900s Cocktail

Jack Rose
Jack Rose

This drink dates back to the early 1900s, and it is one of those drinks that everyone and their mother claimed they invented. The name for it most likely came from the fact that it was pink and made with apple brandy, the most common brand of apple brandy in the United States being Laird’s AppleJack.

Others, however say it was named after a gangster from that period. Think of this as a slightly sweeter and pink version of a Sidecar.

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Jack Rose

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

181

kcal
ABV

25%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Jack Rose.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Grenadine

  • 2 oz Apple Brandy

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Caipirinha – The Fantastic National Cocktail of Brazil

Caipirinha
Caipirinha

The caipirinha is the national cocktail of Brazil, and its taste is noticeably different from the Cuban daiquiri even though they are structurally very similar drinks. Since it uses cachaça instead of rum, it has more of a sweet green wood flavor than the caramelized flavors rum brings. Please read my description of cachaça for the flavor difference between rum and cachaça. Because rum and cachaça have such different flavors, it isn’t a caipirinha if you use anything other than cachaça. This cocktail also keeps the whole lime wedges in the drink, giving it a cool look.

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Caipirinha

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Brazilian
Servings

1

servings
Calories

231

kcal
ABV

31%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Caipirinha.

Ingredients

  • 1 Half of a Lime

  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz Cachaça

Directions

  • Muddle 3 lime wedges in the serving glass to get the juice and oils out of lime. Add ice to crushed ice to the glass.
  • Add the other ingredients into the glass with the limes.
  • Give the drink a couple turns and serve.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
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  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Daiquiri – Amazing Classic Late 1800s Cuban Cocktail

Daiquiri Cocktail
Daiquiri Cocktail

In the 1930s, Cuban cocktails started to become popular in the united states thanks to the writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. This cocktail was invented in the late 1800s by Jennings Cox, an American mining engineer living in Cuba at the time, and is named after the Daiquiri Mines he worked in the east of Santiago.

The oldest printed recipe I could find for this is from the 1935 Bar La Florida from Havana, Cuba, and it refers to Jennings’s original recipe as the Daiquiri Nom. 1, So I will call it the #1 here as well. The reason for this is the Bar then created three more versions of the daiquiri. The orange-flavored #2, The grapefruit-flavored #3, and the Lemon flavored #4. They also invented the Hemingway, which is boozier and less sweet #3.

I can’t say this is the exact #1 recipe from Bar La Florida as that one used lemon juice instead of lime. Most periphery writings around that same time that I found that Jenning’s original cocktail used lime and lemon, makes the #1 very similar to the #4. So I made this one lime for the sake of variety and with some precedent from most other writings.

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Daiquiri

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Cuban
Servings

1

servings
Calories

241

kcal
ABV

21%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Daiquiri.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2 oz White Rum

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Biter Cocktail – Make Savoy’s Beautiful Peridot Cocktail

Biter Cocktail
Biter Cocktail

What Does The Biter Cocktail Taste Like?

The Biter cocktail is very similar to the Last Word, and if you like the last word, you will like this one too. The Biter is a bit more boozy, complex, and herbal than the Last Word, but they are very similar again. This is a tough one to describe. It’s herbal, slightly sweet, and a little sour. Don’t be fooled by its pretty color. It’s very strong and very herbal.

A Short History Of The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel In London.

In 1893, The American Bar at the Savoy hotel started serving American-style cocktails in London to the British upper class. The American Bar has always been a high-end bar but what set it on the map was when Harry Craddock became its head bartender in the 1920s. Harry Craddock was a British-born bartender who immigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a US citizen and head bartender of several high-end hotel bars. Still, Harry found himself out of work with the start of prohibition in 1920. He then immigrated back to England and became head bartender of the Savoy Hotel’s Bar. Harry transformed The American Bar from a high-end bar to one of the seminal cocktail bars of the 20th century. As the American prohibition was ending, the hotel realized it should record all of its most famous recipes and the innovations Harry brought to the bar. A year later, they published the Savoy Cocktail Book. Printed in 1934, the Savoy Cocktail Book documents the bar’s best recipes from the 1890s to the 1930s and stands as the pillar of prohibition-era European cocktail innovation. If Jerry Thomas’s Bartenders Guide is the best cocktail book the 1800s gave us, then The Savoy Cocktail Book is the best cocktail book of the first half of the 1900s. I don’t think I will ever be able to drink there, though. A cocktail cost around $250 there, and they have one that’s almost $1000, and I’m not the Amazon guy, so good thing we have their recipe book.

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Biter Cocktail

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: British
Servings

1

servings
Calories

241

kcal
ABV

34%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a Biter Cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 2 dashes Absinthe

  • 1/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/3 oz Simple Syrup

  • 2/3 oz Green Chartreuse

  • 1.5 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Midori Sour – Make The Classic 1970s Studio 54 Recipe

Midori Sour Cocktail
Midori Sour Cocktail

I’m a bit torn with this one. I wouldn’t say I like this drink, but it has its place in history, and some people like it. So here it is—the ultra-sweet and synthetic Midori Sour.

This isn’t a true late 70s Suntory Midori sour. The official recipe uses a sweet and sour mix, but that garbage has no place in this kind of an app, so I replaced it with orange liqueur and lemon juice. Sweet and sour is a lousy facsimile of those two ingredients. If you were thinking of making this drink or think you like it, I would suggest checking out the two improved Midori Sour recipes. The two improved recipes retain the melon flavor but mellow it out quite a bit and add more herbal or textural complexity to the drink. I think those two are decent drinks. For this one, I took one sip and then dumped it as soon as I finished taking the pictures for it.

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Midori Sour

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

279

kcal
ABV

20%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Midori Sour.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Midori

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Scofflaw – Original 1934 Harry’s New York Bar Recipe

Scofflaw Cocktail
Scofflaw Cocktail

In 1920s Paris, France, the Scofflaw was invented by a man known as Jock at Harry’s New York Bar. During prohibition, a few European and South American bars modeled themselves after the old American bars and turned up cool drinks like this.

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Scofflaw

0 from 0 votes Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: French
Servings

1

servings
Calories

244

kcal
ABV

22%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make the a classic Scofflaw.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 2/3 oz Grenadine

  • 1 oz Dry Vermouth

  • 2 oz Bourbon

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.


Margarita | Fantastic Original 1937 Cafe Royal Recipe

Margarita
Margarita

The History Of The Margarita.

This is the tequila variation of the Sidecar, and while it is heavily associated with Mexico, The oldest known recipe for it is from Britain. The Oldest known recipe is from the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book by William J. Tarling of London. The Cafe Royal has the EXACT recipe for a margarita, but it’s called the Picador and not the Margarita (Margarita is the Spanish word for a daisy flower).

I’ve heard the argument that since it’s not called the margarita, it’s not a margarita, but the recipe is precisely a margarita, and regardless of the name, the actual drink is more important. To William Tarling’s credit, the Cafe Royal was well known as a more experimental high-end bar that used exotic spirits, liqueurs, and juices. Tequila would be seen as exotic in 1930s England, and the book has not 1 but 14 different tequila recipes. I couldn’t find another cocktail book with that many tequila cocktails until the 1970s.

The first use of the name margarita comes from the December 1953 issue of Esquire Magazine. Their drink of the month section on page 76 says, “She’s from Mexico, and her name is the Margarita cocktail — She is lovely to look at, exciting and provocative.” The Esquire recipe is:

  • 1 oz Tequila
  • Dash of triple sec
  • Juice of half a lime or lemon
  • Pour over crushed ice, stir. Rub the rim of a stem glass with rind of lemon or lime, spin on salt, and sip.

Notably, Esquire was the first to add a salted rim to the cocktail, and their proportions are much sourer than the Cafe Royals.

Should I Use Margarita Mix, Sweet And Sour, Or Orange Liqueur And Citrus?

Margarita mix and Sweet and sour are the same things. The name sweet and sour is to sell the same product to people looking to make a drink other than just a margarita. The truth is they are all kind of crap. Some are better than others, but most of those cost between 25-30 USD, and at those prices, you might as well get the real stuff and buy Cointreau. Also, combining equal parts of orange liqueur and lime juice is already so easy that buying pre-mix is not beneficial.

The other consideration is which orange liqueur to buy. The market is over-saturated, and the selection is overwhelming. Cheap orange liqueur is often pretty gross, and if my option were a cheap orange liqueur or margarita mix, I would get the margarita mix. I love a deal, but orange liqueur is one of those items where you get what you pay for. Price-wise, about 20 and up, they taste pretty good. The next thing to consider is whether to get one made with an aged base spirit or not. Grand Marnier is made with an aged brandy, and Cointreau is not. Orange liqueurs made with an aged base spirit tend to be more mellow and easier to sip straight. If you like drinking cordials, then Grand Marnier would be a choice. Un-aged base spirits tend to have more robust, more crisp flavors. The orange flavor in orange liqueurs like Cointreau is rich and clean. It all comes down to your personal preferences. Cointreau mixes better in almost all cocktails and makes a fantastic margarita. It’s also the most expensive, but as I said earlier, you get what you pay for when buying orange liqueur, and the cost is typically proportional to quality.

What Is The Difference Between Orange Liqueur, Curaçao, And Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, triple sec, and curaçao are all the same products. They are all orange liqueurs. The reason for the different names is purely a marketing and product differentiation. The Dutch first started producing orange liqueur using Laraha oranges from the Caribbean island of curaçao somewhere in the 17th century. Sometime later, several French companies began producing orange liqueur too, and to make their product sound more exotic, Bols (the Dutch brand) began marketing theirs as Orange curaçao. In the 1850s, Cointreau came on to the scene and began selling their premium dry orange liqueur. Cointreau advertised that their base spirit (brandy) was filtered three times for clarity and neutrality to give their product a clean, crisp orange flavor. They called their product “Triple Sec,” which translates into English as three times dry. Cheap competitor quickly copied their branding and began calling their orange liqueurs triple sec. Cointreau later deemed the name triple sec had become chavey/tarnished and changed it back to simply orange liqueur. In an already confusing and oversaturated market, dyes were added to make one’s product stand out on the shelf next to other bottles. That is why orange liqueur goes by three different names and comes in every spectrum color.

William Tarling’s Cafe Royal Book And Its Influences.

Cafe Royal is massive. I can’t find exactly how many recipes are actually in this book, and I’m not going to count, but my best guess is around 1200. William Tarling did not create most of the recipes in Cafe Royal; he was the president of the UKBG (United Kingdom Bartenders Guild) and head bartender of the Cafe Royal in London. He instead compiled some of his own bars’ top recipes and the recipes of other UKBG into a single source. In his introduction, he says he combed through more than 4000 recipes to find the best and most original ones from around England. This book is a monster, and sadly ordinary folks like you and me will probably never own it. Sure there are limited reprints from time to time, but there were only 1000 original copies made in its single 1937 edition. The book was created and sold as a fundraising item for the UKBG healthcare benefit and Cafe Royal sports club. Healthcare didn’t become universal till 1948 in the UK. We’re still waiting here in the US.

William Tarling was known for experimenting with new ingredients. He positioned the Cafe Royal Bar as more edgy and experimental in its recipes compared to other more traditional bars like The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel. Cafe Royal was an early pioneer in Tequila, mezcal, and vodka cocktails mixed with exotic fruit juices. Tequila and Vodka cocktails don’t start becoming more common till the 1940s with the Moscow mule and the margarita. It’s easy to argue that the margarita was invented at the Cafe Royal in the early 1930s as their picador cocktail. In the book’s preface, William Tarling argues that there needs to be more originality and variety. Martinis and Manhattans are great but just as one tires of eating the same dinner night after night; it’s monotonous to drink the same drinks at every party. Have some fun and try channeling your inner William and try something you wouldn’t normally drink.

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Margarita – Original 1937 Recipe

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: Mexican
Servings

1

servings
Calories

247

kcal
ABV

32%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Margarita.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lime Juice

  • 1 oz Orange Liqueur

  • 2 oz Silver Tequila

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

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Aviation – Make The Delicious Original 1917 Recipe

Aviation Cocktail
Aviation Cocktail

The History Of The Aviation.

The Aviation was created in New York by Hugo Ensslin and is from his 1917 cocktail book, Recipes For Mixed Drinks. This was one of the last cocktail books to be written before prohibition, making this book a fascinating profile of the height of mixing drinks in pre-prohibition America. This delicious drink didn’t last long because once prohibition went into effect, Creme de Violette stopped being produced, and people started mixing this with either Creme Yvette or just leaving the Creme de Violette out entirely.

Creme de Violette started being imported into the United States in 2007 again, and it became possible to make real aviation again. It’s incredible to think that for almost 90 years, this drink was never made in the United States, which explains why this drink was not very popular till recently.

What Does The Aviation Taste Like?

The Aviation is a fantastic cocktail and deceptively potent. It’s slightly sour and not too sweet and has a beautiful floral lavender cherry flavor unique to any other sour. The Aviation is as delicious as it looks. This is the cocktail I make for people who say they hate gin. Everyone loves this drink.

The Most Important Ingredient.

The essential ingredient in this drink is the Creme De Violette. For the most part, this is a pretty easy drink to make, and the ingredients are straightforward. The issue I have found is not all Creme De Violette are good quality. You may only see 1 or 2 different bottles of Creme De Violette at a large liquor store, and the cheaper ones (about $15 or less) lack flavor. They have the right color, but I need to use a whole oz to make the flavor right. The higher quality ones have much more flavor and only need the required 1/2 oz to taste right; even with limited options, it’s better to buy the higher quality Creme De Violette.

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Aviation

5 from 1 vote Only logged in users can rate recipes
Course: DrinksCuisine: American
Servings

1

servings
Calories

246

kcal
ABV

28%

Total time

3

minutes

Learn how to make a classic Aviation.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 oz Lemon Juice

  • 1/2 oz Maraschino Liqueur

  • 1/2 oz Creme de Violette

  • 2 oz Dry Gin

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in the shaker. Add ice to the shaker.
  • Vigorously shake till the shaker is ice cold and frosted.
  • Strain into glass to remove ice shards.
  • Garnish with a maraschino cherry

Recipe Video

Notes


Make Cocktails Like A Pro

If you have ever struggled with a recipe or wonder why yours are not turning out like they do at the bar then check out my simple step-by-step videos. I will walk you through how to expertly build each drink so you get consistently great results.

  • Free and simple step by step videos.
  • Tips and tricks from years of experience.
  • Historically accurate and balanced recipes.